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1985 Planet Ceres Atlantic hurricane season

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1985 Planet Ceres Atlantic hurricane season
First storm formed July 24
Last storm dissipated December 10
Strongest storm Heffer; 180 mph, 896 mbar
Total storms 23
Hurricanes 16
Major hurricanes 9
Total damages 16,280+
Total fatalities $35.886 billion (1980 USD), $71.772 billion (2008 USD)
The 1980 Planet Ceres Atlantic hurricane season started on June 1, and ended on November 30. It was the second-most active season in Planet Ceres history at the time, with 16 tropical depressions, 16 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 4 major hurricanes.

The 1985 Planet Ceres Atlantic Hurricane Season was one of the most active on record, with 28 tropical or subtropical depressions, 23 tropical or subtropical storms, 14 hurricanes, and 9 major hurricanes (all of which were records at the time). The season was very destructive and deadly; Hurricanes Dylan, Elena, Heffer, Karen, Percy, Stan, and Victor, along with Tropical Storms Gloria and Olivia, were responsible for most of the losses. Gloria and Karen were notable for fueling the 1985 Mexico Flooding (Planet Ceres event). Hurricane Heffer caused significant damage to areas in Texas, while Hurricane Elena caused severe damage to localized areas in Mexico. Hurricane Percy caused over 1,000 deaths as it swept through the Dominican Republic at full force, and Hurricane Victor's heavy damage to areas in Florida made it the costliest Atlantic hurricane on record at the time on Planet Ceres.










Storms

Subtropical Storm One

Subtropical storm

 (SSHS)

STS Nicole 10 oct 2004 1530Z.jpg
Duration May 11May 14
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min) 977 mbar (hPa; 28.85 inHg)

Main article: 1985 Mother's Day Subtropical Storm

A frontal low emerged off the coast of Florida on May 8 and tracked eastward. Despite producing tropical storm-force winds, it failed to organize until it developed a warm core on May 11, at which point it attained subtropical characteristics, and was declared Subtropical Storm One. As the storm neared Bermuda, where it would be known as the 1985 Mother's Day Subtropical Storm, Tropical Storm Warnings were issued, and evacuations were ordered for low-lying areas along the western coast of the island, and for low-lying homes near river banks. On Mother's Day (which was May 13 during 1985), the storm passed directly over the island at its peak intensity of 60 mph winds, and a pressure of 977 mbar. On May 14, the storm became extratropical as it raced off to the northeast, eventually affecting the United Kingdom. Damage was estimated at $175 million (1985 USD; $350 million 2008 USD), and 65 people lost their lives in the storm, making it the deadliest storm in Bermuda's history.

Hurricane Alicia

Main article: Hurricane Alicia (1985)

Category 1 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Florence 09 sept 1988 2203Z.jpg
Duration June 3June 8
Intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min) 983 mbar (hPa; 29.03 inHg)

Hurricane Alicia struck Louisiana in June of 1985, causing $100 million (1985 USD; $200 million 2008 USD) in damage and 10 deaths.









Tropical Depression Two

Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

Tropical Depression 10 (2005).png
Duration June 20June 21
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 1006 mbar (hPa; 29.71 inHg)

A tropical wave emerged off the coast of Africa on June 18 before developing a surface low and being designated Tropical Depression Two on June 20. Initially forecast to strengthen into a tropical storm, wind shear began forming on June 21, shearing the depression apart that afternoon without having ever threatened land. Had the depression been successful in reaching tropical storm strength, it would have been named Tropical Storm Bob.






Hurricane Bob

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Ike off the Lesser Antilles.jpg
Duration July 3July 22
Intensity 135 mph (215 km/h) (1-min) 933 mbar (hPa; 27.55 inHg)

In late June, shortly after Tropical Depression Two dissipated, a monsoon trough stationed itself over western Africa, producing heavy rain across Morocco, Western Sahara, Algeria, Mauritania, Mali, Senegal, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Cote D'ivoire, Burkina Faso, and Ghana. The same monsoon trough would soon develop a series of tropical waves, the first of which developed into Tropical Depression Three on July 3, and into Tropical Storm Bob the following day. Bob slowly strengthened while passing near Cape Verde, and became a hurricane on July 8. Despite the close passage to the Cape Verde islands, only minor damage was reported. Favorable conditions prevailed, and Bob strengthened into a major hurricane on July 10. On July 11 during the evening hours, Bob underwent an eyewall replacement cycle, and weakened to a Category 2 hurricane on July 12. Normally, a tropical cyclone would re-strengthen shortly after the cycle completed, but Bob continued to weaken as it moved over cooler waters as shear increased, and Bob was downgraded to a Category 1 hurricane on July 13, and to a tropical storm on July 14. On July 15, however, conditions improved as Bob continued to the east-northeast, and Bob regained hurricane strength on July 16. Bob underwent rapid intensification that night to regain major hurricane status early on July 17. Around noon that day, Bob reached a peak of 135 mph winds, and a pressure of 933 mbar. During the evening on July 18, cooler waters weakened Bob again, and the storm weakened to a Category 2 hurricane early on July 19. Although Bob briefly threatened New England during this time, the storm turned away, causing no damage. Bob weakened to a tropical storm early on July 21, and became extratropical later that day. Even though Bob was not responsible for any damage, the storm was responsible for eighteen drownings off the eastern coast of the United States due to rip currents. Six more drownings off the African coast, as well as two plane crashes (one of which involving a Hurricane Hunters flight) and the sinking of a Portuguese cargo ship, increased Bob's death toll to 112 people.

Bob held several records as a hurricane. First, the storm killed 112 people, and is the deadliest storm on record in July. At the time, it was also the strongest July storm until Hurricane Dylan broke the record only one day later. Seven days after that, Hurricane Elena broke that record. Also, the name Bob was not retired after this season, making Bob one of the deadliest storms on record not to have its name retired. When Bob reached Category 3 intensity on July 10, it was the first major hurricane in July since 1915.

Tropical Storm Chloe

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Ingrid 14 sept 2007 1310Z.jpg
Duration July 11July 14
Intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min) 999 mbar (hPa; 29.5 inHg)

On July 9, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. On July 11, it organized itself to become Tropical Depression Four, which became Tropical Storm Chloe later that day. After reaching a peak of 50 mph winds on July 13, cool waters and wind shear took their toll on Chloe, and the storm dissipated into a remnant low on July 14. Chloe was not responsible for any deaths or damage because it never affected land, although a Tropical Storm Warning was briefly in effect for the central Lesser Antilles. The remnants passed through the area, but no damages or fatalities were reported. The remnants dissipated completely on July 16 in the eastern Caribbean Sea.





