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Diamond & Pearl
(Pokémon Trading Card Game)
DP Logo
Diamond & Pearl logo
Cards in set 130
Expansion Code DP
Set number Seventeen (By Pokémon USA)
Release Date May 28, 2007
Preceding Set EX Power Keepers
Following Set Mysterious Treasures
Included in the 2006-2007 Modified Format
Included in the 2007-2008 Modified Format


Pokémon TCG: Diamond & Pearl is the seventeenth Pokémon TCG set released by Pokémon USA. The set is the first in English-language territories to include fourth-generation Pokémon; namely, those that first featured in the Pokémon Diamond and Pearl video games on the Nintendo DS.

Types of Pokémon

Pokémon Lv.X

Pokémon Lv.X are a new type of card introduced in Diamond & Pearl. evolve from Pokémon of the same name, but as they have the same name only four in any combination are allowed in a deck. For example, 4 Turtwig are allowed, 4 Grotle are allowed, 2 Torterra are allowed, and 2 Torterra Lv.X are allowed. Torterra can be evolved into Torterra Lv.X - but a Pokémon Lv.X can only be played on an Active Pokémon.

Changes in the new series

The card

DP-01 008 Magnezone

Magnezone

Several changes have been made to the format of the cards; some of these changes were included on previous card formats, and others and brand new.

The card design has been changed due to the shift from the EX Series. This is the fifth card design, after design for Base Set to Base Set 2 (and Legendary Collection), Neo Genesis to Neo Destiny, Expedition to Skyridge, and EX Ruby & Sapphire to EX Power Keepers.

The cards also see the return of several pieces of information seen previously: The Pokémon's level; Pokédex data, such as National Pokédex number, species, height and weight; and Pokédex flavour text. The card design is also more similar to previous designs.

The mechanics

All types of Pokémon cards now have some new mechanics which will affect gameplay in some cases.

Some Basic, and rarely Stage 1, Pokémon now have attacks which can be used without any Energy cards having to be attached to the Pokémon. These attacks usually are considered to do very little damage or have a limited effect.

The weakness and resistance mechanic has also been changed for the first time. Previously, weakness caused an attack to do double the damage, and resistance caused an attack to do thirty less damage. Now, the weakness and resistance varies for every Pokémon, and usually has more effect for stronger Pokémon.

There are also new mechanics to Trainer cards. Originally, Supporter cards and Stadium cards fell under the category or Trainer cards, along with Technical Machines, Pokémon Tools and other types of Trainer. Now, however, Supporter card and Stadium card are separate categories alongside Trainer card. Technical Machines, Pokémon Tools and others still fall under Trainer card.

Two new Basic Energy cards have also been released - Darkness Energy and Metal Energy will be produced as basic Energy cards as well as Special Energy cards as of Diamond & Pearl.

The rules

DP-01 017 Torterra

Torterra

As well as changes to the card design, major changes to the Pokémon Trading Card Game rules have been made.

A rule change in 2003 meant that the player taking the first inital turn could not draw a card; however, that rule change has been withdrawn, and a card must be drawn at the start of every round.

With the debut of Supporter cards in 2003, these cards could not be played on the first inital turn. Now that Supporter card is a separate type of Trainer card, this rule has been extended to include all categories and types of Trainer cards. This includes Fossils (Mysterious, Claw, Root, Shield and Helmet).

Also, Fossil cards can now be played during the setup phase before the first initial turn, but only if a Basic Pokémon can be played as well. Also, knocking out a Fossil card no longer counts as a free KO, and the player must draw a Prize card for knocking one out. This does not apply if a played chooses to withdraw their Fossil card.

Weakness and resistance mechanic changes do not apply for any Pokémon cards prior to Diamond & Pearl, so all Pokémon card printed before the set's release follow the original Weakness x2 and Resistance -30 rulings.

Special Energy variations of Darkness and Metal Energy still allow for the same ruling on the card as before. The new basic Energy variations have no ruling and should not be treated as though they do.

Also, in a 30-card deck, only two copies of a card (except basic Energy) are allowed instead of the previous four. 60-card decks are still allowed up to four copies of a card.

Set List

In the English-language version of the set, Diamond & Pearl cards are listed by set number (there are 130 cards in the set). However, in place of the nine-digit code carried by EX Series cards, the DP series holds the card's same DPBP number as the Japanese version of the card.

