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2020 Pacific hurricane season

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2024 Pacific hurricane season

2020 Pacific hurricane season
First storm formed April 26
Last storm dissipated December 25
Strongest storm Rick, 200 mph
Total storms 30
Hurricanes 19
Major hurricanes 14
Total damages 12.0 billion
Total fatalities 56,000,000
I will work on this season, but for now, I will do a few storms, then I will keep going. The first storm was Aaron, the first hurricane to make landfall on the Baja California Peninsula. Tropical Storm Blanca made landfall in Mexico and played a role in Atlantic hurricane Dennis' formation. A spree of major hurricanes formed after. The next storm was Chris, a hurricane that made landfall in Mexico as a strong Category 4. Danielle became the first Category five hurricane since Hurricane Kirk in 2015. Hurricane Erian turned into a strong Category 2 force wind extratropical storm. Hurricane Frances was a strong Category 4 that formed off the coast of Mexico.

Hurricane Guillermo became a Category 5 hurricane with winds of 175 mph (280 km/h), but a high pressure of 919 mbar.








Storms

Category 2 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane hector 2006.jpg Hurricane Aaron 1-E.png
Duration April 26 – April 31
Intensity 105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min) 971 mbar (hPa; 28.67 inHg)

Hurricane Aaron

Tropical Depression One-E formed in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Under favorable conditions, it organized into a tropical storm and was named Aaron. Aaron intensified into a hurricane and reached peak of 105 mph (165 km/h). Aaron unexpectedly turned northeast and made landfall on the Baja Calfornia Peninsula as a weak Category 2 hurricane, the first hurricane to make landfall on the peninsula since Hurricane Jimena of 2009. Aaron re-entered the Pacific as a weakened storm and dissipated on May 10.















Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

2-C 29 August 2009.jpg TDOne 1-C.png
Duration May 3 – May 5
Intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min) 1009 mbar (hPa; 29.8 inHg)

Tropical Depression One-C

A low entered the Central Pacific. It developed into a depression on May 15. It quickly entered the Western Pacific on May 16.















Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Rick 2009 Oct 14 1445Z.PNG Tropical Storm Blanca 2-E.png
Duration May 14 – May 17
Intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min) 989 mbar (hPa; 29.21 inHg)

Tropical Storm Blanca

A well organized low moved off Mexico. NHC immediately designated the storm as Tropical Depression Two-E. It rapidly organized and was named Blanca. Blanca rapidly intensified, but made landfall too soon to become a hurricane. The remnants of Blanca became Tropical Depression Four and later, Dennis.















Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Ileana 23 aug 2006 1750Z.jpg Hurricane Chris 3-E.png
Duration May 19 – May 25
Intensity 150 mph (240 km/h) (1-min) 925 mbar (hPa; 27.32 inHg)

Hurricane Chris

A vigorous low formed near the southwest coast of Mexico. It became more organized, and was declared Tropical Depression Three-E 45 miles west of Acapulco. Starting to move west-northwest, it became a tropical storm and was named Chris. Chris began to explosively intensify, and reached Category 3 status 560 miles from Baja California. Chris continued to strengthen and became the strongest storm of the season by reaching peak winds of 150 mph (240 km/h). Chris turned to the northeast and made landfall in Baja California. Entering the Gulf of California, it dissipated.














Category 5 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane daniel 2006.jpg Hurricane Danielle 4-E.png
Duration May 28 – June 9
Intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min) 909 mbar (hPa; 26.84 inHg)

Hurricane Danielle

A low moved off the coast of Mexico and became Tropical Depression Four-E. Continuing west, it was named Danielle. Danielle strengthened rapidly throughout the day to become a Category 3 hurricane. Danielle continued to strengthen and reached peak intensity as a Category 5 hurricane with winds of 160 mph (260 km/h). Danielle became a annular hurricane, staying as a Category 5 hurricane for another 3 days. In that period, Danielle's pressure rapidly dropped to 909 mbar, making Danielle the 3rd strongest hurricane in the Pacific. Danielle's strength began to flunctuate as it moved north. Danielle passed 33 miles north of Hawaii, and became extratropical.