Hurricane Dylan

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Edouard 26 aug 1996 1744Z.jpg
Duration July 15August 11
Intensity 145 mph (230 km/h) (1-min) 930 mbar (hPa; 27.46 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Dylan (1985)

Hurricane Dylan was a long-lasting Cape Verde-type hurricane. The storm began its origins in mid-July, when a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. Despite deep convection and tropical storm-force winds, the wave failed to develop until July 15. Late that morning, Hurricane Hunters reconnaissance aircraft found that the wave had developed a low-level circulation, and at eleven o'clock in the morning, the tropical wave became Tropical Storm Dylan, skipping the tropical depression stage entirely. Favorable conditions prevailed, and Dylan became a hurricane on July 17. Then, on July 18, Hurricane Dylan entered still more favorable conditions, and, that afternoon, Dylan underwent explosive intensification--an extreme case of rapid deepening in which the pressure of the hurricane drops at least 2.5 mbar for at least twelve hours; due to significantly favorable conditions, Hurricane Dylan strengthened from an 85-mph Category 1 hurricane to a 145-mph Category 4 hurricane in 15 hours, as well as a barometric central pressure drop of 58 millibars in the same period (from 990 to 932), breaking the one-day-old record set by Hurricane Bob for strongest July storm. Dylan's minimum central pressure was 930 mbar, attained on July 20. Dylan retained Category 4 status until July 23, and was a major hurricane until July 24, when Dylan entered cooler waters as it neared North Carolina, getting close enough to require Hurricane Warnings. For the next five days, Dylan stalled near the Carolinas, bringing flooding rains but staying offshore. The storm moved erratically in this area until high pressure to the storm's north carried Dylan to the southeast on July 31. On August 2, after weakening to a Category 1 hurricane while near the Carolinas, Dylan resumed strengthening, becoming a Category 3 major hurricane on August 4. However, by August 6, dry air started to become entrained into the system, and Dylan began to weaken again. Dylan dropped below hurricane strength on August 9. Then, as it weakened to a tropical depression early on August 11, the final advisory was issued when Dylan's circulation was absorbed into the larger Hurricane Filburt. Lasting for 27 days, or nearly four weeks, Dylan was one of the longest-lasting Atlantic hurricanes on record on Planet Ceres. Dylan was responsible for 12 deaths and $600 million (1985 USD) in damage, both mainly from the flooding.

Hurricane Elena

Main article: Hurricane Elena (1985)

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Emily.jpg
Duration July 18July 30
Intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min) 930 mbar (hPa; 27.46 inHg)

Like the previous storm, Hurricane Dylan, Hurricane Elena was a powerful Cape Verde-type hurricane. A vigorous tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa on July 14, but failed to organize until July 18, when a low-level circulation developed and the system was designated Tropical Depression Six while east of the Lesser Antilles. Late on July 19, flight-level winds were found to have increased to tropical storm-force, and the system was declared Tropical Storm Elena, the fifth named storm of the season. As conditions became increasingly favorable, Elena strengthened further, and became a hurricane early on July 21 as it passed over Canouan. Slightly cooler waters in the eastern Caribbean Sea caused Elena to weaken to a tropical storm that afternoon, but the next day, Elena began re-strengthening, and regained hurricane strength late on July 22. As the storm entered the central Caribbean Sea on July 23, conditions became more and more favorable for development, and Elena intensified into the third major hurricane of the season early on July 24. During the afternoon on July 25, Elena reached a peak of 155 mph winds, and a pressure of 930 mbar, breaking Hurricane Dylan's seven day-old record for strongest July storm (even though the two storms had the same minimum central pressure, at 930 millibars, Elena was stronger because it had higher peak windspeeds than Dylan). Early on July 27, Elena made landfall on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico with 135 mph winds, a weak Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Due to the mountainous terrain, Elena weakened rapidly, and was a Category 1 hurricane by the time it exited the peninsula. Elena then re-strengthened into a Category 3 hurricane by the time of its second landfall in southern Tamaulipas state on July 30. Mountainous terrain weakened Elena, and the storm dissipated on August 1. Throughout its path, deaths were moderate with Elena having claimed 14 lives, but damages soared to $600 million (1985 USD).

Tropical Depression Seven

Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

Tropical Depression Two (2000).JPG 2-L 2000 track.png
Duration July 25July 26
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 1007 mbar (hPa; 29.74 inHg)

On July 25, Tropical Depression Seven formed west of Africa. It failed to organize much, and it dissipated the next day.








Hurricane Filburt

Category 3 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Felix 13 sept 2001 1703Z.jpg
Duration July 28August 15
Intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min) 961 mbar (hPa; 28.38 inHg)

Filburt ended the streak of Cape Verde-type storms; Filburt's precursor was an ITCZ disturbance instead. On July 28, the disturbance organized enough to be declared Tropical Depression Eight, which strengthened into Tropical Storm Filburt the next day. For the next few days, wind shear prevented Filburt from strengthening much; Filburt actually weakened to a tropical depression on July 31, but regained tropical storm strength the next day. Then, on August 2, wind shear let up as Filburt moved over warmer waters. Filburt rapidly intensified for about 24 hours, exploding into a Category 3 major hurricane--the fourth of the season--by mid-morning on August 3, when Filburt reached its peak of 115 mph winds. Filburt remained steady in intensity for about 36 hours. Late on August 4, shear increased again, and Filburt weakened to a Category 2 hurricane early the next morning; it was actually at this point that Filburt's central pressure was at it's lowest, at 961 millibars--the lowest pressure reading taken from Filburt while it was a Category 3 was 2 millibars higher at 963 millibars. After briefly regaining Category 3 intensity on August 6, Filburt established a solid weakening streak, dropping to Category 1 strength on August 7 and to a tropical storm on August 8. Filburt kept at tropical storm strength until August 11, when Filburt re-intensified into a Category 1 hurricane just prior to absorbing Tropical Depression Dylan, which was formerly a Category 4 hurricane at its peak intensity. On August 12, Filburt reached a secondary peak of 85 mph winds before it began moving over cooler water. Cool waters weakened Filburt to a tropical storm on August 13 and, on August 15, Filburt became extratropical. Despite its longevity (lasting for 18 days, or 2 and a half weeks), Filburt was not responsible for any damages or fatalities.

