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 <titolo>Buenos Aires Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Buenos Aires - Out and About ]]] Buenos Aires is the third largest city in South America and is made up of 47 districts, inhabited by approximately 3 million people. These people referred to as Portenos, (Port People) are strongly characterized by their neo-latin language. This complex,energetic and seductive sea-port city was, for centuries, the gateway to Argentina. Favoured for its geographical position, at the mouth of a large river network, it is the departure point for numerous road and rail links. Surrounded by the almost limitless Pampas, this vast urban area is a metropolis open twenty four hours a day. Founded by the Spanish in 1536, it became the capital of Argentina in 1880. During the Colonial Period the city grew, forming square-shaped districts around the Plaza de Mayo, which, even today, still preserves its beautiful colonial centre, where it is possible to admire the XVIII Century buildings in Peruvian Rococo and Portugese style. During the second half of the Eighteenth Century, the city was laid out, according to the french style of the Second Empire, with the formation of wide streets, from which the city radiated out in a semi-circle around the colonial centre, with the river forming the semi-circle’s axis. The roads spanned out and continued along their way through the Pampas. Today’s urban network is a uniformed structure of wide roads (some, like the Avenida de Mayo and the Avenida 9 de Julio, are over 100 metres wide) which intersect at right angles numerous tree-lined squares. The way of life and the architecture here, are more noticeably European, than in any other place in South America. The city districts are small and strongly individual, each one having its own specific colours and shapes. The multi-ethnic inheritance of the city is embodied in its cosmopolitan architecture, where the Spanish Colonial style is placed side by side with the Italian eye for detail and the essentials of French Classicism. The physical structure of Buenos Aires is a varied mosaic, as diverse as the culture of its origins. It is impossible to single out a specific monument that represents the focal point of the city; there are a multitude of small places, each with its own intimate detail, special events and happenings, creating their own slightly different shapes, moods, and character. Glass skyscrapers cast their shadows on the XIX Century Victorian houses, while the tango bars fill with the cigar smoke of their regular customers and the antique shops, rich with numerous treasures, decorate the streets. Wrongly described as an ugly copy of Paris, Buenos Aires possesses an atmosphere rich in character and sophistication, distinctly European set in the heart of South America. The cafés are full of people engaged in lively conversation, elegant and luxurious shops line the streets along which the people stroll. The best way to see the city is on foot, or by bus or the underground (Subte) in order to reach the more out-lying areas of the city. The underground has 5 lines (from A to E). Tokens are used, which can be bought from booths in the stations. Buses (colectivos) which also run at night, are a useful way to travel around within the city limits.There are a large number of black and yellow taxis which can be hailed along the street. The “Remises” are fixed rate taxis, which must be booked in advance. They are cheaper to use when travelling to and from the airport and can be booked by the hotel. The city’s international airport is Ezeiza (47km south-west of the city centre). [[[Buenos Aires - Not to be missed ]]] One of the most important architectural works in the city is the Casa Rosada, the pink coloured Presidential Palace, which occupies the East side of the Plaza de Mayo, famous for its balcony, where such people as General Galtieri, Evita, Juan Peron and even Diego Maradona, have stood and addressed the crowd . Originally a fortress, the Casa Rosada was re-modelled as a palace for the Viceroy, when Buenos Aires became the capital of the River Plata Viceroyalty in 1776. It is a typical example of the influence of Italian and French style, painted shocking pink during the Sarmiento Presidency when, in 1873, he chose this colour because it represented both political parties, the red of the Federals and the white of the Unionists. The Casa Rosada Museum is located underneath the South side of the building. Other notable palaces include The Congress (1906), The Parliament, The Justice (1904) and the Town Hall. Among the noteworthy religious buildings in Colonial style, are the churches of Our Blessed Lady, Saint Ignatius, Saint Dominic, and Saint Francis, all of which were built in and around the XVIII Century. La Boca, a picturesque district, where the city borders the mouth of the river Riachuelo, is famous for its football team, the Boca Juniors and for its small, highly coloured houses, made of wood and corrugated iron. These tiny houses, belonging to the dock workers and sailors from Genova, were made from material stripped from naval wrecks and covered with a rainbow of shades, painted by mural artists ,who followed the initial works of the famous Argentinian painter Benito Quinque la Martine. The most famous street in this area is the Calle Caminito, which has the finest examples of these colourful houses. It was once an important centre for the tango. In the 1920’s, the children of rich families, came here to practise this famous dance, prohibited at that time. Visit the Calle Museum and the Boca Museum of Fine Arts, in Avenida del Libertador 1473. Here you will find the most comprehensive collection of paintings by local and European artists. San Telmo is another historic district, renown for being the district of artists and students. Here it is possible to find the best places, “Tanguerias,” to observe the tango and where you can listen to the best blend of old tango and new jazz . An antique and flea market is held every Sunday in Plaza Dorrego. Lastly, Buenos Aires possesses one of the most important opera houses in the world, the Colòn: its staff are actively involved in the cultural life of the city and if you are willing to lend an ear and share your own stories, they will happily tell you the secrets of this fine city. [[[Buenos Aires - Walks and tours]]] A pleasant break away from the frenzy of Buenos Aires, can be had in the town of Tigre. This town, favoured by the Portenos, is situated on an island in the delta of the Parana river, 30 kilometres from the city. Trains depart regularly for Tigre from the Retiro Station in Buenos Aires and the trip takes about one hour. The focal point of the town is centered around the Estacion Fluvial, where the ships are loaded and unloaded. The town has somewhat lost its elegance, however the area is still appealing for walks and strolls. Regattas are held in March and November. [[[Buenos Aires - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Argentinian Peso Electric supply: 220v 50 Hz C Climate : Temperate. In Summer (Dec- Mar) varies between 19 and 29°C, in Winter (Jun- Aug) between 8 and 15.5°C Language : Spanish(official) Amerind dialect, Guaicuru, Quechua, Tehuelce, English and Italian. Opening hours : The banks and the Bureau of Exchange are open Mon- Fri from 10am-3pm. Offices from 9am to 12pm and 2pm until 7pm Shops from 9/9:30am until 7:30pm (Saturdays 8:30/9am until 12.30/1pm), but in the outskirts and the busier zones, they usually close at mid-day and extend the afternoon opening hours. Cafès, cake shops and pizza restaurants, almost always open, only close between 2 and 6 am Restaurants: lunch is served from 1pm and dinner from 9pm Telephones : The public phones use a phone card and tokens (cospeles), which can be purchased from newsagents and the telephone company offices. There are also cash phones( in Buenos Aires at Corrientes 707, and San Martin 640 both of which are open 24 hours a day) [[[Buenos Aires - A pocket guide]]] Buenos Aires is a city where it is possible to tranquilly stroll around and benefit from the many night time entertainments that it has to offer: theatres, operas, open-air concerts, tango shows, films in their original language and discotheques open until dawn, to suit every age and taste. For those interested in shopping, there is an embarrassingly extensive choice: in Calle Florida, Avenida Santa Fè y Cabildo, the Once district, Plaza Flores, in the shopping centre</testo> 
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 <titolo>Adelaide Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Adelaide - Out and About]]] Adelaide is the capital of the South-East Zone of the country, located in the middle of a fertile valley, at the mouth of the river Torrens. The city lies on a coastal plain, 12 km from the East Bank of the Saint Vincent Gulf. The city has 1,071,100 inhabitants, located mainly in and around the city centre. Adelaide was founded in the first half of the 18th century, by English Nobles of the South Australian Association, who wished to create an exclusive enclave. Adelaide stands on both banks of the river. It was built to a precise urban plan, in order to create an “English Garden City” . Adelaide is a city that has to be savoured slowly by its visitors. It is easy to travel around and discover. The streets, which intersect at right angles , create a square -grid formation around the two main centres: the retail and shopping centre, which is located South of the river and the residential and industrial centre in the North. The city is laid out in an orderly and tidy manner, with wide tree-lined streets and ample public spaces and parks. A green belt of enormous eucalyptus trees, forms a natural barrier separating the centre from the suburbs. The suburbs are a tranquil and conservative area,with sober and elegant architecture,dominated by space and light. The intersection of North Terrace with King William Street, forms the most important crossroads in Adelaide. From here, with only a few minutes walk, it is possible to find all the major attractions of the city. The museums and art galleries are concentrated around North Terrace, which also boasts a botanical garden, casino,and railway station. North Terrace is also the location of Ayer’s House, a castle built in 1846; The Old Parliament House, one of the oldest houses in the city and now the site of the Museum of the Constituion and The Festival Centre, site of the most impotant Australian Artistic Fesitival, which is held biannually. The Governors Palace, built in 1840 and surrounded by picturesque gardens, is only a short distance from North Terrace. Adelaide is the official seat of the Archbishop and is the site of Trinity Chuch, the first Anglican church in Southern Australia. Saint Peter’s Cathedral, built in 1876, stands near the panoramic view-point of Montefiore Hill. Rundle street is the city’s main street, its pedestrian area runs from King William Street to Pulteney Street and is lined with shops, cafés and restaurants. Adelaide is an easy city to travel around, with buses and trains being the most frequently used means of transport. However, there is a tram service that provides a service that links Victoria Square, in the city centre to the seaside suburbs of Glenelg. Train, tram and bus timetables are available from Trans Adelaide offices. Tickets can be bought directly on board the buses and trams ,or from newsagents in the centre or out-lying areas. Automatic ticket- vending machines are located at the Adelaide railway station or at the STA office, on the corner of King William Street and Currie Street. From Victoria Square, it is possible to catch the free “Bee Line” bus service, which runs through the main shopping areas following the route: King Willliam Street, via North Terrace to George Street, returning via Hindley Street, West Terrace, North Terrace and King Willliam Street. The buses depart every ten minutes, from those bus stops which have a bee painted upon them, Monday to Thursday from 8am to 6pm, Friday from 8am to 7pm, Saturday from 8am to 5pm. Adelaide is the departure point of the transcontinental railway, which crosses the whole country, passing through Alice Springs in the Northern Territory and finally finishing in Darwin. [[[Adelaide - Not to be missed]]] Adelaide is a large cultural centre and hosts many internationally important festivals. It has a university, further education facilities(mining and agricultural research) and various museums. The Museum of Classical Archaeology, The South Australian Museum, a natural history museum, with the world’s largest collection of Aboriginal hand-made crafts and tools, The South Australian Museum of Art, which hosts Australian and international exhibitions and The Museum of Immigration , which provides its visitors with a cross-sectional history of this region. [[[Adelaide - Walks and tours]]] Adelaide is ideally situated in a rich fertile valley, surrounded by rolling hills, where the vineyards, that produce the best Australian wines are planted. It is the ideal departure point for trips to the Barossa Valley, Australia’s main wine region,which is located about half an hour’s drive away by car. The Barossa Valley is host to a wine festival which sees entire towns abandoned, in order that the residents may take part in the festivities. From Adelaide it is also possible to take a day-long trip to Kangaroo Island. A Kendell Airlines small plane will fly you to the island in approximately 45 minutes, from here you continue on by bus to Seal Bay, where colonies of sea lions live undisturbed. Walking along the beach, escorted by numerous sea-gulls, you will visit the Kelly Hill archaeological site, followed by a tasty barbecue in the Australian bush. After lunch, the trip continues with a visit to Flinders Chase National Park and Rocky River Homestead, where kangaroos, ostriches and koalas roam free. [[[Adelaide - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian Dollar Electric suply: 240/250 volts 60 Hertz. Electric plugs are flat, three-pinned and necessitate the use of an adaptor. Climate : Adelaide is a pleasant city, thanks to its Mediterranean climate, with mild Winters and hot Summers. In the hotter months, from December to February, the city can be enjoyed strolling along the beach or among the open-air cafés. In Spring and Autumn, the days are pleasantly mild. Summer sees a maximum temperature of 29°C,while in Winter this drops to 15°C. Language : English, Aborigine Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday, from 9am to 5:30pm. Saturday from 9am to Noon. The banks are open Monday to Thursday, from 9.30am to 5pm The public offices from Monday to Friday, from 9 am to 5pm [[[Adelaide - A pocket guide]]] It is possible to eat very well in Adelaide, especially in the Hindley Street area, a zone rich in ethnic restaurants(Lebanese, Italian and Greek). For those wishing to savour Adelaide’s night-life, The Tourist Office publishes a calendar of events for the Festival Centre. There are also numerous pubs, where it is possible to listen to jazz and folk music.