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Dhammapada

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Tipitaka » Sutta Pitaka » Khuddaka Nikaya

Introduction

The Dhammapada (Pali, translates as Path of the Dharma. Also Prakrit Dhamapada, Sanskrit Dharmapada) is a Buddhist religious scripture, containing 423 verses in 26 categories. According to tradition, these are answers to questions put to the Buddha on various occasions, most of which deal with ethics. A fifth century commentary by Buddhaghosa includes 305 stories which give context to the verses.

The Dhammapada is a popular section of the Pali Tipitaka and is considered one of the most important pieces of Theravada literature.

Although the Pali edition is the most well known, a Gandhari edition written in Kharosthi and a seemingly related text in Sanskrit known as the Udanavarga have also been discovered.

The Categories

  1. Yamakavagga: The Pairs (verses 1-20)
  2. Appamadavagga: Heedfulness (21-32)
  3. Cittavagga: The Mind (33-43)
  4. Pupphavagga: Flowers (44-59)
  5. Balavagga: The Fool (60-75)
  6. Panditavagga: The Wise (76-89)
  7. Arahantavagga: The Arahant (90-99)
  8. Sahassavagga: Thousands (100-115)
  9. Papavagga: Evil (116-128)
  10. Dandavagga: Violence (129-145)
  11. Jaravagga: Old Age (146-156)
  12. Attavagga: The Self (157-166)
  13. Lokavagga: The World (167-178)
  14. Buddhavagga: The Buddha (179-196)
  15. Sukhavagga: Happiness (197-208)
  16. Piyavagga: Affection (209-220)
  17. Kodhavagga: Anger (221-234)
  18. Malavagga: Impurity (235-255)
  19. Dhammatthavagga: The Just (256-272)
  20. Maggavagga: The Path (273-289)
  21. Pakinnakavagga: Miscellany (290-305)
  22. Nirayavagga: Hell (306-319)
  23. Nagavagga: Elephants (320-333)
  24. Tanhavagga: Craving (334-359)
  25. Bhikkhuvagga: Monks (360-382)
  26. Brahmanavagga: Brahmans (383-423)

Reference

Dhammapada: Significance

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