Tropical Storm Gloria

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Tropical Storm Gert (2005).png Gert 2005 track.png
Duration August 29September 1
Intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min) 1005 mbar (hPa; 29.68 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Storm Gloria

After a two-week respite in activity, a shear line stalled in the Caribbean Sea, spawning a vigorous tropical wave in late August. After passing through Belize and the Yucatan peninsula, the wave began to organize as it approached mainland Mexico, and on August 29, the wave became Tropical Depression Nine in the Bay of Campeche, strengthening into Tropical Storm Gloria twelve hours later. After being named, Gloria did not strengthen much before making landfall in Mexico; the storm's peak winds were only 45 mph. However, Gloria managed to linger near the Mexican mainland for two days, bringing torrential rainfall that led to lethal and costly flooding. By the time Gloria dissipated late on September 1, the weak but catastrophic storm had been immediately responsible for 34 deaths. However, by the time analysis of Gloria's effects was complete by early the next year, Gloria was held responsible for over 500 deaths, mainly in the state of Tamaulipas, and damages had been reported at $3.5 billion (1985 USD). The name Gloria was retired after this season, due to the extreme damage and high death toll in Mexico.

Subtropical Depression Two

Subtropical depression

 (SSHS)

TD Ten 21 sept 2007 1650Z.jpg
Duration September 2September 3
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 990 mbar (hPa; 29.23 inHg)

See also: September 1985 New England flooding (Planet Ceres event)

Main article: Subtropical Depression Two (1985)

On September 2, Subtropical Depression Two formed north of Cuba, the only subtropical cyclone spawned by the early-September Caribbean shear line; the other four, Tropical Storms Gloria and Isabel and Hurricanes Heffer and Karen, were all tropical when they formed. At peak intensity, 18 hours later, Subtropical Depression Two made landfall on the panhandle of Florida, with 35 mph winds. Subtropical Depression Two dissipated the next day over land. Even though the storm caused only minor damage as a subtropical cyclone, the remnants merged with an extratropical cyclone to produce major flooding, high winds, and tornadoes over New England, with the states of Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine being hardest hit. Extreme damage totaled over $350 million (1985 USD), and over 35 people were killed as a result. Luckily, because my parents were vacationing in New Jersey at the time, they not only escaped the worst of it, but they survived, too. Their house was destroyed, though. On Planet Ceres, this is the reason why they moved here to Wilmington, Massachusetts.

Hurricane Isabel

Category 1 hurricane

 (SSHS)

07L 1415UTC 250808.jpg
Duration September 4September 9
Intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min) 989 mbar (hPa; 29.21 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Isabel (1985)

The third tropical or subtropical wave spawned by the early-September Caribbean shear line developed on September 4 into Tropical Depression Ten. Initially, this system was forecast to be named Heffer. However, as what would become disastrous Hurricane Heffer was named first, Tropical Depression Ten became Tropical Storm Isabel instead, six hours after Heffer was named. Isabel peaked with 75 mph winds, just barely hurricane strength, only hours before the system made landfall near Jacmel, Haiti on September 6. Weakening over land, Isabel briefly weakened to a tropical depression for one lone six-hour period before regaining tropical storm strength as it approached Florida over the Bahamas. Isabel struck Florida near Cape Canaveral with 55 mph winds, Isabel's final landfall, on September 8. As Isabel weakened again, the final advisory was issued on September 9 as Isabel rapidly transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. Although Florida escaped with only moderate damage, with much of the state west of Orlando left unscathed, damage in Haiti was extreme. In Haiti alone, over 100 people were killed, and $180 million (1985 USD) resulted. Mere days later, the country would receive severe consequences from Hurricane Heffer, and would also be devastated by Hurricanes Percy and Victor before the season was over.

Hurricane Heffer

Category 5 hurricane

 (SSHS)

HurricaneRita21Sept05a.jpg
Duration September 5September 16
Intensity 180 mph (285 km/h) (1-min) 896 mbar (hPa; 26.46 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Heffer

The same shear line that spawned Tropical Storm Gloria, and would later go on to spawn Tropical Storm Isabel and Hurricane Karen, spawned its third tropical wave (fourth including the wave that spawned Subtropical Depression Two) on September 4. In a favorable environment, the wave quickly organized, and became Tropical Storm Heffer early the next morning; skipping the tropical depression stage entirely, Heffer was the second of three storms during the season to do so, the other two being Hurricanes Dylan and Percy. After forming, due to quite a favorable environment, Heffer rapidly intensified, becoming a hurricane the next day, and a major hurricane, the fifth of the season, on September 7 only 48 hours after forming, the fastest time ever taken for an Atlantic hurricane on Planet Ceres to reach that intensity. By that evening, Heffer was a Category 4 hurricane, barreling straight for Haiti. Then, early on September 8, Heffer roared ashore Haiti with winds clocked at 155 mph, not only on the verge of Category 5 intensity, but also one of the most intense storms to ever hit Haiti; by the time Heffer came ashore, the storm's pressure had plunged to 920 mbar. Only the Great Haiti hurricane of 1919 was stronger when it came ashore Haiti. As a result, Heffer is often compared to this Haitian catastrophe.

Due to its large size, when Heffer came ashore Haiti on the brink of Category 5 intensity, catastrophic damage extended into the Dominican Republic. Entire cities, such as Jacmel and Gonaives, were extremely devastated. In Haiti alone, over 3,000 people were killed as a result of Hurricane Heffer, and the Dominican Republic fared little to no better. In Santo Domingo, the seaport was badly damaged. Over 200 boats were either severely damaged, destroyed or lost, resulting in 19 marine deaths and 5 people aboard the S.S. Jimbo to go missing, although all five returned home safely. In the Dominican Republic, over 1,500 people were killed, mainly due to extreme flooding and mudslides that affected Haiti as well. To make matters worse, Heffer came ashore only two days after Tropical Storm Isabel, giving local residents no time to clean up the damage. Throughout Hispaniola, over 4,500 people were killed, and $3 billion (1985 USD) in damage resulted, making Heffer one of the deadliest Atlantic hurricanes of all time on Planet Ceres.