Category 3 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Darby (2004).jpg Hurricane Erian 5-E.png
Duration June 13 – June 17
Intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min) 948 mbar (hPa; 27.99 inHg)

Hurricane Erian

Only 4 days after Hurricane Danielle dissipated, Tropical Depression Five-E formed 885 miles south from the Baja California Peninsula. It organized and was named Erian. Nearly moving north, it intensified under favorable conditions, and it became a hurricane off the coast of Mexico. Erian entrained dry air and weakened into a tropical storm, however, this was short lived, as a eye developed. Erian reached a peak of 120 mph (195 km/h) before becoming less organized traveling northwest. A extratropical storm fused with Erian to become "Extratropical Storm 90EC Erian". It had the designation as 90EC because it existed in the East and Central Pacific.




















Category 2 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Unnamed Hurricane (1975).PNG Storm 90EC.png
Duration June 20 – June 23
Intensity 105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min) 964 mbar (hPa; 28.47 inHg)

Extratropical Storm 90EC (Erian)

Remnants of former Hurricane Erian fused with an extratropical storm. It was designated as Storm 90EC, showing that it's from the East and Central Pacific. It's dvorak numbers were 5.0, making it's peak winds of 105 mph (165 km/h). 90EC continued north and was absorbed by a gigantic front.















Tropical storm

 (SSHS)

Lana 1 August 2009.jpg Tropical Storm Eka 2-C.png
Duration June 26 – June 29
Intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min) 985 mbar (hPa; 29.09 inHg)

Tropical Storm Eka

A new depression formed in the Central Pacific. It organized into Tropical Storm Eka the next day. Tropical Storm Eka waned and waxed in intensification almost the whole day. Eka reached it's peak of 70 mph (110 km/h). Eka unexpectedly turned north, and passed the Big Island. Eka continued north and dissipated.















Tropical depression

 (SSHS)

Tropical Depression Nine-E 2009-08-09 1830Z.jpg Tropical Depression Six-E 6-E.png
Duration June 30 – July 1
Intensity 30 mph (45 km/h) (1-min) 1005 mbar (hPa; 29.68 inHg)

Tropical Depression Six-E

A weak tropical low formed roughly 650 miles south-southwest of Baja California. It became better organized, and was designated Tropical Depression Six-E. It was predicted to become a strong hurricane, but shear from another depression that would later be Hurricane Frances caused it's circulation to be destroyed. NHC monitored it's remnants until it degraded into a trough.













Category 4 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Hurricane Juliette 25 sept 2001 1407Z.jpg
Duration June 30 – July 6
Intensity 155 mph (250 km/h) (1-min) 912 mbar (hPa; 26.93 inHg)

Hurricane Frances

A tropical wave developed two tropical depressions on July 30. Six-E was destroyed by Seven-E which became Tropical Storm Frances later that day. Frances rapidly intensified from a 40 mph tropical storm to a 145 mph Category 4 hurricane in the space of 20 hours. Frances continued to intensify to become the 4th strongest Pacific hurricane on record with a pressure of 912 mbar. Frances held on to this strength until landfall the next day on the Baja California Peninsula. Frances rapidly decayed into a remnant low and caused flooding in the South United States.












Category 5 hurricane

 (SSHS)

Guillermo 05 aug 1997 2212Z.jpg
Duration July 8 – July 16
Intensity 175 mph (280 km/h) (1-min) 919 mbar (hPa; 27.14 inHg)

Hurricane Guillermo

Tropical Depression Eight-E formed out over the warm waters of the Pacific, nearly in the same area Danielle became a hurricane in. Eight-E quickly became Guillermo, the 7th named storm. Following the rapid intensfication rate of it's predessors, Guillermo became a hurricane.

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