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Brisbane Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Brisbane - Out and About]]] Brisbane, situated 40 km from the mouth of Moreton Bay, extends from the bay along both sides of the river Brisbane. Initially a penal colony, it was given city status in 1824. The city developed rapidly, particularly from 1859, when it was proclaimed the capital of Queensland. The one million inhabitants of Australia’s third largest city, reside among the hills surrounding the city.. This helps in giving Brisbane an intimate atmosphere. The tranquil city centre is harmonized by Brisbane’s Victorian style. Spring hill, the city’s old residential area, enchants and confuses with its maze of old-style houses. The newer areas of the city follow a more rational urban plan and are more welcoming, with their numerous parks and gardens. Queen Street Mall, in the middle of Brisbane, is the shopping heart of the city. It is full of fashion boutiques, speciality shops and restaurants. South Bank Parklands, situated on the opposite bank, offers excellent dinners with views over the river and is only a few minutes away from the city’s art galleries and museums. Brisbane is a city of open spaces, with numerous botanical gardens, like the new Farm Park: a riverside park rich in trees and rose bushes. Moving away from the river to the in-land areas of the city, there are numerous examples of typical Queensland houses, with corrugated iron roofs and wide verandas ,which reflect the old life-style of sun and relaxation. There are many tropical style buildings raised above the ground, with verandas looking out over the river, or onto a picturesque square Some of the many bridges that span the river, are note-worthy: the beautiful Story Bridge, The William Jolly Bridge, The Victoria Bridge and The Captain Cook Bridge. Brisbane is the site of the University of Queensland, Australia’s second university. It is surrounded by the meandering river, set in spacious parkland with sandstone buildings, cloisters and statues. The National Art Gallery is also located in Brisbane, housed in the Queensland Cultural Centre, a magnificent complex, that extends along both sides of Melbourne Street, in South Brisbane. The city is also host to The Queensland Art Gallery, The State Library, The Performing Arts Complex and The Queensland Museum, which includes both a notable whale section and a section dedicated to Paleonthology and Geology. Many of the city’s historic buildings date back to the last century: The Old Windmill, The Palace of Treasure, The Parliament building, The Mansions, The Old Saint Stephen Gothic church, and The National Bank, an example of Italian Renaissance Architecture in Australia. Brisbane is well serviced by both bus, taxi, train, and boat. Citybus operates a service from the city centre to the suburbs, with frequent stops. For a faster and more direct route, it is advisable to use the Cityexpress buses. If you would prefer to skirt the city, it is possible to catch The Great Circle Line which also runs to Mt Coot-tha Botanical Gardens . The centre of Brisbane, located on a wide curve of the River Brisbane, is well serviced by ferry boats, which link the two banks of the river. These ferries help connect various points around the city, such as: Kangaroo Point, Dockside and South Bank. Queensland Rail operates the railway line, that links Rome Street and Central Station with both the suburbs and tourist destinations, such as South Bank. Numerous taxis operate within Brisbane and are available 24 hours a day. [[[Brisbane - Not to be missed]]] Mt Coot-tha, 8km from the centre, is the best place to gain a panoramic view of the city. On a clear day, it is possible to make out, not only the shape of the distant islands of Moreton and Stradbroke, but also Stradbroke’s mountains to the North and the mountains behind the Gold Coast to the South. Mt Coot-tha offers varied and beautiful walks, one of which leads to to the JC Slaughter Falls. At the foot of the mountain it is possible to visit the vast and interesting Mt Coo-tha Botanical Gardens and the Sir Thomas Brisbane Planetarium, the largest in Australia. The Brisbane Forest Park, is another highly recommended visit. The park is accessible either by car or bus. Visitors, arriving by bus are transported to within a very short distance from The Information Centre. This large natural reserve of 285km, located in the D’Aguilar Range, begins in the outskirts of Brisbane and stretches for over 50km both to the North and East. The numerous well sign-posted trails are excellent for back-packing, hiking, biking and horse- riding.. [[[Brisbane - Walks and tours]]] Newstead House, located in the outskirts of Brisbane, is the oldest Victorian building in this area , and is well worth a visit. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, is one of the most famous Australian parks and is the refuge for an enormous variety of native species, such as the duck-billed platypus, kangaroo and koala. Moreton Bay, with its crystal- blue waters, offers diverse water sports. It is possible to hire a boat and either explore the cliffs, which surround the dozens of islands, or try your hand at marlin fishing. Brisbane’s best beaches are located around Point Lookout, on the North-East point of the island. In order to arrive here, it is necessary to catch the bus, or train, to Cleveland and from here the ferry to the island. Some ferries also offer the possibilty of taking your car. [[[Brisbane - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian Dollar. Electric supply: 240/250 volts 60 Hertz. The electric plugs are flat, three pinned and necessitate the use of an adaptor. Climate : The city is a few degrees South of the Tropic Of Capricorn. The best period to visit is between April and November, when the temperature varies between 20°C and 27°C. It frequently rains during the Summer months, December, January and February. Language : English(official), Aborigine Opening hours : Shops are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30pm. On Saturday from 9am to noon. There is no Friday closing in Brisbane. The banks are open from Monday to Thursday from9.30am to 4pm and on Friday from 9:30am to 5pm. The public offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm. [[[Brisbane - A pocket guide]]] In Brisbane, it is possible to taste delicious food, sample excellent wines, and enjoy the numerous artistic and sporting events. The Brisbane philosophy of dining out on fine food is clearly shown in its vast array of restaurants and cafés. Brisbane has an active night life, with first-rate clubs and pubs.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Canberra Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Canberra - Out and About]]] Canberra is both the state capital and the capital city of Australia. It is set amidst wonderful landscapes, along The Pacific Coast. The city lies on both sides of the river Molonglo and around Lake Burley Griffin, at the foot of the Australian Alps. The site, for the construction of the city of Canberra, was an obvious choice, given the economic, climatic and scenic factors of this location. Canberra is a modern and refined city, whose architecture and public spaces respect the original desire to create an ordered urban area. New satellite- towns, with a residential feel, have been built in the out-lying suburbs. Canberra has little local industry and functions primarily as the official seat of the government and public services. Forget the traffic jams and car fumes and enjoy the wide open spaces that characterise the city centre. However it is advisable to buy a map, as the city is built on and around the hills and lake and forms a rather irregular pattern. This university city possesses a large library and is the site of the Australian Academy of Science. Canberra is principally a political and cultural city and functions as a meeting point for a large number of different cultures. The city hosts numerous museums and art galleries. The National Gallery of Australia has over 70,000 works of art, which include aboriginal paintings and those of the famous contemporary artist S.Nolan. The airport is situated approximately 7km South-East of the city centre. An airport mini-bus service departs from the Jolimont Centre and various hotels. Canberra’s public transport system covers the majority of the city, however it runs on an irregular basis and is practically non-existent after 10pm on Sundays. The roads in Canberra are excellent and the lack of traffic makes driving easy. [[[Canberra - Not to be missed]]] A different view of the city can be obtained from the summit of Black Mountain, which looks out over The Australian National University, the Civic Centre and Lake Burley Griffin; with its Captain Cook Memorial, an impressive water spout, that reaches a height of 40 metres. On the opposite side of the lake, it is possible to make out the large metal globe, which shows the routes taken by Captain Cook , during his voyages of discovery. From the summit of Mount Ainslee it is possible to see The Old and New Parliament and The Australian War Memorial. The War Memorial, with its collection of fighter planes, films and memorabilia of the battles fought by Australia, makes this one of the finest war museums in the world. Capitol Hill is the site of The Mint and The Old and New Parliament. The National Capital Exhibition,1.8 km from the centre, is the ideal departure point for a tourist trip around Canberra. The exhibition, using high-tech multimedia equipment, details the founding of Australia’s capital city and the aboriginal occupation of the country, prior to the arrival of the Europeans. The exhibition also explains Canberra’s vital role as symbol of the federation and as a place belonging to the people of Australia. [[[Canberra - Walks and tours]]] Discover Australia’s national floral inheritance by strolling through The Australian National Botanic Gardens, which is nestled at the foot of the Black Mountain, 2.4 km from the city centre. The gardens possess the world’s best collection of Australian flora. Various ecosystems have been created, where it is possible to admire the plants and flowers from Australia’s mountains, rain forests and deserts. For those wishing to have more precise information, it is possible to follow a guided tour around the gardens. In January, the gardens provide a relaxing way to end your day: the opening times are extended and concerts are organised in the grounds. It is immediately obvious that Canberra is an excellent departure point for outdoor activities. Pleasant trips can be had to the old farming and mining towns of Captains Flat and Bungedone. [[[Canberra - The traveller's notebook ]]] Currency : Australian Dollar Electric supply: 240/250 volts, 60 hertz. Electric plugs are flat, three pinned and necessitate the use of an adaptor. Climate : The best period to visit the city is Spring, when the temperatures are fresh and the views are clear, or in Autumn with its balmy climate. Language : English Opening hours : Shops are open: Monday to Thursday 9am to 5pm; Friday 9am to 9pm; Saturday 8:30am to noon. Banks are open. Monday to Thursday 9.30 am to 4pm; Friday 9.30am to 5pm. Public offices are open: Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>5</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Darwin Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Darwin - Out and About]]] Darwin is the capital city of The Northern Territory and the northern most point of Australia. The city is situated on a peninsula, on the Eastern bank of Darwin Bay. It is the international entry point to South East Asia and a strategic commercial centre. The city, was founded in 1869 under the name of Palmerston. This was changed in1911, when the city was re-named Darwin, after the famous explorer. The city has many noteworthy buildings: The Old Navy Headquarters, built in1884, Fanny Bay Jail built in 1883 and Brown’s Mart, the oldest building in the centre. These buildings, located along The Esplanade, are fortunately still standing, having survived Cyclone Tracy, that struck Darwin in 1975. The Art and Science Museum and East Point are both recommended places to visit .At East Point, it is possible to observe spectacular sunsets in the company of numerous kangaroos. One of the city highlights is The Mindil Beach Casino, situated near the city’s most famous beach at Fannie Bay. Darwin, with its tropical nature, is host to an interesting Botanical Garden, covering 34 acres and offering hundreds of varieties of plants. The Northern Territory Museum of Arts and Science consists of five galleries, featuring wonderful collections of aboriginal art and culture, together with archaeology sections of the Pacific and Oceanic regions. Darwin has rail links to Larrimah and Adelaide. The airport is only 6km from the city and has an efficient shuttle service. A taxi from the airport to the city costs about $US10. The city possesses a relatively efficient bus service, however, it is only fully operational, from Monday to Friday and does not run on Sunday. Private bus companies operate services to the more interesting areas of the city. [[[Darwin - Not to be missed]]] The Indo-Pacific Marine & Australian