Heffer still wasn't done. It weakened to a Category 3 hurricane by the time it came ashore Cuba, though damage there was severe to extreme. Heffer slammed ashore Cuba with 130 mph winds, a high-end Category 3 hurricane, knocking out power, destroying weak homes, tearing roofs off of stronger ones, and causing curtainwall failures. Heffer's flooding also washed whole buildings away, caused destructive mudslides, and polluted the water supply. In all, Cuba suffered $1.4 billion (1985 USD) in damage, but only 6 deaths, thanks to a prior warning system that Haiti and the Dominican Republic both lacked.

Because of the mountainous terrain, Heffer dropped to Category 1 intensity by the time it exited Cuba on September 10. However, when Heffer entered the Loop current while in the Gulf of Mexico, highly favorable conditions allowed Heffer to rapidly intensify. By afternoon on September 11, Heffer was a Category 5 hurricane, the only storm of the season to reach such an intensity, and by such virtue was the strongest storm of the season. By morning on September 12, Heffer had continued to rapidly intensify to reach a peak of 180 mph winds and a pressure of 896 mbar, at the time making Heffer the second-most intense Atlantic hurricane on record on Planet Ceres. To make matters worse, Heffer was headed straight for Texas.

With Heffer headed for the Corpus Christi and Houston areas, mandatory evacuations were ordered as Heffer approached Texas at Category 5 intensity. However, as Heffer approached, wind shear became entrained within the system, and Heffer weakened slowly but steadily. However, Heffer was still a Category 4 hurricane when it roared ashore south of Galveston with 145 mph winds on September 14. Extensive damage to trees, buildings, power lines, sand dunes, and roads resulted from the high winds, flooding, and storm surge. By the time Heffer dissipated early on September 16, it was declared the worst hurricane to hit the area in 75 years. In Texas, Heffer was responsible for 47 deaths and $2.9 billion (1985 USD) in damage, making Heffer Texas' first billion-dollar storm on Planet Ceres.

In the end, Heffer was responsible for $7.3 billion (1985 USD) in damage, and over 4,598 deaths. It was also one of only three named Category 4 hurricanes to make landfall in Texas at that strength, the other two being Hurricane Alexis of 2003 and Hurricane Sandy of 2004. The name Heffer was retired after this season, due to the catastrophic consequences in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, and record damages in Texas.

Hurricane Jerry

Category 2 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Juan.jpg
Duration September 11September 22
Intensity 105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min) 978 mbar (hPa; 28.88 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Jerry (1985)

Hurricane Jerry was a Cape Verde-type hurricane, as its precursor was a tropical wave that moved off the coast of Africa on September 11. Later that day, the wave quickly organized to become Tropical Depression Twelve, and into Tropical Storm Jerry that evening, the tenth named storm of the season. Even though Jerry rapidly attained 60 mph winds, intensification stopped the next morning as dry air became entrained within the system, and as a result, Jerry weakened to a low of 40 mph winds on September 13. After that, Jerry slowly began to re-intensify. On September 17, Jerry rapidly intensified, becoming a hurricane that evening and reaching a peak of 105 mph winds that night, a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Initially, it was at this point that Jerry was forecast to become a major hurricane. However, after retaining peak intensity for 24 hours, Jerry began to weaken due to wind shear. Jerry weakened to a Category 1 hurricane on the evening of September 19, and to a tropical storm two days later. On September 22, Jerry became extratropical, and the final advisory was issued. Although Jerry threatened both Bermuda and Newfoundland, the storm veered away from both areas, causing no damage, but killing 3 people due to rip currents.


Hurricane Karen

Category 1 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Allison 04 jun 1995 1313Z.jpg
Duration September 12September 18
Intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min) 989 mbar (hPa; 29.21 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Karen (1985)

Hurricane Karen was the deadliest storm of the season. The final storm to be spawned by the early-September Caribbean shear line, Karen formed as Tropical Depression Thirteen near the Mexican coastline on September 12, where the depression lingered for nearly two days. The resulting rainfall made matters worse for rain-drenched areas of Mexico that had already received flooding rainfall from Tropical Storm Gloria two weeks prior. After causing extreme destruction to areas of Mexico, the tropical depression traversed the Gulf of Mexico from west to east, which is extremely rare. On September 14, encountering favorable conditions in the Gulf of Mexico, Tropical Depression Thirteen became Tropical Storm Karen while south-southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana. Karen steadily strengthened, becoming a hurricane just prior to striking Florida north of Florida at peak intensity, with 75 mph winds, early on September 16. After spending just 12 hours as a hurricane, Karen weakened back to a tropical storm over Florida before re-emerging into the north Atlantic Ocean. Although initially forecast to regain hurricane status at this time, wind shear developed, and Karen continued to weaken instead. On September 18, Karen dissipated in the open Atlantic Ocean.

The death toll from Hurricane Karen was staggering. Over 8,500 people were killed in central Mexico from a single mudslide that wiped out the villages of San Esteban, San Esteban del Sur, and Himynameisfredmayitakeyourorder?, killing all but one of their combined occupants, with an additional 400 people killed in the same country. However, this was all before Karen was named; as a named storm, Karen only did light to moderate damage. Regardless, the storm was responsible for over over 9,000 deaths, and $2.8 billion (1985 USD) in damage, primarily as a tropical depression prior to reaching tropical storm strength.

Hurricane Lazlo

Category 1 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Ophelia 9142005.jpg
Duration September 15September 23
Intensity 85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min) 976 mbar (hPa; 28.82 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Lazlo (1985)

An area of disturbed weather formed over the southern Bahamas on September 14. Slowly organizing, the disturbance became Tropical Depression Fourteen on September 15, and into Tropical Storm Lazlo on September 16. Due to wind shear from the outflow of nearby Hurricane Karen, Lazlo did not strengthen until September 18, when Karen dissipated as Lazlo slowly edged toward South Carolina. Because of Karen's dissipation, wind shear slackened, and Lazlo was allowed to strengthen. Late on September 19, Lazlo strengthened to become the ninth hurricane of the season as it approached a possible landfall in North Carolina. While offshore on September 20, Lazlo attained a peak of 85 mph winds, a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, very near North Carolina but never making landfall there. After reaching peak intensity, Lazlo stopped meandering offshore North Carolina and picked up speed as it approached Cape Cod, where hurricane warnings were put into effect. On September 22, Lazlo skimmed the region with 75 mph winds, making Lazlo the first hurricane to affect New England as such in 17 years. After the close brush with Massachusetts, Lazlo weakened as it raced over cooler waters, brushing Nova Scotia with 50-55 mph winds shortly before becoming extratropical on September 23 prior to making its only true landfall in Newfoundland.