Holographic
  • 1/130 Dialga
  • 2/130 Dusknoir
  • 3/130 Electivire
  • 4/130 Empoleon
  • 5/130 Infernape
  • 6/130 Lucario
  • 7/130 Luxray
  • 8/130 Magnezone
  • 9/130 Manaphy
  • 10/130 Mismagius
  • 11/130 Palkia
  • 12/130 Rhyperior
  • 13/130 Roserade
  • 14/130 Shiftry
  • 15/130 Skuntank
  • 16/130 Staraptor
  • 17/130 Torterra
Rare
  • 18/130 Azumarill
  • 19/130 Beautifly
  • 20/130 Bibarel
  • 21/130 Carnivine
  • 22/130 Clefable
  • 23/130 Drapion
  • 24/130 Drifblim
  • 25/130 Dustox
  • 26/130 Floatzel
  • 27/130 Gengar
  • 28/130 Heracross
  • 29/130 Hippowdon
  • 30/130 Lopunny
  • 31/130 Machamp
  • 32/130 Medicham
  • 33/130 Munchlax
  • 34/130 Noctowl
  • 35/130 Pachirisu
  • 36/130 Purugly
  • 37/130 Snorlax
  • 38/130 Steelix
  • 39/130 Vespiquen
  • 40/130 Weavile
  • 41/130 Wobbuffet
  • 42/130 Wynaut

Uncommon
  • 43/130 Budew
  • 44/130 Cascoon
  • 45/130 Cherrim
  • 46/130 Drifloon
  • 47/130 Dusclops
  • 48/130 Elekid
  • 49/130 Grotle
  • 50/130 Haunter
  • 51/130 Hippopotas
  • 52/130 Luxio
  • 53/130 Machoke
  • 54/130 Magneton
  • 55/130 Mantyke
  • 56/130 Monferno
  • 57/130 Nuzleaf
  • 58/130 Prinplup
  • 59/130 Rapidash
  • 60/130 Rhydon
  • 61/130 Riolu
  • 62/130 Seaking
  • 63/130 Silcoon
  • 64/130 Staravia
  • 65/130 Unown A
  • 66/130 Unown B
  • 67/130 Unown C
  • 68/130 Unown D

Common
  • 69/130 Azurill
  • 70/130 Bidoof
  • 71/130 Bonsly
  • 72/130 Buizel
  • 73/130 Buneary
  • 74/130 Chatot
  • 75/130 Cherubi
  • 76/130 Chimchar
  • 77/130 Clefairy
  • 78/130 Cleffa
  • 79/130 Combee
  • 80/130 Duskull
  • 81/130 Electabuzz
  • 82/130 Gastly
  • 83/130 Glameow
  • 84/130 Goldeen
  • 85/130 Hoothoot
  • 86/130 Machop
  • 87/130 Magnemite
  • 88/130 Marill
  • 89/130 Meditite
  • 90/130 Mime Jr.
  • 91/130 Misdreavus
  • 92/130 Onix
  • 93/130 Piplup
  • 94/130 Ponyta
  • 95/130 Rhyhorn
  • 96/130 Roselia
  • 97/130 Seedot
  • 98/130 Shinx
  • 99/130 Skorupi
  • 100/130 Sneasel
  • 101/130 Starly
  • 102/130 Stunky
  • 103/130 Turtwig
  • 104/130 Wurmple

Trainers
  • 105/130 Double Full Heal
  • 106/130 Energy Restore
  • 107/130 Energy Switch
  • 108/130 Night Pokemon Center
  • 109/130 PlusPower
  • 110/130 Poke Ball
  • 111/130 Pokedex Handy910
  • 112/130 Professor Rowan
  • 113/130 Rival
  • 114/130 Speed Stadium
  • 115/130 Super Scoop Up
  • 116/130 Warp Point
  • 117/130 Energy Searach
  • 118/130 Potion
  • 119/130 Switch
Pokémon Lv.X
  • 120/130 Empoleon
  • 121/130 Infernape
  • 122/130 Torterra
Basic Energy
  • 123/130 Grass Energy
  • 124/130 Fire Energy
  • 125/130 Water Energy
  • 126/130 Lightning Energy
  • 127/130 Psychic Energy
  • 128/130 Fighting Energy
  • 129/130 Darkness Energy
  • 130/130 Metal Energy

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