Pearling Exhibition This aquarium has amongst its attractions, a marvellous selection of living corals, where sea-horses and puffer-fish live together with other exotic creatures, in this special ecosystem. The Pearling Exhibition, located in the same building, details the history of the pearl industry. The Museum & Art Gallery of NT, is host to numerous collections: aboriginal art, sculptures and bark paintings from Arnhem Land, Bathurst and Melville Islands, South East Asian art, Indonesian “Ikat” and Gamelan musical instruments. [[[Darwin - Walks and tours]]] A visit to the moor-land at the north corner of Fannie Bay, is highly recommendable. The best time to visit is the late afternoon, when the kangaroos come out in search of food, a fresh breeze blows and the sun sets in the bay. There is also a salt water lake, where it is possible to swim all-year round. Lichfield National Park can be reached travelling South across Rum Jungle. This park consists of jagged rock formations, tropical rain forests, huge ant-hills and splendid waterfalls. Visit BuleyOs Rock Hole, Florence Falls, Tolmer Gorge and Wangi Falls, followed by a picnic, with time left over, for a refreshing swim or a walk in the rain forest. Last but not least, visit the National Park Territory, where sea water crocodiles and giant barramundi are a few of the species which make up this fine collection of Northern Territory animals, some of which are not to be found anywhere else. Travelling South, it is possible to admire the magnificent Ant Hills and visit the town of Pine Creek. [[[Darwin - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian Dollar Electric supply: 2407/250 volts, 60 hertz. The plugs are flat, three-pinned and necessitate the use of an adaptor. Climate : There are only two seasons in Darwin: The rainy/monsoon season from November to April and the dry season from April to October Language : English Opening hours : The shops are open Monday To Thursday: 9am to 5pm, Friday: 9am to 9pm, Saturday:8.30am to Noon. The banks are open from Monday to Thursday: 9.30am to 4pm, Friday 9.30 to 5pm. The public offices from Monday to Friday: 9am to 5pm [[[Darwin - A pocket guide]]] Darwin, with its modern shopping centre and large hotels, offers a range of possibilities for entertainment and relaxation. It is a cosmopolitan city, which offers an extensive choice of restaurants. Darwin is the best place in Australia to purchase Aboriginal art and crafts; visit the Arnhem Land Aboriginal Art Gallery, at 35 Cavenagh Street.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Melbourne Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Melbourne - Out and About]]] Melbourne is the capital city of the state of Victoria. It is situated on a vast strip of coastal plain and occupies both banks of the river Yara, at the point where the river flows into Port Phillip. The second largest city in Australia, Melbourne, known for its parks and green open spaces, is referred to as the “Garden City”. Melbourne’s art centres and cultural life are the focal point of the city. Its charm is derived from having succeeded in conserving its splendid Victorian style architecture. Melbourne, built to a regular rectangular plan, has large, wide streets. The city has undergone a rapid economic development, which has seen Melbourne expand into a large metropolis. The city and its suburbs have grown up along Melbourne’s principal road and transport links. Golden Mile, the city centre, is defined by Trobe Street in the north , Springs Street in the east and the river Yara to the south; this area houses Melbourne’s commercial and amministration centres and its main hotels and theatres. The city, with its simple rectangular lay-out, is easy to travel around. Fine examples of late 19th Century and early 20th Century architecture can be seen in Collins Street and Bourke Street. Other notable buildings are: the Gothic style ANZ bank, the Rialto building and St Paul’s Cathedral, on the corner of Swanson Street and Flinders Street. Central Square, with its mix of architectural styles, shops and cafés, is the nerve centre of the city. The square is home to numerous institutes of credit, universities and some of Australia’s best museums and theatres. Throughout the city centre it is possible to see a mix of soaring modern constructions, which stand alongside traces of the city’s historic past: Flinders Station, Parliament House and the Victoria Theatre. The city houses a colourful Chinatown, numerous botanical gardens and a zoo. Tullamarine is the city’s main airport. The Met is the name given to Melbourne’s public transport system. The system comprises, bus, tram and train. One ticket (Metcard) is valid for all three means of transport and can be purchased from shops showing the Metcard flag, or from kiosks and automatic ticket-vending machines in the stations. The city is divided into three transport zones. The city centre is divided into three zones and is best seen travelling by tram. The City Circle Tram is a free service that runs in both directions around the city centre. The service operates Monday to Friday from 10am to 3pm and Saturday and Sunday from 10am to 6pm, with regular departures every twenty minutes. The whole journey takes forty minutes and passes many of the principle sights of Melbourne. Rail journeys are very long and are best suited for travel to the city suburbs. Flinders Street Station is the main departure point for this type of travel. The bus network serves those areas not covered by the tram and train service and operates a night –time service during the week-ends. [[[Melbourne - Not to be missed]]] Melbourne’s many museums include: the Natural History of Victoria Museum, which houses an extensive collection of Australian hand-made articles; the Keeping Place Aboriginal Gallery; the experimental Children’s Museum and the Old Melbourne Gaol, a prison built in 1850 and closed in 1929, a period, during which 136 prisoners were sentenced to death. The Women in Prison section of the Gaol is particularly interesting: evening plays are performed, which combine theatrical art with the cruelness of the prison setting. The Nautical Museum, on Polly Woodside contains old Irish sailing boats. Melbourne is the seat of the National Gallery of Victoria, that houses collections of European art from the 15th century through to the 18th Century (Flemish, Dutch, Italian, French and English), modern art (from Impressionist through Post-impressionist to Contemporary) and Australian art. The Performing Arts Museum has collections from some of the world’s major theatres. Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens: thirty-five hectares of gardens with thousands of species of plants, gathered from Australia and the rest of the world. Melbourne Zoo, the oldest in Australia, has a fine African rain forest exibition, complete with gorillas and orang-utan, an interesting butterfly collection and various animal species typical of the Australian continent. Visitors to Melbourne shouldn’t miss a visit to Melbourne Cricket Ground, home to the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame, the Olympic Museum and the Australian Gallery of Sport. [[[Melbourne - Walks and tours]]] Philipp Island, a fascinating landscape of unspoilt nature and old-fashioned villages, is situated 90 minutes drive south-east of the city, at the entrance of Western Port Bay. It houses a natural park and numerous other attractions, including the Penguin Parade, which takes place every evening at dusk, when the smallest penguins in the world emerge from the sea and waddles up the beach towards their nests among the sand dunes. It is also possible to visit the Koala Conservation Centre and the Seal Rocks Sea Life Centre, home to the largest seal colony in Australia. Bellarine Peninsula forms the western side of Port Philipp Bay and is a popular holiday destination for the inhabitants of Melbourne. The seaside town of Queenscliffe boasts some extravagant buildings, reminders of the Gold Rush Era, which today have been restored to the original splendor. Fort Queenscliffe, built during the Crimean War to protect Melbourne from Russia invasion, now houses a Military Museum. Travelling the scenic route from Melbourne to Ballarat, allows the visitor to stop off and to observe and walk among the animals and magnificent Australian vegetation. Sovereign Hill is an open air museum, situated 110 km. from Melbourne. The museum tells the story of life in Ballarat during the Gold Rush Period. The streets in Sovereign Hill swarm with people dressed in period costume, busy in their daily activities, in the town’s shops, hotels and schools. Here in Sovereign Hill it is still possible for the visitor, armed with pan, to try his luck at searching for gold. The museum is open every day from 10 am to 5 pm [[[Melbourne - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian Dollar Electric supply: 240/250 volts, 60 hertz. The plug is flat three-pinned and necessitates the use of an adaptor Language : English Opening hours : Shops are open from Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5:30 pm; Saturday, 9 am to Midday. Banks are open Monday to Thursday, from 9:30 am to 4 pm; Friday, from 9:30 am to 5 pm Public Offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm [[[Melbourne - A pocket guide]]] Melbourne is the country’s culinary capital, where it is possible to find quality food even in the pubs. Melbourne, the commercial capital of Australia, is also an important centre of fashion Collins Street houses famous large retail stores, such as Meyers and Waltons, while Spring Street and Swanston Street are home to the more exclusive boutiques. The main shopping centres are The Block and Royal Arcade. It is possible to find almost everything at the century old Market: Victoria Market is open Tuesday, Saturday morning. The Moomba Festival, held during the month of March, has interesting theatrical productions. There are many good quality theatre restaurants, including Last Laugh Theatre at 64 Smith Street and the Naughty Nineties at 675 Glenferrie Road. The city’s night life rotates around rock- pubs, such as Bombay Rock and the Station Hotel. Jazz enthusiasts should visit La Brasserie, the Victoria Hotel or the Anchor and Hope.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Perth Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Perth - Out and About]]] Perth, the capital city of Western Australia, is situated on the mouth of the River Swan, twenty kilometres from the inland port of Freemantle. Perth was founded in 1829 and was nominated a city in 1856. It grew rapidly, following the arrival of the transcontinental rail link and the discovery of a gold mine at Coolgarde-Kalgoorlie. Perth is a young,dynamic city; surrounded by large splendid beaches, whose shores are lapped by the crystal-clear waters of the Pacific Ocean. The city centre is both tidy and welcoming and Perth’s suburbs are not lacking in wide open spaces. The itinerary of a city tour should include: the historic buildings, the modern and dynamic centre and Kings Park, 400 hectares of botanical gardens, which houses numerous examples of the flora of Western Australia, together with examples of flowers from those areas, whose climate matches that of Perth’s. Fraser Avenue, bordered by rubber plants, is the entrance gate to Kings Park. This magnificent avenue provides the visitor with an insight into what the park has to offer: splendid views of the city and River Swan, impressive monuments and hidden angles of true unspoilt nature, right in the heart of the city. The park is situated on Mount Eliza and its 400 hectares include numerous paths and trails to be explored either on foot or by bike. The West Australian Botanic Garden is also worth a visit. The gardens contain a collection of over 1,700 species of local plants and flowers. Perth’s oldest building is situated in Sterling Gardens. The main shopping areas are located along Murray Street, Hay Street and the pedestrianized London Court, which is a reconstruction of a 16th Century English street. The Western Australian Museum possesses permanent collections of Australian and international paintings and houses the world’s finest collection of Aboriginal art. The museum also regularly hosts important art exhibitions. Free guided tours are organized Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. Travelling around Perth does not present any major problems. The city possesses an efficient road system and its public transport is fast and reliable. The entire public transport system is managed by Transperth and one ticket is valid for travel on buses, trains and ferries. The timetables and tickets are available from the Transperth Infocentres. Buses run from 6am to 11:30 in the evening. The Central Area Transit (CAT) buses are free and run along three different routes in the city and Northbridge. The Transperth trains run from 5:30 in the morning to Midnight during work days. The trains depart from Perth Railway Station and run northwards to Currambine, southwards to Armadale, eastwards to Midland and westwards to Freemantle. The timetable is extended on Friday and Saturday until 2am during the winter and until 3am in the summer. The ferries cross the river from Barrack Street and Mends Street quays and provide a service connecting the city with Souht Perth. The ferries run from 7am until 7:15 pm during work days and until 11:10 on Friday and Saturday. The fares are calculated on an eight-zone system. Pre-paid fastcards can be purchased in advance from newsagents and InfoCentres. Taxis are reasonably priced and can be found at the major hotels, and the train and bus stations, they can however be hailed along the street. Some companies offer a telephone booking service (White taxis- tel: 131 008, Swan Taxis- tel. 131 388) Tips are not necessary but it is general practise to round up the cost of the fare. [[[Perth - Not to be missed]]] His Majesty’s Theatre, splendid in its original state, is one of the oldest theatres in Australia. The building , decorated with golden foyers and marble staircases, has a three-plateau auditorium. The theatre often hosts operas, ballets and musicals and has a permanent