Throughout its path, Lazlo was responsible for 20 deaths and $90 million (1985 USD) in damage, as well as a tornado outbreak that produced 83 tornadoes.

Tropical Depression Fifteen

Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

Tropical Storm Bret (1993).jpg
Duration September 19September 20
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 1009 mbar (hPa; 29.8 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Depression Fifteen (1985)

On September 16, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. Although the wave looked healthy in that it was organized and had deep convection, the wave was not classified until September 19, when a low-level circulation developed and the system was declared Tropical Depression Fifteen. However, it failed to reach tropical storm strength before making landfall in Venezuela on September 20, and dissipated later that day as the mountainous terrain destroyed Tropical Depression Fifteen's circulation. However, the depression did great damage.

Over 1,300 people were killed by Tropical Depression Fifteen, and damages amounted to $1.4 billion (1985 USD). Over 300,000 people were displaced due to the storm, and power was out for over a month. The soybean crop industry suffered extreme damage, causing soybean prices to rise around the world as production was reduced by up to 80%, and several farms lost their entire soybean crop.

Hurricane Minerva

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Bertha 07 july 2008 1630Z.jpg
Duration September 20October 7
Intensity 135 mph (215 km/h) (1-min) 941 mbar (hPa; 27.79 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Minerva (1985)

Hurricane Minerva was a long-lasting Cape Verde-type hurricane. On September 17, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa, but failed to organize until September 20, when it developed a low-level circulation and was declared Tropical Depression Sixteen. It gradually strengthened, and became Tropical Storm Minerva on September 21. However, for four days, wind shear prevented Minerva from strengthening, and it remained a small and weak tropical storm. Early on September 26, wind shear slackened, allowing Minerva to gradually strengthen, and by September 28, Minerva was nearing hurricane strength. That evening, Minerva rapidly intensified, and skipped Category 1 intensity to become a Category 2 hurricane in one advisory, and then into a Category 3 hurricane later that night, making Minerva the sixth major hurricane of the season. After a 12-hour bout of explosive intensification, Minerva strengthened very slowly, reaching a peak of 135 mph winds on September 30. After maintaining peak intensity for 2 days, Minerva slowly weakened, but so slowly that it did not drop to a Category 2 hurricane until late on October 3, and not to a Category 1 until October 5. On October 7, while still a weak hurricane, Minerva became extratropical, and the final advisory was issued. Interestingly enough, Minerva was actually strengthening on the final advisory; during this advisory, Minerva's winds increased from 85 to 95 mph. In its extratropical phase, ex-Minerva would continue strengthening, eventually reaching a peak of 145 mph--stronger than Minerva was in its entire life as a tropical cyclone--and equivalent to a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale--before roaring ashore in the southern United Kingdom at peak intensity, causing catastrophic damage.

Tropical Storm Norbert

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Earl 01 oct 1992 1944Z.jpg
Duration September 24September 29
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min) 992 mbar (hPa; 29.29 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Storm Norbert (1985)

Part of the wave that spawned Hurricane Minerva would also go on to spawn Tropical Storm Norbert. This part of the wave gradually developed a low-level circulation, by September 24 enough to be declared Tropical Depression Seventeen, and then Tropical Storm Norbert on the second advisory. Norbert continued westward, eventually impacting the Bahamas on September 27 with 60 mph winds, Norbert's peak intensity. Later that day, Norbert struck Florida with 55 mph winds before emerging into the Gulf of Mexico, and Norbert struck Louisiana on September 28 with 60 mph winds. Norbert weakened over land, and dissipated on September 29. Damage estimates were primarily low, perhaps due to Norbert's small size and fast movement.




Tropical Storm Olivia

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Fay 15 August 2008 MODIS.jpg
Duration September 28September 30
Intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min) 1001 mbar (hPa; 29.56 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Storm Olivia (1985)

Late on September 25, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. Despite producing deep convection, the wave was not classified until a low-level circulation developed on September 28, and was declared Tropical Depression Eighteen, and then Tropical Storm Olivia early on September 29. Shortly after reaching a peak of 45 mph winds around noon that day, Olivia made landfall in the Dominican Republic at peak intensity. The mountainous terrain tore Olivia's circulation apart, and Olivia dissipated late that night.

Because Olivia was barely a tropical storm, it was severely underestimated. Even after facing cataclysmic Hurricane Heffer, the Dominican Republic doubted Olivia's potential, and neither the Dominican Republic or neighboring Haiti issued warnings as Olivia approached. This proved to be a huge mistake, as the lack of warnings resulted in over 300 deaths from Tropical Storm Olivia, and damage totaled to $750 million (1985 USD), mainly in the Dominican Republic.

The disturbing consequences from the lack of warnings in advance of Olivia were not limited to damage and death toll. Haiti and the Dominican Republic were globally accused of "inattentiveness to a potential catastrophe," which was fueled by the fact that Olivia was a slow-moving storm, and had unusually heavy rainfall for a storm of Olivia's intensity. As a result, the presidents of both countries were impeached, and the leaders of many countries cited the presidents as "extremely irresponsible." Also, in spring of 1986, when the Dominican Republic requested the retirement of the name Olivia, the WMO turned down the request, citing that "even though Olivia was extremely deadly and destructive, a major reason for this was the irresponsibility of Haiti and the Dominican Republic for refraining from issuing warnings on Tropical Storm Olivia."

Neither the Dominican Republic nor Haiti would have time to recover from Olivia before Hurricane Percy slammed into the Dominican Republic at Category 3 intensity only nine days later.

