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DTSE 2007: Lesson 1.3

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NESTED STRUCTURE 1

Lesson 1.3

TITLE: Cancer Tumors

INTRODUCTION:

Given their diagnosis of cancer in the previous lesson and the finding of tumors in the case file, students will build on their understanding of tumors in this lesson. Many students have misconceptions about cancer tumors. This class will start with a class discussion analyzing what they think a tumor is made up of. After this brief discussion students will be asked to look up the definition of tumor on the computer. In groups of 4, they will construct a thorough definition of the word tumor that they will be able to use as a reference for the rest of the unit.

OBJECTIVE:

1. Students will have to use and understand the concept of cell theory to learn that tumors consist of cells that are undergoing uncontrolled cell division. This will reinforce the idea that cells are the basic unit of life.

2. Students will understand that cells come from other cells through a process called cell division.

3. Students will use various reliable sources to solve their assignment not really a goal

STUDENT PRECONCEPTIONS:

There seems to be a trend of misconceptions that students have when understanding what tumors are comprised of. Many students are under the impression that tumors are made various things such as veins, blood, sacs of puss, etc. and therefore are confused that tumors are actually made up of many, many cells.

STANDARDS:

The purpose of this lesson is to help students towards understanding the information in the following standards:

NSES-National Science Education Standards (NRC) Content Standard C:

The cells multiply and differentiate to form the many specialized cells, tissues and organs that comprise the final organism.

Project 2061 C. Cells

Complex interactions among the different kinds of molecules in the cell cause distinct cycles of activities, such as growth and division what is the designation of this standard (cells, etc usually they have a letter and number like 5a)

MATERIALS:

1. 2-3 students per computer

2. Blackboard or whiteboard

3. Classroom conducive for discussion

PREPARATION:

1. Ensure that computers have internet access.

TIME: One 30-minute class period

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS:

Depending on teacher resources the materials used to present information can vary. Instructor can also specify what sources students are to use (eg: medical dictionary, biology textbook etc.) Instructor can also specify if students are to include the terms benign and malignant.

ACTIVITIES:

The main focus for this lesson is to develop student understanding of tumor composition and it’s relation to cancer.

1. The teacher should begin class with a recap of the summaries each student comprised the day before about their observations of the cancer pictures. The purpose of this discussion is to see where the students’ understandings are and begin introducing the topic of tumors and their relation to cancer. Guiding Questions: “What are the differences in appearance between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue?” “What is a tumor?”

2. Break the class up into groups of 4 and allow each group access to a computer. Instruct each group to search the internet for a definition of the word tumor. Allow 5 minutes.

3. Have each group put their definition of the word tumor up on the front board and then through another discussion come to a class consensus which one is best. Make sure the meaning of the definition and the reasoning behind the final choice is clearly understood by the class. Example: An abnormal mass of tissue that results from excessive cell division. Tumors perform no useful body function. They may be benign (not cancerous) or malignant. They can be malignant (cancerous), which means they will grow rapidly and spread to other parts of the body or cause more tumors to form elsewhere, or be benign, which means that they will generally grow much more slowly and stay put in one area.

4. Have each student write down the class definition in their notebook to be used for the rest of the unit.

ASSESSMENT:

Students must have a complete understanding of cell theory- that cells are the basic unit of life and that all cells come from pre-existing cells. Students should have the ability to search and find reliable sources of information and as a group come to a consensus on their definition of a tumor. Quiz on Cell Theory


Supplementary Materials:

1. Quiz on Cell Theory

2. Definition of the word tumor:

An abnormal mass of cells within a multicellular organism. They can interfere with vital body functions and absorb nutrients needed elsewhere. They can be malignant (cancerous), which means they will grow rapidly and spread to other parts of the body or cause more tumors to form elsewhere, or be benign, which means that they will generally grow much more slowly and stay put in one area.
 www.cytokinetics.com/cyto/glossary An abnormal mass of tissue that results from excessive cell division. Tumors perform no useful body function. They may be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).
 www.americanbrachytherapy.org/aboutBrachytherapy/glossary.cfm


Quiz on Cell Theory:

1. Cell Theory states that:

  • a. all cells have a nucleus
  • b. all living things are composed of cells
  • c. all cells are microscopic in size
  • d. all cells are photosynthetic
  • e. all of the above


2. What is a tumor? Where can tumors grow?




3. Where do tumor cells come from?



4. Hypothetically you slice your finger while cutting vegetables. How do you get more cells on your arm to cover the cut (replace the cut cells)?



5. What is the human body made of ?

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