display of theatre memorabilia. Perth Mint, a fine reminder of the bygone days of the gold rush, offers an interesting guided tour, where the visitor can help in making gold, silver and platinum coins, together with gold ingots worth A$ 200,000. The recently renovated Aquarium of Western Australia offers spectacular dolphin shows, three times a day. The Aquarium’s 100 metre glass tunnel, the longest in Australia ,takes the visitor into a magical world of fish and marine life. [[[Perth - Walks and tours]]] A bus departs twice a day from Thomson Bay and takes the visitor on a two-hour guided tour of Rottnest Island. The island, with its beautiful scenery, possesses an unfortunately sad past, having been the site of an old Aboriginal prison. The island which in Dutch means “rats nest,” is a stretch of sandy beaches and crystal-clear water. The “rats” are in fact quokkas, small and harmless marsupials; although innocuous, they can be a nuisance during picnics. It is possible to practise a wide range of water-sports on the island and riding one of the easy to rent bikes, is the most popular means of transport. Rottnest is a popular bird-watching zone home to numerous species of birds: cormorant, heron, curlew, swans and various birds of prey. Other trips include a train or ferry ride to Freemantle, or “ Freo” as it is referred to by the locals. This port , now encompassed within the ever increasing limits of Perth city, was the site of the 1987 unsuccessful Australian attempt to clinch the Americas Cup. Yachting is an important past-time of Freemantle and attracts large numbers of boating enthusiasts to its crowded bars. Trains leave every 15 minutes for Freemantle from Perth Station, there is also a shuttle service from the airport and numerous ferry links. Other attractions on offer outside the city include: the vineyards of the Swan River Valley and the Caversham Wildlife Park. Crossing the Darling Rangers, the visitor arrives at the colonial town of York, home of the famous Wave Rock; an imposing granite formation, eroded by the winds of millions of years. In order to visit other impressive rock formations and see ancient aboriginal paintings, the visitor should take a guided tour of the Humps, Hippo’s Yawn Cave, Mulkas Cave and Aboriginal Cave. [[[Perth - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian dollar (AU$) Electric supply: 240/250 volts 60 Hz. The plugs are flat, three-pinned and necessitate the use of an adaptor. Climate : The climate in Perth is mid-way between a Californian climate and that of the Mediterranean. The winter is mild and the summer is hot and dry. Perth is Australia’s sunniest city, and the skies are almost always cloudless and blue. The summer months are hot with an average temperature of 29°C during the day and 17°C during the night. The hot summer days are refreshed late in the afternoon, thanks to the “ Freemantle Doctor”, a strong, fresh breeze that blows from the ocean. The winter months, from June until August, are mild, with an average daily temperature of 18°C and 9°C at night. The wettest month is July, but the temperature rarely drops low enough to provoke snow and frost. Language : English Opening hours : Shops are open from Monday to Friday: 9am until 5:30pm. Saturday from 9am until Midday. The banks are open from Monday to Thursday from 9:30 am to 4pm, Friday from 9:30am to 5pm.The public offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm. [[[ Perth - A pocket guide]]] The typical products of the region include: opals and other gems, aboriginal handicrafts and characteristic ferrous jewellery. The best place for shopping is : Hay Mall, with its 6 shopping galleries; Piccadilly; Wanamba; Trinity; National Mutual; City and Plaza. Perth’s Festival of Art runs from February to March, with film and musical exhibitions. Perth offers its visitors a host of pubs, clubs, discotheques and theatres throughout the year.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Sydney Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Sydney - Out and About]]] Sydney is not only the largest city in Australia (3,500,000 inhabitants) but is also the capital of New South Wales, the oldest state in Australia. The city lies along the length of the peninsula from the southern coast of Botany Bay to Port Jackson. The construction of an enormous bridge, at Port Jackson, has made the communication between the two parts of the city much easier and has allowed the city to expand and incorporate the smaller out-lying areas. Sydney now comprises 531km2 (Greater Sydney), made up of 29 districts and various city areas: Parramatta, Liverpool, Penrith, Bankstown, Canterbury and Sydney itself. Sydney, like any metropolis, is constructed around a densely built-up city centre, however there are many residential areas where trees and plants contend with the buildings for space. These zones of the city give the impression of living in the country-side, with eucalyptus trees growing outside the window and sub-tropical vegetation to complete the picture. The city centre is quickly and easily reachable by car. The sea, with its many beaches and numerous sandy inlets, is only a few minutes away from whatever point in the city. Sydney is best described as a coral-shaped stretch of sea that penetrates inland for kilometres, indenting the land on its way and creating an increasingly wonderful landscape. Frenetic and at the same time romantic, lively and bubbly; Sydney is a collection of attractions, that rarely deludes its visitor. The city offers numerous interesting sights: the Harbour Bridge, The Rocks and Sydney Harbour. The Rocks, built in 1932, is a splendid example of contemporary architecture and is not only the cultural centre of Sydney, but is also the true heart of the city. This area of old colonial- style shops and elegant residences, complete with verandas, possesses numerous attractions for the visitor: Argyle Cut, Cadman’s Cottage, the Geological and Mining Museum and the Hero of Waterloo Hotel;. the Sydney Harbour Bridge marks the finishing point of The Rocks and the start of the splendid bay, that leads the visitor to the Sydney Opera House, emblem of modern art and symbol of the city. A splendid view over the city can be gained from the Sydney Tower, Marquerie’s Point or the terrace of the Visitor’s Centre at the Australian Museum. The city’s note-worthy buildings include: the Mint (1811), Saint James’ Chuch and the Queen’s Square Barracks, all from the Classic period, the Byzantine Synagogue, various Victorian buildings and the modern - style Gloucester House(1932), University Student House and the J. Utzon Opera Theatre(1957-1970). The city is a flourishing cultural centre, seat of three Universities; a polytechnic; a Musical Conservatory; an Academy of Fine Arts; an Astronomy Observatory; a library; an Australian Museum, the largest in the country dedicated to natural history and Aboriginal and Melanesian art and the National Art Gallery, which contains European masterpieces from the Renaissance Period and Australian art from the 19th and 20th Century. The city’s transport system of buses, ferries and trains, is well developed, efficient and cheap. State Transit operates both the bus and ferry service. Bus tickets can be bought directly on board the buses. The commuter ferry network, that crosses Sydney Harbour, is one of the best ways to see the port. The ferries run from Circular Quay to 30 separate destinations. City Rail operates the rail network, with high-speed trains that transport passengers from the outskirts to the city. This service is not always convenient for those tourists who wish to visit the city centre. Sydney Metro operates the monorail and the metropolitan light rail. The monorail serves only the city centre, Darling Harbour and Chinatown; while the metropolitan light rail runs between Central Station and Lilyfield. Taxi ranks are located outside most train and bus stations. The fares are subject to increases for the transportation of luggage,booking by phone,crossing the Sydney Harbour Bridge and certain areas of the Eastern Distributor, where a toll-service is in function. Tips are not necessary, however the fare price is usually rounded- up. The Kingsford Smith International airport is located at the extreme northern point of Botany Bay. [[[Sydney - Not to be missed]]] The Royal Botanic Gardens, with its collection of South Pacific flora, is only one of the many parks within Sydney. The oldest national park in the world is situated 30km south of the city . This sandstone high-plain, covered with a mass of low bushes, was devastated by fire in 1994; fortunately the wooded valleys and the beaches have remained intact. The Hacking River runs through the middle of the park. Audley, situated on the river bank, offers picnic areas and the possibility to hire boats in order to explore the river. The 26km trail which starts from Bundeena is spectacular. The best views of the park are obtained from the Illawarra slopes, near the southern border of the park. A visit to Sydney Bay is a must and is best seen by crossing it on a ferry-boat. Visit the numerous beaches in the city suburbs, all of which are beautiful and suitable for bathing: the closest is Bondi Beach, but equally attractive are Cronulla and Maroubra. [[[Sydney - Walks and tours]]] Beach and surf lovers of New South Wales owe their thanks to Manly Beach, for it was here, in 1902, that the editor William Gocher, defied for the first time the state law, which prohibited public bathing. Manly Beach esplanade is now an area populated by rollerbladers, joggers and cyclists, while the white sands to the south and the golden sands to the north are host to a multitude of bathers and surfers. Manly Beach can be reached by means of a short ferry ride from Circular Quay, or on foot following the Manly Scenic Walkway, which starts from Spit Bridge in the city. The walk can take up to 4 hours, but is rewarding and offers some of the most breath-taking views of the city. A visit to the Blue Mountains is not to be missed. The easiest way to see them is by car, however there is a train service which leaves every hour from Central Station for Katoomba. The dramatic scenery of the Blue Mountains National Park is a great attraction for nature lovers. There are numerous trails which lead through the fresh forest of eucalyptus trees. The trees give off a blue haze, from which the zone takes its name. The more active visitor can dedicate himself to hiking, horse-riding or mountain-biking. The major attraction of the park is the Three Sisters, a characteristic rock formation, that owes its name to aboriginal legend. [[[Sydney - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Australian Dollar Electric supply: 240/250 volts, 60 Hz. The plug is a flat, three-pinned plug and necessitates the use of an adaptor. Climate : The climate is temperate, with an average summer temperature in Februaryof 21.4°C and an average winter temperature in July of 12.6°C. There are however suffocating heat waves in the summer and freezing rainy days in the winter but no snow or ice. Rainfall is heaviest between April and June. Language : English Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5:30 pm On Saturday from 9 am to Midday. Banks are open from Monday to Thursday, from 9:30 am to 4 pm; Friday from 9:30 am to 5 pm Public Offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm [[[Sydney - A pocket guide]]] For those interested in cultural, musical or shopping activities, the city of Sydney does not lack in occasion. The main shopping area is enclosed within the zone delineated by Martin Place, George Street, Park Street and Elizabeth Street. Here it is possible to find the large department stores: Waltons, Grace Bros and David Jones. The city centre is the pedestrianized Martin Place, where free concerts are held during public holidays. Paddy’s, at Darling Harbour, is a bustling market of fresh produce, flowers, clothes and leather goods. It is held every Friday and Saturday. George Street hosts numerous restaurants, sandwich bars and cafés. Thanks to the influx of immigrants, Sydney now boasts a surprising variety of fine restaurants, located throughout the city. It is possible to taste a wide range of fish and meat based cuisine. Sydney has a very active night-life, especially in Leagues Club and in private clubs, such as St. George Leagues Club. The Old Push at 109 George Street and the Basement at Circular Key are highly recommended for the jazz enthusiast.