Hurricane Percy

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Georges 20 sept 1998 1847Z.jpg
Duration October 1October 15
Intensity 140 mph (220 km/h) (1-min) 935 mbar (hPa; 27.61 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Percy

Hurricane Percy was the 1985 season's first October storm. On September 28, a vigorous tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. Despite producing tropical storm-force winds and deep convection, the system was not classified until October 1, when Hurricane Hunters aircraft discovered a low-level circulation late in the morning, and the system was declared Tropical Storm Percy, the last of three storms to skip the tropical depression stage entirely, the first two being Hurricanes Dylan and Heffer. Forming in a favorable environment allowed Percy to strengthen, and Percy became the eleventh hurricane of the season on October 3. Shortly after becoming a hurricane, Percy underwent explosive intensification, exploding into a Category 4 hurricane by the morning of October 4. Later that day, Hurricane Percy reached a peak of 140 mph winds. Although initially forecast to continue intensifying and reach Category 5 intensity prior to sweeping through the Leeward Islands, wind shear stopped Percy's intensification at the last minute, and Percy never attained Category 5 status. Regardless, Percy was still a powerful major hurricane as it stormed directly through Guadeloupe early on October 6, and widespread heavy damage was reported on the island. Despite wind shear, and mountainous terrain over Guadeloupe, Percy maintained Category 4 intensity until late on October 6, when Hurricane Percy put itself on a course headed directly on a course for the Dominican Republic, which was clobbered by Tropical Storm Olivia only nine days before Percy roared ashore the same area. Early in the evening on October 8, Hurricane Percy made landfall in the Dominican Republic with 125 mph winds, a Category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Percy was unusual in that it made a direct hit on the capital of the Dominican Republic, Santo Domingo, the only storm on record to do so. Percy added to an already-severe flooding problem in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, killing over 1,000 people on its own, and causing $5 billion (1985 USD) in damage to Hispaniola, a higher-than-expected number due to the storm's direct hit on Santo Domingo, the seventh most populous city in North America, as a Category 3 major hurricane.

After landfall in the Dominican Republic, Hurricane Percy weakened significantly, dropping to tropical storm strength by the time it exited Hispaniola during the evening on October 9, striking the island of Great Inagua in the Bahamas with 55 mph winds that night. Because now-Tropical Storm Percy was a weak storm at the time of impact, damage was very low compared to the magnitude seen in the Dominican Republic. As Percy entered marginally favorable conditions, it gradually re-strengthened, and regained hurricane status prior to impact in the Florida Keys at Marathon with 80 mph winds on October 11, a Category 1 hurricane. Later, on October 12, Percy strengthened to attain 110 mph winds, a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, while in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Percy retained this intensity until just prior to its landfall on the Florida panhandle, when the storm strengthened at the last minute to attain Category 3 strength mere hours prior to landfall at Fort Walton Beach, Florida with 115 mph winds on October 13, the first major hurricane to make landfall in Florida since Hurricane Henry of the 1979 season. Weakening over land, Percy weakened to a tropical storm on October 14, and to a tropical depression on October 15 before becoming extratropical that day.

In all, Hurricane Percy was responsible for $7.6 billion (1985 USD) in damage, breaking Hurricane Heffer's one-month old record for costliest Atlantic hurricane on Planet Ceres. Also, Percy was responsible for at least 1,092 deaths, making Percy the record-tying third storm of the season to cause 1,000+ deaths, following Hurricane Heffer and the tropical depression that would develop into Hurricane Karen. The name Percy was retired after this season, due to severe consequences in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, and significant damage in Florida.

Tropical Depression Nineteen

Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

TD ten 2004.jpg
Duration October 7October 8
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 1008 mbar (hPa; 29.77 inHg)

Tropical Depression Nineteen formed west of the Cape Verde islands on October 7. It failed to strengthen, and dissipated the next day having never affected land. Tropical Depression Nineteen actually formed from half of a tropical wave that formed along the Intertropical Convergence Zone; the second half would go on to spawn Hurricane Rita.







Hurricane Rita

Category 2 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Bonnie 21 sept 1992 1823Z.jpg
Duration October 13October 27
Intensity 110 mph (175 km/h) (1-min) 966 mbar (hPa; 28.53 inHg)

Rita formed from the second half of the tropical wave that spawned Tropical Depression Nineteen. Although initially weak and poorly organized (at one point even being forecast to dissipate without reaching hurricane strength), favorable conditions saved Rita at the last minute, bringing the storm back to tropical storm status on October 18 after weakening to a tropical depression for a short period of time, and then, on October 21, Rita finally became a hurricane, the twelfth of the season. In the open Atlantic Ocean, Rita would go on to peak with 110 mph winds--a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, and extremely close--falling only 1 mph shy of the threshold--to becoming the eighth major hurricane of the season. Rita maintained peak intensity for 24 hours from October 23 to October 24 before weakening over cooler waters over the Atlantic, and Rita dropped to Category 1 intensity on October 25, and to a tropical storm on October 27, during the same advisory in which Rita became extratropical. Rita never threatened land, though the only fatality from Rita was reported in Massachusetts due to rip currents.


Hurricane Stan

Category 3 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Roxanne 10 oct 1995 1855Z.jpg
Duration October 20November 6
Intensity 115 mph (185 km/h) (1-min) 961 mbar (hPa; 28.38 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Stan

Unusually southerly Tropical Depression Twenty-Two formed only about 100 miles north of the Equator on October 20. Although initially predicted to fail to develop due to its proximity to the Equator, Twenty-Two became a meteorological enigma when it strengthened into Tropical Storm Stan while headed west-southwest closer to the Equator on October 21. Then, on October 23, Stan became a hurricane while only 60 miles north of the equator, the thirteenth of the season. While headed for extreme northern coastal Brazil, Stan reached winds of 80 mph, Stan's peak at the time. Then, on October 24, Stan made landfall in central Amapa state in Brazil with 75 mph winds, a Category 1 hurricane on Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. After landfall, Stan weakened quickly due to the mountainous terrain, weakening to a tropical storm early on October 25, and then to a tropical depression that evening. Early on October 26, Stan degenerated into an open wave over eastern Suriname.