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Salzburg Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Salzburg - Out and About]]] Salzburg is located in the north west of the country, stretches along both banks on the river Salzach and up the slopes of the Kapuzinerberg and Monchsberg hills. The Kapuzinerberg, on the right bank, is home to the old part of the city, while the Monchsberg, on the left bank, is the site of modern Salzburg. Salzburg is the city of Mozart, where he was born and lived until adulthood. The city has built its fame around the notoriety of this great composer, offering attractions including; the houses, where the composer lived, his music, the music festival in August and the international artistic festivals, which manage to produce and regulate a continuous flow of tourists throughout the year. Mozartplatz, with its statue dedicated to the composer, is the focal point and centre of the city. The medieval shopping centre Waagplatz is located to the right of the Glockenspiel cafe and is the departure point for the Judengasse, that leads into the Getreidgasse, forming the heart of Salzburg’s shopping centre. This lively and picturesque zone, with its tall houses, ornately decorated with wrought iron signs, is home to Mozart’s birth place. The house, n° 9, is where the famous composer was born in 1756. It is now a museum and houses Mozart’s first violin, his spinet, musical scores, letters and mementos. The Gstattengasse, beyond the Schleifer Tor, a quaint narrow street, lined with antique shops, is also the departure point for an electric lift, which transports visitors up the Monchsberg hill, site of the Winkler Café and Salzburg’s Casino. The summit of Monchsberg is crowned by the mighty Hohensalzburg fortress, one of the largest existing medieval military constructions and symbol of the city. Built in 1077, the fortress was restored during the 15th century when it became the residence of Achbishops and Princes. Today it is a museum and famous tourist site. Access to the interior of the fortress is permitted only by a guided tour, which details the various stages of the fortress’ architectural development throughout the centuries. A funicular railway transports visitors to the top of the keep tower, where it is possible to obtain a spectacular view of the city and the Bavarian Alps. Another fine view of the city can be obtained from the market square, near the Nonnthaler Bruck, at the foot of the Kapuzinerberg. Here the river Salzach flows under the visitor’s feet and the large mass of the Hohensalsburg Festung, dominates the skyline. The Mirabell Castle stands on the right bank of the river Salzbach. Built in 1666 and modified in1712, the castle was once the summer residence of Archbishops and Princes. The castle’s interior houses a fabulous grand staircase and the Marmorsaal, which hosts classical music concerts. The Baroque Museum, situated to the left of the main entrance, is dedicated to European paintings and sculptures from the 16th and 17th century. St Peter is Salzburg’s oldest church. This Roman Basilica, built between 1130 and 1143, is fronted by a Baroque tower and a gateway with a gable in red marble relief. The right flank of the church, houses the old Peters-Friedhof cemetery, which has at its centre the Magaretenkapelle from the 14th century together with smaller chapels dating back to before this time. Other fine examples of churches within Salsburg are the Franziskankirke, built in Roman style at the beginning of the 13th century, with the choir and tower re- built in Gothic style and the Kollengienkirke, the University Church, which offers one of the finest examples of New Austrian Baroque architecture. The public transport system is well-oeganised, efficient and punctual. Travel cards are available for a three or seven day period and are valid for all public transport. An interesting and characteristic way to view the city could be by one of the many horse-drawn carriages. The funicular railway, at the Fortess in Festungsgasse, is in operation from March to October and departs every ten minutes. The electric lift at Monchsberg in Gstattengasse 13, operates from April to October, from 7am to 1pm. The cable car for Untersberg in St Leonard operates from March to October. [[[Salzburg - Not to be missed]]] The courtyard of the Maria Plain church, provides the visitor with an extensive panorama of the city. The church, which stands on the left bank of the Salzach, to the north of the city, is built in Baroque style and has an imposing façade and a magnificent interior. The Museumplatz is the site of Salzburg’s important museums: the Salzburger Museum Carolina Augusteum, a modern museum dedicated to the history of the city; the Haus der Natur, a large natural history museum, which houses one of the richest acquariums in Europe, together with a live reptile and amphibian zoo; the Barockmuseum, which has displays of sketches, plans and preparatory designs from the Baroque works of Tiepolo, Fragonard, Rubens and Bernini. [[[Salzburg - Walks and tours]]] Mattsee, a beautiful holiday resort with thermal baths, is situated on the Mattsee lake, 20 km north-east of Salzburg. The town also possesses a ancient abbey and a Roman Gothic church from the 13th century. The Hellbrunn Castle is located 5km south of Salzburg. This one-time summer residence of Archbishop- Prince Marcus Sitticus, has magnificent gardens complete with fountains,caves and and a water theatre with 113 moving figures. A road initially leads from the gardens to the Bergwelt Tiergarten, a zoological garden with mountain wildlife and from here the road continues to the top of the hill, site of a folklore museum. Continuing further south, the visitor arrives at Hallein, an ancient and beautiful town, close to the German border. A cable car takes visitors up the Durrnberg hill to the entrance of Salzberg, a salt mine, consisting of a series of communicating tunnels and caves and an underground lake, which can be crossed by boat. Sankt Wolfang Im Salzkammergut, situated 20 km east of the city, is a picturesque resort town. It lies on the lake of the same name at the foot of the Schafberg. The town has many old rustic houses with frescoed fronts and is home to the renown hotel Am Weiseen Rossl, the principle attraction of the town. An old rack-railway takes its passengers on an hour long trip to Schafberg(1783 metres), where it is possible to enjoy one of the most spectacular views in the area, comprising the Austrian and Bavarian Alps and 13 lakes. Travelling further east, the visitor arrives at Bad Ischl, these thermal baths, situated among the Salzkammergut mountains, were once the summer residence of the Austrian Court of the Emperor Francesco Giuseppe. A detour to the south, leads to Hallstatt , an attractive village clinging to the mountainside. From here it is possible to take a cable- car, which climbs to the Dachsteiunhohle Cave, with its magnificent ice formations and the Mammuthhohle, an enormous 40 metre high opening. The second stage of the cable car journey, takes its passengers to the view point, which looks onto the Dachstein Glacier. A longer trip (approx 130 km ) in a southerly direction leads to Heilingenblut, at the start of the famous Grossglocknerstasse, one of Austria’s major tourist attractions. The road, lined by various parking bays , where it is possible to admire this wonderful landscape, leads to Franz-Josefs-Hohe(2369 metres), where an enormous square provides the visitor with fine views of the Pasterze Glacier and the Grossglockner, at 3797 metres ,Austria’s highest mountain. A funicular railway allows visitors to descend onto the glacier. [[[Salzburg - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 volts, with a round two-pinned plug. Climate : continental. Language : German Opening hours : the city operates a flexible opening time programme. Usually the shops are open from Monday to Friday until 7:30 pm and Saturday until 5pm. The banks have a large number of cash point machines [[[Salzburg - A pocket guide]]] Salzburg council has established a youth information centre, at BIVAK at Linzer Gasse N° 72. There is a youth meeting point in Jugendzentrum Lehen at Schumacherstr. 20. The city’s nightlife is centred around Bermudadreieck, which comprises: Steinstrasse, Imbeerstrasse, giselakai and Gstattengasse near the Monchsberg lift</testo> 
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 <titolo>Vienna Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Vienna - Out and About]]] Vienna, Austria’s capital city, has 1,533,000 inhabitants and stands on the right bank of the Danube, at the foot of the Wienervald hills. Originally referred to as Vindobona, the city had already gained notable importance by the period of the Roman Empire. From the 13th century to the end of the First World War, the country was under the rule of the Augsburg family. Nearly all the city’s sights and major attractions are located within a small area and are easily reached on foot. Vienna is divided into districts (Bezirke). District number 1 (Inneren Stadt) is the centre of the city and contains the largest number of monuments, all of which are indicated with a red and white sign. The Ringstrasse is the visitor’s first indication of Imperial Vienna. The Ring Vienna’s most important street, is a wide, tree- lined road, that runs for 6 kilometres forming a ring around the city centre. The Ring, built on the orders of the Emperor Francesco Giuseppe, encloses the Graben, Vienna’s Salon, a long bustling square, with elegant shops and lined by marvellous wonderful buildings. The Hofburg, the imperial palace and, for seven centuries, the Augsburg family home, is located along the Kohlmarkt to the south-west of the Graben. The palace is a vast complex of buildings dating back to different periods of history. The Josefsplatz is located behind the palace’s stable block. This is one of the city’s most elegant squares, lined with 17th century buildings including the National Library, built in 1723 and the Albertina Palace, built on a spur of land,, originally the site of ancient ramparts. The palace was built in 1871 for the Archduke Alberto and houses the Museum of Cinema and the National Library musical collection. The city centre is the site of the Stephansdom, Austria’s finest example of a Gothic church, with pointed steeple and multi-coloured roof. The area comprising Seitenstettstr, from Rabensteig and Fleischmarkt, forms the Jewish district of the city. This area, known as Bermudadreick, houses taverns, restaurants and English bookshops. The Karntnerstrasse, flanked by historic hotels, elegant shops and art galleries is the nerve point of the city. The square is dominated by the majestic San Carlo Borromeo Church, the finest expression of Viennese Baroque architecture. The old suburbs of the city are located between the two ring roads; The Ring and the Gurtel. The Prater, located in the second district, is a green corner of nature, with woods and lawns, which was once the imperial hunting reserve and, which under Joseph II in 1766, was opened to the public. The Prater contains numerous sporting clubs and associations and is also the site of the Wurstelprater, an enormous theme park with rides, attractions and a miniature train which crosses the park. The third district houses the Belvedere Castle, originally the home of Prince Eugene of Savoia. It comprises two buildings, linked by a splendid garden and terrace and houses a collection of Austrian art. The main road running to the south- west of the city is the Mariahilferstrasse, which connects the ring to the Schonbrunn Castle. This building, the finest example of an imperial Austrian palace, Was the summer residence of the Augsburg. Vienna has four metropolitan lines, a bus and tram service,together with an express tram service (Schnelbahn), that connects the centre to the suburbs. Thirty tram lines in total, cross the city. It is advisable to purchase a travel pass (Dreitagekarte), which allows unlimited travel on any public transport. The traditional horse-drawn carriages are a novel way to visit the city, however it is advisable to agree the fare beforehand. There is a barge service, which operates from mid April until the end of September, that connects the city with the towns of Krems, Link and Passau. [[[Vienna - Not to be missed]]] Those wishing to visit a museum, should go to the Kunsthistorisches Museum, housed in a splendid building in the Ring, with one of the largest picture galleries in the world. The paintings include work from Egypt, Greece, Medieval Rome and the Renaissance and Baroque periods. The Natural History Museum has a rich botanical and zoological section and the museum’s didactic approach is greatly appreciated by the visitor. The Academy of Figurative Art, houses notable collections of Dutch painters, paintings from the Italian School including Botticelli, Tiziano and Gentile da Fabriano and a gallery dedicated to the triptychs of Bosch. In addition to the museum’s paintings there is the fine Albertina drawing collection, with works from the Italian, French and English Schools of the 15th and 17th century, 40,000 drawings and almost 1 million lytographies, prints and engravings. [[[Vienna - Walks and tours]]] The interesting village Heiligenstadt is located in the northern outskirts of the city. The village’s central square houses the S. Jakob Roman church and the house of Beethoven, a 16th century rustic construction with a picturesque courtyard, where the composer lived around 1817. Continuing north for a few kilometres, the road arrives at Grinzing, an old wine-producing village, famous for its “Heuriger”, quaint bars, where the newly produced wine is served, accompanied by dancing and singing to the sounds of a traditional Viennese Quartet. A further 3km takes the visitor to the Kahlenberg hills, where at the 483 metre summit, it is possible to obtain a magnificent view over the city of Vienna and the meandering Danube. The Wiener Wald tour (total distance 77km) is a trip of great interest, in a region rich both in natural beauty and historic and artistic monuments. Travelling south, one arrives at Baden, an important hydromineral station. From here travelling north-west, there is the possibility of visiting Mayerling, a chapel that commemorates the site, where in 1889 the Achduke Rodolfo, son of the Emperor Francesco Giuseppe and the only heir to the Austrian throne, took his life, together with the Baroness Maria Vetsera. From here travelling north east it is possible to visit Heiligenkreuz, site of the famous Cistercian abbey founded in 1155.The town of Modling, located a short distance to the east, is the site of the BlackTower (Schwarzer Turm) and the Liechtenstein Castle, both romantic reconstructions of ancient medieval fortresses. [[[Vienna - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 volts, with a round two-pinned plug. Climate : continental with cold winters and warm summers with moderate rainfall. The best time to visit is May- June, September-October. Language : German Opening hours : the city operates a flexible opening time programme. Usually the shops are open from Monday to Friday until 7:30 pm and Saturday until 5pm. The banks have a large number of cash point machines. Telephones : to telephone to Austria the country code is 0043 followed by the area code without the initial zero. [[[Vienna - A pocket guide]]] The principle shopping centres are located among the narrow streets around S. Stephen, the Mariahilferstr and the Favoritenstr. The majority of them are now pedestrianized and bustling with all kinds of shops. Sample traditional Viennese food in one of the city’s Beisel. These characteristic places offer good food at reasonable prices. The Beisels are concentrated around Bermudadreieck,in the old part of the city between Seitenstettengasse, Ruprechtskirche and Rabensteig. The Imbibstuben, snack bar and Stehbeisel are always appreciated by the tourist. The locals frequent the Statdheurigen, city taverns, situated in the cellars of the old part of the city. Generally the restaurants serve lunch from 12 to 2pm and dinner from 6pm to 10pm. Many offer a fixed price menu. A mid-day snack can be taken in one of the many kiosks dotted around the city. The Wurstelstande offers hot sausages, sardines and boiled eggs.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Bruges Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Bruges - Out and About]]] Bruges is a fascinating tourist city in Flanders. The city lies along the banks of a number of canals, forming an oval shape inside a medieval wall. Four gates, belonging to this ancient wall, dating back to 1326, are still intact. Bruges has conserved its Gothic and Pre-Renaissance character, which it acquired in the 13th and 14th century, when the city was one of the most important commercial and financial areas in the world. Grand Place forms the centre of the city. This ancient medieval heart of Bruges is the city's historic commercial centre and site of a typical Flemish market square. Markt is a large open square, practicable only in horse-drawn carriage or on foot. The square is lined by artistic medieval buildings including the Belfort, symbol of the city and site of famous carillon concerts. The beautiful Burg square is located nearby and is linked to Markt via a narrow lane lined with shops selling lace. Burg is the site of the Stadhuis, the Gothic Town Hall, the oldest in Belgium and the Heiligbloed Basiliek, which stands at the south-west corner of the square and which takes its name from the reliquary of the blood of Christ. From Burg, passing through the interesting Blinde Ezelstraat( Blind Mule Street)Gallery, the visitor arrives at the 1821 Vismarkt ( fish market). The Steenhouwersdijk ( Sailor's Way), leads to Groenerei, one of the most famous corners of the city. Huidenvettersplein, located immediately west of Vismarkt, is a fascinating small square surrounded by popular restaurants. This area is the start of Dijver, home to the city's most important museums including the Groeninge, the Arenthuis and the Gruuthuse. The Onze Lieve Vrouwekerk, which houses Michelangelo's Madonna with Child, is located nearby.On the opposite side to this church, in Maraistraat, there is the prestigious Memling Museum, which houses six masterpieces from the German painter Brugge. From the museum it is possible to follow the Sint Katelijnestraat and the Wijngaardplaats, until finally arriving in Begijnhof . This square is linked by means of a hump-backed bridge to the 17th century gatehouse of the monastery. The monastery, one of the oldest in Flanders, a true cornerstone of worship within the city, comprises forty white-walled houses situated around a garden. A group of Benedictine monks still work and pray even today in this oasis of peace and tranquillity. Minnewater, the lake of love, is located south of the monastery Bruges possesses numerous civil and religious buildings of great interest, which have managed to maintain their magnificence, bestowed upon them six hundred years ago. The canals which flow through the city give it a fascinating air, the same air that is derived from walking along the city's cobbled streets. Every angle is different and rich with unusual sights. The city's splendid past is still present in the rich Gothic-Brabantine architecture, the numerous Medieval buildings, the monuments, churches and the various residences of the Duke of Burgundy and the Palace of the Gentlemen of Gruuthuse, which today is a museum, which displays the symbols of the old upper class. It is possible to visit Bruges using whichever public transport best suits the occasion: bus, bicycle, boat or horse-drawn carriage. A small bus network covers the city and the surrounding area. The buses depart from the railway station 1.5km from Markt in a southerly direction and call at Woolestraat and Kuiperstraat. The service operates from 6am to 11pm. Bicycles are however, probably the best means of transport to travel around Bruges. One of the best ways to appreciate the appeal of Bruges is to take a canal trip on one of the boats, which leave every ten minutes from the quay, south of Bruges. The service operates from March to November, from 10am to 6pm every day. Markt is the site for those wishing to take a 35 minute carriage tour of the city. There is also a horse-drawn tram (Peerdentram) which departs from 't Zand every day at 10am and tours the city. The tour lasts around 45 minutes. For those arriving by car, it is advisable to leave the car in one of the car parks at 't Zand or 't Pandreitje. [[[Bruges - Not to be missed]]] The Groeninge museum is specialised in the early works of the great Flemish masters from Hieronymus Bosch to Van Eyck. The 15th century Stadhuis collects rare paintings and furniture. Those wishing to immerse themselves in the city's glorious 14th and 15th century past, should visit the northern and eastern districts and the Sint Jacobstraat, where it is possible to stroll among the historic buildings linking Markt to the Saint James Gothic church. The area boasts the Palace of the Duke of Burgundy, the lodges of the Genovese, Florentine and Venetian merchants, the rich upper class residences, the Bladelin Palace and the ancient port with its customs house. Departing from Woensdagmarkt, along Genthof in a north easterly direction towards the canal , the traveller enters the St Anna district. A quiet and unexplored area with a number of interesting museums and remarkable places to visit including St Jannshuismolen a 17th century Convent for English ladies. Other interesting places to visit in this zone include the Guido Gezellemuseum, the Kantcentrum and the Jerusalemkerk which stands in a street traditionally inhabited by lace makers. [[[Bruges - Walks and tours]]] At only 7km from Bruges, it is possible to visit Damme. This marvellous village has wonderful monuments including the 1464 Stadhuis, which houses a museum dedicated to the art and literature of the anti-Spanish hero Tijl Uilenspiegel. The Zeevaar Museum is also worth a visit. The museum houses models of boats, furniture and pottery. One of the finest seaside villages in Flanders is Lissewge, situated 11km north of Bruges, with its characteristic white houses with green shutters. Following the coast for a further 20km along the 371 road, brings the visitor to the seaside town of Blanknberge, a lively summer location, with festivals, flower competitions and celebrations held around the port. [[[Bruges - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volts, 50 Hertz. Two pinplugs are used Climate : mild sea climate, subject to winds from the west and south-west in winter and summer. The average winter temperature is 8°C during the day and 5°C at night. July and August are the warmest months, but can also be rainy. May and September are the best months to visit. Opening hours : Post offices are open from 9am to 5pm on weekdays and from 9:30am to 12:30pm on Saturdays. Shops are open from 9:30am to 12.30 pm and from 2pm to 6pm, from Monday to Saturday. Banks are open from 9am to 12 pm and from 2pm to 4pm on weekdays and Saturday mornings Telephones : to telephone Belgium from Italy, dial 0032, followed by the area code without the initial zero and the private number. To telephone Italy from Belgium, dial 0039, followed by the area code including the initial zero and the private number. [[[Bruges - A pocket guide]]] The year 2002 is a particularly important year for Bruges, as it has been nominated the European Capital of Culture. The Classic Music Festival is held in Bruges during early February. Mid March is the period of the New Cinema Film Festival, with films from Asia and South America. During Ascension in mid May, Bruges celebrates the Heilig-Bloedprocessie, a festival that honours the drops of blood of Christ, conserved in the city's Basilica. The Cactusfestival of ethnic music, takes place in Minnewater, the second week-end in July. Every five years, during August, the city holds the Gold Tree Parade, which celebrates the wedding between Charles the Bald and Margaret of York, which took place in 1468. The more interesting shops,craftsmen's workshops and ancient beer houses, are to be found in the Medieval suburbs of the city.In the zones of 't Zand, Eiermarkt and Kemelstraat, it is possible to find numerous pubs and bars. The monthly publication Exit Light, available from the tourist office, details what's on and what the city has to offer.The Christmas market, held every year in the squares of Simon Stevinplein and Markt , is well worth a visit. The market offers the best of the local handicrafts. Steenstraat is the main shopping centre in Bruges. Lively market stalls can be browsed every Saturday in 't Zand</testo> 
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 <titolo>Brussels Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Brussels - Out and About]]] Brussels, the capital of Flanders, stands on the banks of the river Senne and the navigable canals of Willebroek and Charleroi, which connect to the Maas and Schelde basins. The city, which dates back to the 9th century, is a flat city, built on a plain on the left bank of the river Senne. The city, constructed around a historic Flemish centre stretches from Manneken Pis to the botanical gardens, crossing the Gand-Place and the Royal district, which runs from Park Mountain to the Palace of Justice, the highest part of the city, with a typical French flavour and continues on, with the last branches of the city, finishing in the Brabant hills. Both the centre and the reas around the city are is easily reached on foot. The ring road, traces the steps of the ancient city walls and marks the city centre limits. The Grand-Place is the gem of both the lower part of the city and of Brussels itself. The Gothic buildings Maison du Roi, look out over the square. These elegant Brabantine Gothic buildings, were erected as a bread market and today are the site of the Council Museum- Museum van de Stad Brussel, the Ville- Stadhuis Town Hall, and the council building, with its splendid 96 metre belfry, and the Guildhall buildings. The Truerenberg leads to the Ministers district. The district, built around a central park,is closed at its northern end by the Parliament building( the Nation Building), site of the Parliament of Flanders. The Royal Palace, with its splendid rooms, stands opposite the Parliament Building. The first covered shopping area in Europe , the Saint Hubert Gallery, built in 1846, stands on the north-east side of the Grand-Place.Walking through the gallery, the visitor is met by shops, restaurants, cafés and theatres. Marolles is the working class disrtrict of Brussels. It is centred around the Place du Jeu de Balle, with narrow lanes and lively squares that host second-hand and antique markets. The Marolles district is dominated by the Palace of Justice, which dates back to 1866 and which possesses a gold column façade. The numerous rooms inside, are centred around the building's 97 metre-high dome. The city is divided into 19 districts, some of which are in turn separated into Communes, areas, where the population is made up entirely of North Africans or Turks, such as St. Josse and Schaerbeek or Etterbeek, the area around the Eurpoean institutions, where the population speak only English. Residents in the Ixelles district, the area where the African district borders the elegant middle-class suburbs,communicate using a mix of various African languages and Swedish. The city hosts various international organizations including the EU, Euratom and Nato.The Atomium construction, built in 1958, for the universal exhibition, can be admired in the Boulevard du Centenaire. The construction, comprising nine steel and aluminium spheres, joined by stainless steel tubes, represents a molecule of iron. The complex houses conference rooms, restaurants, bars and Euratom, where temporary scientific exhibitions are held. Brussels is a relatively small city and is easy to travel around. The three main stations in the city are Gare du nord, Gare Centrale and the Gare du Midi. The public transport system comprises two metropolitan lines, buses and trams. The line, which connects the Gare du Nord to the Gare du midi, is an underground tram line with two different routes. One route connects the two stations directly, the other takes a different route around the whole city. Tickets are valid for one hour and permit the traveller to use all the various means of public transport. An alternative is to buy a book of 10 tickets. The day ticket is also valid for the number 12 bus, which runs to the airport. [[[Brussels - Not to be missed]]] The city, a lively artistic and cultural centre, is home to libraries and museums including the Musee Royal des Beaux- Arts; the Musee Royal d'Art et d'Histoire, which houses classic archaeological exhibitions, works of art from non-European civilizations, Belgium archaeology and displays of decorative and applied art; the Military Museum which contains 450, 000 volumes and records; Autoworld, the largest vintage car museum in the world; the Musee d'Art Ancien Museum voor Schone Kunsten, which. with its 81 rooms, is one of the most important in the world for the conservation of primitive Flemish art and Dutch Baroque art. The Museum of Ancient Art and the Museum of Modern Art are connected by an underground tunnel. Those wishing to admire Art Nouveaux, should visit Maison Van Eetvelde, 2-4-6-Avenue Palmerston, Mauson Van Dijk, 85-87 Bd. Clovis, Solvay house, Horta House and Stoclet building, which possesses Klimt frescoes. [[[Brussels - Walks and tours]]] The 26 km tour of the Soignes Forest. the forest is situated south east of the city, along the road, that passes the Boitsfort hippodrome, south of Bois de la Cambre. The tour comprises the suburbs of Brussels and Boitsfort-Bosvoorde, taking the visitor into the vast state-owned forest, Soignes-Zonienwoud. Passing under the main road in the middle of the forest, the visitor finds himself once again at Groennendaal.Following the main road, which leads from the forest, it is possible to visit La Hulpe, a small town surrounded by lagoons. Rixenstart, is located 26 km away and is the site of Princes of Merode castle, built in the 1631. the tour finishes at the northern part of the forest, along the chaussee de Wavre, at Jazus Eik, site of a 16th century church. travelling further south along the A5, the visitor arrives at Waterloo, which owes its fame to the fact that is is the site of the defeat of Napoleon in 1815. Visitors are shown the battlefield and the museum houses a reconstruction of the battle in miniature form. [[[Brussels - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 volts Climate : the climate is that of temperate maritime, with mild winters and warm but windy summers Opening hours : shops are open from 10am to 6 or 7 pm, Monday to Saturday. Banks and post offices are open from 10am to 4/5pm. the larger shops close at 8/9pm on Friday, while in certain areas shops are open also in the evenings and on Sundays [[[Brussels - A pocket guide]]] The Manhatten Centre, is located near the Gare du Nord. This commercial district is a complex of modern skyscrapers, where it is possible to find whatever you are looking, from gifts to electronic articles, from supermarkets to cinemas. Shops of all kinds are dotted throughout the city, the main shopping streets are: Waterloo Boulevard, the Toison d'Or gallery, the Rue de Namur and the Avenue and the Gallery Louise. There are many colourful markets including the flower market at Gand Place, the antique and book market in Sablon and the flea market in Place du Jeu de Balle. The city's cinemas discotheques and cafés are located between Porte Louise, Porte de Namur, the Sablon and the streets in the lower part of the city, which intersect between Place de Brouckere and the Stock Exchange.