Stan was not over. Over the western Caribbean Sea, Stan regenerated into a tropical depression on October 29, and regained tropical storm status early the next morning. As Stan approached the Yucatan peninsula, favorable conditions allowed the storm to continue intensifying, and Stan was a hurricane again by November 1. Starting that evening, Stan steadily intensified, becoming a Category 2 hurricane on November 2, and a Category 3 hurricane--which made Stan the eighth major hurricane of the season--on November 3. Stan was only a major hurricane very briefly, as the hurricane came ashore on the island of Cozumel at peak intensity. As Stan began slowing down just prior to landfall, passing over Cozumel allowed the storm to weaken, and Stan had downgraded to a Category 2 hurricane with 105-110 mph winds at the time of its third landfall north of Cancun. Moving very slowly over the Yucatan peninsula, Stan quickly weakened, dropping to a weak tropical storm by the time the storm exited the peninsula early on November 5. Stan failed to strengthen much before its final landfall north of South Padre Island, Texas on November 6 with 45 mph winds. Stan caused little damage in Texas, which can be attributed to Stan being a weak storm at the time of impact, moving quickly through the area. Weakening to a tropical depression over Texas, Stan degenerated over extreme southern Oklahoma, this time with no hope of regeneration due to any conditions suitable for development being over 1,000 miles to the east, a direction which Stan was not heading for. Stan's remnants caused minor to moderate damage in midwestern United States and Canada. Damage was worst along the Mississippi River valley, where heavy rain from Stan set the stage for moderate flooding by the river and numerous tributaries.

Because major population centers were spared the worst of the storm, Stan failed to be a billion-dollar storm, causing $850 million (1985 USD) in damage, mostly in Mexico; damage from Stan in the United States was minor, and property damage figures from Brazil are unavailable. However, Stan caused considerable damage to trees in the Amazon rainforest, totaling approximately $25 million (1985 USD) in damage. Initially, Stan was considered a strong Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. However, post-season analysis discovered that Stan was very briefly a Category 3 major hurricane just before landfall in Mexico. Aside from $850 million (1985 USD) in damage, Stan was also responsible for 52 deaths across its path, mostly in Brazil.

Hurricane Stan set numerous records. Passing only 60 miles north of the equator at one point, Stan is the southernmost Atlantic tropical cyclone on record, and second-southernmost worldwide, only behind Typhoon Fay of the the previous year's Pacific typhoon season, which got 20 miles closer to the equator than Hurricane Stan. Stan also set the record for southernmost Atlantic hurricane by reaching hurricane strength at this latitude. It is also the only Atlantic hurricane to make landfall in Brazil on Planet Ceres, and is therefore the southernmost Atlantic hurricane landfall. Stan was also the first major hurricane on record to strike the island of Cozumel directly; the feat would not be matched until the stronger Hurricane Dennis in 1999 made landfall. The name Stan was retired after this season, due to the economical damage in Brazil and Mexico.

Tropical Storm Tina

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Tropical Storm Zeta 2005.jpg
Duration October 22October 28
Intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min) 997 mbar (hPa; 29.44 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Storm Tina (1985)

Tina formed from disorganized Tropical Depression Twenty-Three just north of the Leeward Islands on October 22. After lingering erratically near the islands for three days, Tina was picked up by a trough, which steered Tina to the northwest toward Bermuda. After passing just west of the island on October 27, Tina organized to reach a peak of 60 mph winds. However, Tina weakened over cooler waters and on October 28, Tina became extratropical. Damage from Tina is estimated at $10 million (1985 USD), and the storm was responsible for 10 deaths.




Hurricane Victor

Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Gustav 30 Aug 2008 1605z.jpg
Duration October 30November 9
Intensity 150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min) 941 mbar (hPa; 27.79 inHg)

Main article: Hurricane Victor

On October 30, a tropical disturbance east of the Windward Islands became Tropical Depression Twenty-Four. Although hostile conditions initially prevented the depression from strengthening, the system entered a more favorable environment just prior to crossing into the eastern Caribbean Sea, and became Tropical Storm Victor on November 1 just as it crossed St. Vincent with 40 mph winds. Although Victor weakened to a tropical depression over the island due to mountainous terrain, Victor was able to regain tropical storm strength on November 2 encountering favorable conditions in the eastern Caribbean region. As Victor headed in the general direction of Jamaica, Victor continued to strengthen, and on November 3, Victor strengthened into the fourteenth hurricane of the season that evening. Victor continued to steadily intensify, reaching Category 2 intensity on November 4. Then, on November 5, Victor rapidly intensified just prior to hitting Jamaica, and by the evening, the time of Victor's impact, Hurricane Victor had exploded into a very powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale; it is quite rare for a November storm to reach such an intensity. That evening, Victor made landfall near Portmore, Jamaica with 140 mph winds. Despite the mountainous terrain, Victor weakened only slightly to 135 mph winds upon exiting Jamaica. Then, on November 6, Victor attained peak winds of 150 mph as it roared into Guacimal, Cuba. Although sustained winds dropped to 140 mph over land, and further to 135 mph offshore, Victor remained a Category 4 hurricane until just prior to the storm's first United States landfall in Florida near Lealman on November 7, when Victor weakened to winds of 130 mph--a Category 3 hurricane--just before landfall. This made Victor the second major hurricane of the season to strike Florida (the first was Hurricane Percy), making the 1985 season the first season on record on Planet Ceres during which two major hurricanes struck the same U.S. state.

Because the worst of Hurricane Victor was inflicted on the metro Tampa area, damages from Victor in Florida alone soared to $8.3 billion (1985 USD), $7.9 billion (1985 USD) of which were in the Tampa area, displacing Hurricane Percy of the previous month as the costliest Atlantic hurricane on record on Planet Ceres. After inflicting extreme damage in Florida, Victor would not make landfall again, although it very nearly encountered Buxton, North Carolina as a weak Category 2 hurricane on November 8. On November 9, whilst still a Category 1 hurricane, Victor became extratropical offshore New England.

Hurricane Victor caused catastrophic damage in more areas than one. In Haiti, although the hurricane missed landfall there completely, Victor was a large hurricane, so its outer rainbands were able to affect the country. The heavy rain only exacerbated the destruction from Hurricanes Heffer and Percy; a total of 55 people perished due to dam breaks, with 63 more deaths from other causes within Haiti. Damage from the storm in Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the United States totaled to $9.8 billion (1985 USD), surpassing the damages from Hurricane Percy, the previous Atlantic costliest on Planet Ceres, by $2.2 billion (1985 USD). The name Victor was retired after this season, due to the extreme damage in Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and Florida, as well as the high death toll in the former of these areas.