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Rio de Janeiro Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Rio de Janeiro - Out and About]]] Rio de Janeiro, capital city of the state of the same name, is situated at Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, forming an amphitheatre around the Bay of guanabrara on the Atlantic Ocean. Amerigo Vespucci arrived here for the first time on 1st January 1502, leading a Portugeses expedition who, mistaking the bay for the mouth of a river, gave the area the name ' January River'. 'Carioca', was the name given to the Europeans, by the local Indios, a nick-name, that even today is still used by the inhabitants of Rio. It's impossible to accurately calculate the number of residents, those officially counted during the census in 2000, were 5,580,544, but the inhabitants of the Favelas, who may amount to the same number , constantly refuse to take part in any form of census. Rio is one of the major economical and cultural centres of the South American Continent, an immense city, chaotic and contradictory, which symbolises and perfectly synthesizes the situation of the entire nation, both from the historical point of view and the a social point of view; Rio a city with a thousand faces. Today the traces of Rio's historical past have all but disappeared under a blanket of urban growth, comprising a jungle of skyscrapers and enormous buildings. This image of a rich and well-to-do city co-habits with the extreme poverty of the Favelas areas. In Rio, well dressed citizens mingle with a multitude of begging children trying to make a living and elegant public buildings stand alongside squalid shacks. Considered one of the most fascinating cities in the world for its geographical position between sea, tropical forest and mountain ranges, Rio is one of the prestigious sites for international tourism. The centre, is located in the northern part of the city, around the two important principal streets Avenida Presidente Vargas and Avenida Rio Branco. Here the historic Rio has in part survived and can be seen in the important religious buildings in Morro de Sao Bento. The Benedictine Baroque Monastery, boasts a 17th century façade and a beautiful interior with an altar and balustrade in jacaranda wood. Other interesting buildings include: the Igreja de Nossa Senhora da Candelaria; the Igreja de Nossa Senhora do Carmo; the ancient city cathedral and the Royal Chapel, where the Brasilian Emperor Pedro I and II were crowned. The oldest religious building in Rio, the 17th century Convent of Sant Antonio, is situated in Largo Carioca and has the Igreja da Ordem de Sao Francisco de Penitencia standing beside it, a splendid example of late Baroque. The imposing Nova Catedral ( Catedral Metropolitana ) , situated a short distance away, was erected between 1964 and 1976 and stands as an architectural contradiction which characterizes the city. some of te profane architectural buildings in rio are worthy of note, including the Paco Imperial, the Municipal Theatre, inaugurated in 1909, the National Library and the Carioca Aqueduct or as it is otherwise called Arcos da Lapa e Santa Tereza, a magnificent structure of 42 arches, built on two levels, which once served to supply water to the city's fountains and which today supports the tram line, which links the centre to the Santa Teresa district. This colurful district with its windy roads is home to numerous bars, restaurants and night clubs. Considered the cultural capital of Brasil, Rio is the site of over 50 museums , some of which have great importance. In particular, the Museu Nacional de belas Artes, in Avenida Rio Branco, which possesses an important collection of international and Brazilian art. The Museu de Arte Sacra displays Brazilian art on a religious theme. The Museu Nacional, situated in Quinta da Boa Vista, houses a vast collection of anthropological and natural science objects. Rio is particularly famous for its 90km of white sandy beaches, the most important of which are, Ipanema and Copacabana, both of which are located in the northern part of the city. In reality the beaches are far less attractive than one imagines: enormous buildings and hotels encumber both beches, not to mention the high level of pollution of both the water and beach. They are however fantastic, lively meeting places, characterised by varied and multi-coloured crowds. The most popular public transport system in the city, is without doubt, but it is also the most difficult to use for the visitor. The buses connect all the zones of the city and during rush hour look like tins of sardines. Personal security is also an element to take into consideration, seeing as bag- snatchers use the confusion and crowds to their advantage. It is advisable not to wear objects of value when travelling around the city. The best way to travel around rio is by taxi. Finding one is relatively simple, they are literally everywhere and are easily recognisable by their yellow colour and blue stripe, which runs along the side of the taxi. The cost of the fare is calculated by a meter, but there is an initial tariff of 2 real. During the night and weekends, the taxi's apply an increased charge. Tips are not necessary. The Metropolitan is also a safe method of transport in rio, comfortable and reliable, but it is still relatively small and covers only short distances: the centre, Copacabana, Flamengo and Botafogo. [[[Rio de Janeiro - Not to be missed]]] The famous Pao d'Acucar, Sugar Loaf, the natural symbol of Rio, can be reached by bus from the centre, Copacabana or Flamengo. However the cable-car is certainly the means of ttransport which offers the best views. The ride is split into two separate parts: the first from the Praia vermelha station to Morro da Urca, the second from here to the summit. One of the most famous sites in Rio is certainly the Corcovado with its statue of Christ. The statue weighs 1145 tons, an stands over the city at a height of 709 metres. The base of the statue houses a chapel which can accommodate around 150 people. From the summit, it is possible to admire a spectacular view over the city, the sea and the surrounding mountains.in addition to the bus, the summit can be reached by means of a small rack railway. ( the Bondinho), which runs every half hour, climbing through the Parque nacional da Tijuca. The park stretches over 3,300 hectares and is the largest urban park in the world.The Jardim Botanico, situated a short distance away from the park, is a paradise of plants and trees, gathered from the four corners of the globe. Founded in 1808, the gardens cover an area of 140 hectares and boast more than 4,000 species of plants. The park is open every day from 9am to 5pm. [[[Rio de Janeiro - Walks and tours]]] The mountainous zone of Serra Fluminense, located 50km from Rio, is an area rich in dense woods, with numerous rivers and streams and a fresh climate. The main area of the zone is Petropolis, situated at an altitude of 810 metres and once the summer residence of the imperial court. The town, founded in 1829, still maintains in part the orderly and rigorous aspect of that time. The town boasts the Princess Isabel Palace and the Imperial Palace, both built in Neoclassic style and today, home to a museum of jewellery, porcelain and furniture once belonging to the crown. Other important buildings include the Neogothic cathedral and the Palacio Cristal, built in iron and glass imported from France in 1881. The coast that runs from Rio to Santos is referred to as ' The Green Coast ', an area of intense blue sea with more than 300 islands, covered with lush green vegetation. The main centre is Angro dos Reis, the departure point for those wishing to reach the islands located in the Bay of Sepetiba. Situated off-shore, in front of this town , is the largest island along the Green Coast, Ilha Grande. Parati, a small colonial town is situated a little further along the coast. the town has maintained its original aspect of three centuries ago and has been declared patrimony of humanity site by Unesco. The town's cobbled streets are practicable only by bicycle, horse or on foot and are surrounded by magnificent old buildings, which house art galleries, restaurants and shops. Parati is full of churches, which reflect its rich 18th century past. The three main churches were in the past used for racial segregation. Nossa Senhora dos Remedios was the church for the white elite, while the Igrja do Roserio, the smallest church, was attended by the slaves and the Igreja de Santa by the freed slaves. [[[Rio de Janeiro - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Real (BRL) Electric suply: 110/120 volt. In some hotels 220 volts. An adaptor may be necessary. Climate : Rio de Janeiro is a tropical city. The summer runs from December to March with temperatures varying from '25°C to 42°C. Winter is from June to August with temperatures that can drop to 20°C during the day and 16°C during the night. Language : Portugese Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 6pm. Saturday from 9am to mid-day. Banks are open Monday to Friday from 10 to 4:30 pm Telephones : To telephone Brasil dial 0055 followed by the area code and the private number. The code for Rio is 21. [[[Rio de Janeiro - A pocket guide]]] Perhaps the main attraction of Rio is its vast choice of night life. The Carioca are a lively and happy population and manage to find a different way to enjoy themselves every evening of the week. It's possible to start with an evening meal in a restaurant followed by a cinema or theatre trip, or a drink in a bar or café, finishing off with a night club, discotheque or samba dance club.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Montreal Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Montreal - Out and About]]] Montreal, Canada's second largest city stands on a 50km long and 17km wide island between two forks of the St Lawrence river. The city's tall skyscrapers, typical of American cities, rise above churches and monuments built according to the most varied of European styles, which bear witness to Montreal's role as a large cultural crossroads. Montreal is the second largest French speaking city after Paris. 70% of its residents are of French extraction, 50% of English origin and the remainder represents all the main ethnic groups on the planet. The Vieux Montreal is the historic centre of the city, dating back to 1624 when it was founded by French colonialists. A tour of the city could begin from Victoria Square and Rue Saint Jaques, the 18th Century financial district. The Notre Dame Basilica, built in 1829, is the most important ecclesiastical architecture in the city. The church is located in La Place d'Armes, near to Victoria Square. Place Jaques-Cartier is the site of the Hotel de Ville, the City Council, re-built in 1924. The Chateau Ramezay, in Rue Notre Dame, dates back to 1705 and houses the Ethnographic Museum. Returning via Rue Saint Paul it is possible to observe and admire the Neo-Classic facade of the Marché Bonsecur and the 17th Century Chapel of Notre- Dame- of-Bonsecur. Dorchester Square and Place du Canada are natural oasis in the centre of Montreal. The Sun Life Building, which housed the English Crown jewels during the last war, is located in this area. It is also the site of the Maria-Reine-du-monde, catholic cathedral, built as a model of the Saint Peter Basilica in Rome. The cathedral, a quarter of the size of Saint Peter, was finished in 1894 and contains a copy of the Bernini canopy. The Place Ville-Marie, site of the Banque Royale Towers, and the McGill College Avenue with the Place Montreal Place, are located a short distance from the Cathedral. The area also houses the Christ Church Cathedral, built in Neo-Gothic style in 1860 and the interesting Contemporary Art Museum. The McGill College Avenue leads into the McGill University Campus, founded in 1821, the oldest university in Canada. The university stands on land left to the country by the leather merchant James McGill. One of the buildings in the complex houses the interesting and varied, Redpath Museum of Natural History. The McCord Museum dedicated to Canadian History is situated in Rue Sherbrooke West close to the site of the McGill University.To the north-west of Rue Sherbrook West, the city starts to climb the Mont Royal Hill, site of the Mont Royal Park, an area with over 100 hectares of woods and meadows . The