Tropical Storm Wendy

Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Ts delta 112405.jpg
Duration November 12November 17
Intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min) 980 mbar (hPa; 28.94 inHg)

Main article: Tropical Storm Wendy (1985)

Tropical Storm Wendy formed out of a tropical depression, Tropical Depression Twenty-Five, on November 12 near the Cape Verde islands. Traveling slowly through the archipelago, Wendy reached peak winds of 70 mph near Santo Antao, just under hurricane strength; Wendy was initially forecast to reach hurricane strength, but a sudden change in direction took Wendy over Santo Antao early on November 15, where the mountainous terrain weakened Wendy slightly. As Wendy left the Cape Verde archipelago, the storm continued to weaken as a combined result of wind shear and cooler waters. On the evening of November 17, Wendy became extratropical. The extratropical remnant skimmed the Canary Islands before striking the southwestern United Kingdom.

Wendy left 21 dead and $336 million (1985 USD) in damage, plus an additional $5 million (1985 USD) done in its extratropical phase. Although damage was extensive in most areas, Cape Verde did not request the retirement of the name Wendy, although the name has not been used since due to insufficient tropical activity. The naming of Wendy exhausted the season's naming list, the first time on Planet Ceres this has ever happened in the Atlantic basin.

Subtropical Storm Three

Subtropical storm

 (SSHS)

Unnamed subtropical storm (2005).jpg
Duration November 30December 3
Intensity 55 mph (85 km/h) (1-min) 992 mbar (hPa; 29.29 inHg)

Although Tropical Storm Wendy was the 1985 season's final tropical cyclone, one more subtropical cyclone would form. On November 30, the last day of the season, Subtropical Storm Three formed east of Bermuda. Moving northeast, the storm reached peak winds of 55 mph early on December 2 before becoming extratropical on December 3, ending the season three days after the official end of the season, without affecting land. Technically, Subtropical Storm Three was not a post-season storm because it actually formed on the last day of the season, although its extension into December made the 1985 season to have both pre-season and post-season activity in over 50 years.

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Rating

ACE (104 kt2) – Storm: Source
1 56.13 Dylan 12 8.00 Stan
2 32.82 Bob 13 5.89 Wendy
3 32.67 Elena 14 3.25 Karen
4 27.88 Heffer 15 3.21 Tina
5 27.73 Percy 16 2.76 Isabel
6 22.10 Filburt 17 2.51 Norbert
7 17.84 Victor 18 1.42 Alicia
8 14.27 Lazlo 19 1.12 Chloe
9 14.20 Minerva 20 0.528 Gloria
10   12.01 Jerry 21 0.392 Olivia
11   10.11 Rita
Total=296.84 (297)

ACE is the result of a storm's winds multiplied by how long it lasted for, so storms that lasted a long time (like Bob, Dylan, Filburt, and Percy), as well as particularly strong hurricanes (like Dylan, Elena, Heffer, Percy, and Victor), have higher ACE totals. 1985 was extraordinarily active in these terms; with an ACE total of 297, the ACE of the 1985 season was higher than any other Atlantic hurricane season on Planet Ceres. The 1985 season also holds the record for the most storms with an ACE higher than 20, six (Bob, Dylan, Elena, Filburt, Heffer, and Percy). With an ACE of 56.13, Hurricane Dylan is one of the few Atlantic hurricanes on Planet Ceres with an ACE exceeding 50. Since subtropical storms are not included in season totals, the 1985 Mother's Day Subtropical Storm and Subtropical Storm Three are omitted from the season's ACE.









Season Effects

This season was one of the deadliest ever on Planet Ceres. Over 16,000 people lost their lives this season, a number only surpassed by the 1993 and 2003 seasons. Also, Hurricanes Heffer, Percy, and Victor combined to inflict $24.7 billion (1985 USD) in damage, another new record. Deaths in parentheses are indirect, but still storm-related.

1985 Planet Ceres Atlantic Hurricane Season statistics
Storm Name Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max Wind

(mph)

Min. Press.(mbar) Landfall(s) Damage (millions USD) Deaths
Where When Wind

(mph)

Mother's Day May 1114 Template:TC stats sstorm desc 60 977 N/A

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Alicia June 38 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 80 983 1.42

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Two June 2021 Template:TC stats depression desc 35 1007 0.00

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Bob July 321 Template:TC stats cat3 desc 130 933 32.84

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Chloe July 1114 Tropical Storm 50 1000 1.12

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Dylan July 15August 11 Template:TC stats cat4 desc 145 930 56.13

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Elena July 1930 Template:TC stats cat4 desc 155 930 32.70

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Seven July 2426 Template:TC stats depression desc 35 1010 0.00

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Filburt July 28August 15 Template:TC stats cat3 desc 115 961 22.7

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Gloria August 29September 1 Tropical Storm 45 1001 0.528

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Two September 24 Template:TC stats sdepression desc 35 992 0.00

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Isabel September 49 Tropical Storm 70 990 2.76

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Heffer September 516 Template:TC stats cat5 desc 180 896 27.00

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Jerry September 1118 Template:TC stats cat2 desc 105 978 12.01

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Karen September 1218 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 75 990 2.03

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Lazlo September 1220 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 80 985 5.95

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Minerva September 1826 Template:TC stats cat3 desc 125 95 25.1

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Nineteen September 30October 2 Template:TC stats depression desc 35 1009 0.00

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Stan October 15 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 80 977 2.36

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Unnamed October 45 Tropical Storm 50 997 0.00

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Tammy October 56 Tropical Storm 50 1001 0.81

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Twenty-two October 810 Template:TC stats depression desc 35 1009 0.00

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Vince October 811 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 75 988 1.66

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Wilma October 1525 Template:TC stats cat5 desc 185 882 (record) 39.0

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats next landfall Template:TC stats impact

Alpha October 2224 Tropical Storm 50 998 0.65

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Beta October 2631 Template:TC stats cat3 desc 115 962 6.47

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Gamma November 1321 Tropical Storm 50 1001 1.33

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Delta November 2328 Tropical Storm 70 980 5.41

Template:TC stats first landfall Template:TC stats impact

Epsilon November 29December 8 Template:TC stats cat1 desc 85 989 13.4

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact

Zeta December 29January 6, 2006 Tropical Storm 65 994 6.27

Template:TC stats no landfall Template:TC stats impact Template:TC stats table end

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