terrace of the Belvedere du chalet offers spectacular views over the city centre. The Oratoire St-Joseph,a vast reinforced concrete building,stands on the summit of the hill and serves as a pilgrimage site. It is possible to tour the city on foot, using public transport for those destinations further a-field. Montreal has an extensive bus service and 4 underground lines which serve 65 stations, 10 of which are linked to 'Underground City' a system of tunnels and underground passageways, home to 1,600 shops, restaurants, hotels and cinemas. Bus and train services operate from 6am to 1am [[[Montreal - Not to be missed]]] The Musee des Beaux Arts, the oldest and largest collection of art in Quebec, is housed in two buildings linked by an underground passageway. The buildings are located one in front of the other in Rue Sherbrooke West 1379-1380. The north building, characterized by large marble pillars, is the Benaiah Desmarais Pavilion. Its galleries house European art from Medieval to the 20th century and boasts masterpieces by Mantegna, El Greco, Ribera, Poussin, Salvator Rosa, Rembrandt, Renoir, Pisarro, and Picasso. The Benaiah Gibb Pavilion, houses collections of Canadian and Inuit art and is the site of numerous temporary art exhibitions. The galleries are open Tuesday to Friday from 11am to 6pm and from 11am to 9pm on Saturday. The Montreal Olympic Park, designed for the 1976 Olympics, houses numerous interesting modern buildings including the Montreal tower, the world's highest sloping tower. the tower stands at 175 metres and has a cable-car which takes visitors to the observatory, where it is possible to enjoy wonderful views over the city. The Biodrome ( ex-cycle stadium in the shape of a cyclists helmet), houses different natural climates from different zones around the globe. The 73-hectare Jardin Botanique, one of the largest botanical gardens in the world and the second most important after Kew Gardens in London, is situated close to the Olympic Park. [[[Montreal - Walks and tours]]] Quebec city, capital of the province of the same name, is situated 270 km from Montreal. The city was one of the first European settlements on the American continent and even today still preserves the historic fort of Vieux Quebec, recognised in 1985 as a Unesco world heritage site. Vieux Quebec is divided into two main areas. Haut Ville, with its historic centre surrounded by a wall and the Citadel and Basse- Ville, the site of the original 1605 settlement. The main monument in Haute-Ville is the impressive Chateau Frontenac, dating back to 1893, now an enormous hotel complex and symbol of the city. Other interesting buildings include the Monasteres des Ursulines, Holy Trinity, Hotel-de-Ville( Town Hall), Notre-Dame-de-Quebec. The Citadel, located on the southern side of the Haute-Ville was the spectacular defence system built during the British Era and is characterized by thick walls separated by a moat. The Basse-Ville area is a dense assortment of recently restored period buildings, located around Place-Royale. The re-constructed Notre-Dame-des -Victoires, stands out among the buildings surrounding the square [[[Montreal - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Canadian dollar Electric supply: 110 volts Climate : the climate in Montreal varies according to the seasons. The summers are warm and wet with an average temperature that reaches 26°C. Winters are cold with abundant snowfalls Language : English and French Opening hours : Shops are open all day from Monday to Saturday from 9:30am to 6pm and from 12 to 5pm on Sundays. Banks are open from Monday to Thursday from 10am to 5pm and from 10am to 6pm on Friday. Many of the major banks are also open on Saturday mornings. Telephones : To dial to Canada dial 001 followed by the area code and the private number. The code for Montreal is 514. [[[Montreal - A pocket guide]]] Rue Crescent and Rue St-Denis are lively and busy areas in the evening, where it is possible to find bars, bistros and jazz clubs. Old Montreal is the site of numerous jazz-bars and 'boites à chansons', lively but intimate clubs which offer live music. The most popular area is Boulevard St-Laurent, with a multitude of alternative bars and clubs, popular with the young . Montreal has over 4,000 restaurants offering an array of national and international cuisine.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Toronto Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Toronto - Out and About]]] Toronto is the English-speaking cultural and economic centre of Canada. It is the largest city in Canada and stands on the north shore of Lake Ontario. The attractive and vibrant heart of the city is enclosed within a number of satellite towns and industrial estates, which go to make up the area known as ' Greater Toronto', a zone which covers not less than 250 km2. Considered the most American of the Canadian cities, Toronto is however a safe and clean city to visit. Toronto is home to such a diverse number of cultures that in 1989, it was declared by ONU, 'the most ethnically diverse city in the world'. Downtown Toronto is cut in two by the long Yonge Street. The city's true centre is the area along Yonge Street, between the two side streets, Spadina Ave and Jarvis St and the intersections with Front Street and Bloor Street. A visit to this area can start from the CN Tower, the highest single tower in the world and the world's third tallest building. The tower has various platforms, one of which has a rotating restaurant, which completes a full rotation of 360° in 72 minutes and from where it is posible to gaze 160 km into the distance. The Sky Dome, situated nearby, is also a spectacular building. This stadium, which can hold 65,000 spectators, has a fully retractable roof. Harbourfront, at the lake shore, has abandoned its old usage to become a recreational area. The area has three boarding stations, Pier 4, York Quay and Queen's Quay, and has been transformed into an area comprising theatres, restaurants, bars, shops and craftsmen workshops. Financial District around Union station, is rich in modern buildings and tall skyscrapers including the interesting Royal York Hotel, the Royal Bank Plaza ( two towers with 26 and 41 floors), the BCE Place (54 and 44 floors) and the Bank of Montreal, built in Neo-Rococo style. Bay Street is the site of Commerce Court, Scotia Plaza and the three towers, which make up the Toronto Dominion Centre. The area to the north of the financial district is less built up and is the site of the city's public and cultural institutions, including the modern City Hall, which recently replaced the functions carried out within the Neo-Roman Old City Hall. Eaton Centre, a vast shopping centre that stands on the corner of Yong St and Dundas St, is visited on average by a million shoppers per week. This zone also possesses some interesting historic buildings including Makenzie House and Campbell House. Other interesting areas of the city include Chinatown,the University of Toronto district, which is home to Ontario Parliament, situated in the middle of Queen's Park and Yorkville, a one time hippy district and today full of shops, boutiques and high-quality restaurants. Toronto has a well developed public transport system. The underground has two lines and operates Monday to Saturday from 6am to 1:30 am and from 9am to 1:30pm on Sunday. The tram and bus service operates from 5am to 1.30 am. [[[Toronto - Not to be missed]]] Visits to the the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Royal Ontario Museum are obligatory. The AGO, founded in 1900, houses a fine collection of Canadian art together with a collection of European paintings and sculptures from the 15th to the 18th century, including works from Rembrandt, Rubens, Van Dyck, Poussin, Gainsborough, Renoir and Van Gogh. The museum's ' 20th Century Collection', contains amongst others, works by Picasso, Brancusi, Matisse, Leger, Dix. Mirò and Magritte, not to mention a section dedicated to the sculptures of Henry Moore. The ROM, founded in 1912, has an eclectic collection, which includes fine arts, craft work, natural science and archaeology. The dinosaur and Imperial China exhibitions are particularly impressive. [[[Toronto - Walks and tours]]] Niagara Falls are situated a two-hours drive away from Toronto. The falls have always attracted visitors and are are one of the most popular tourist attractions in North America. The waterfall comprises two sections, the Horseshoe Falls and the American Falls. The Horseshoe Falls, in Canadian territory, are 52 metres high and 675 metres wide, while the American Falls are 34 metres high and 320 metres wide. Table Rock observation point is the closest view-point to the falls, however fine views can also be had from the Skylon Tower and the Minolta Tower. In addition it is possible to approach the base of the falls on board the Maid of the Mist, sightseeing boat. [[[Toronto - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Canadian dollar Electric supply: 110 volts Climate : the climate in Toronto is among the mildest in all Canada. The summers are warm and wet with temperatures varying from between 15°C and 25°C. In winter the temperature rarely rises above freezing and there is abundant snowfall. The average rainfall per year is 760mms Language : English and French Opening hours : Shops are open from Monday to Wednesday from 10am to 6pm, on Thursday and Friday from 10am to 9 pm and on Saturday and Sunday from 10am and 5pm. Many chemists and grocery stores are open 24 hours a day. Banks are open from Monday to Thursday from 10am to 5pm and from 10am to 6pm on Friday. Many of the major banks are also open on Saturday mornings. Telephones : To dial to Canada dial 001 followed by the area code and the private number. Toronto has two codes 416 and 647. [[[Toronto - A pocket guide]]] Toronto night-life is an aspect of the city which has only recently started to develop. However this development has been both rapid and efficient and the city is now able to satisfy even the most demanding needs of its visitors. The busiest area is the area in central Toronto around the Theatre District in King St and Queen St, while Little Italy and Greektown offer a wide choice of places with a typical Mediterranean atmosphere. The enormous cultural variety of Toronto's residents is reflected in the wide choice of ethnic restaurants. Visitors must try the steak houses offering typical Canadian cuisine.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Vancouver Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Vancouver - Out and About]]] Vancouver looks out over the Pacific Ocean half way between San Francisco and Alaska. The city lies on a strip of land, flanked in the north by Burrard Inlet and in the south by the Fraser River. With its 2 million inhabitants and its 2,500 km2, Vancouver is the third largest city in Canada and the largest in British Columbia. Situated in a beautiful setting between mountains and sea, it is one of the most attractive and photogenic cities in the world. A recently founded city, Vancouver has the feel of a large metropolis with the relaxed atmosphere typical of a small village. Vancouver, the cultural and commercial centre of the West Coast, is also the departure point for exploring the magnificent scenery of the islands and fjords along the Pacific coast. The heart of the city is located on the small peninsula between Burrard Inlet and False Creek. This is the site of both the old districts of Gastown and Chinatown and the Spectacular Canadian Pavilion, built for Expo '86. The complex is now home to a hotel and conference centre. The 18th century Gastown district is a wonderful mix of paved roads and 19th century public offices, restaurants and shops. An interesting Steam Clock , dating back to 1870 is located in Long Water St. The steam makes the clock' s siren sound every 15 minutes. Gastown finishes without any precise indication as it proceeds east towards Chinatown; a district of little interest from a tourist point of view, but nevertheless original. The district is full of highly colourful wooden balconies and shop signs. The visitor should not miss Dr. Sun Yat-sen Classical Chinese Garden, a reconstruction of a Suzhou private garden during the Ming dynasty. One of the city's most well known monuments, Science World is situated south of Gastown, on the banks of False creek. The monument is a a large 47 metre-high dome and houses the Vancouver Science Museum. The enormous BC Place Stadium, the world's largest inflatable dome is situated nearby. Robson St is the main road, which crosses the entire area of Downtown Vancouver and upon meeting Howe Street and Hornby Street, forms Robson Square. The Square is the site of the Vancouver Art Gallery, which houses an important collection of Canadian art and the largest collection of the works of the artist Emily Carr. The Downtown Vancouver Peninsula widens out and finishes at the site of Stanley Park, one of the largest urban parks in the world . The park is almost completely surrounded by ocean and is the site of Vancouver Aquarium. Vancouver's public transport system comprises, bus, tram( trolleys) and city train (Skytrain) services. The skytrain has four underground stops and a monorail service which runs through the suburbs. Fare prices depend on the zones. There is also a ferry service, operated by Aquabus, which links the two banks of False Creek. [[[Vancouver - Not to be missed]]] The largest part of the city of Vancouver stretches to the south of False Creek. The western most part of this vast area looks out over the Straits of Georgia and is the site of the University of British Columbia, the largest university in the province which is also responsible for operating numerous other cultural institutions including the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Founded in 1947, this museum houses a fine collection of indigenous modern, which includes totem poles, jewellery, statues and the work of Bill Reid, a sculpture, originally from Haida ( the original name of the nation now called Queen Charlotte Islands) [[[Vancouver - Walks and tours]]] Vancouver with its mountains and sea offers numerous possibilities the enjoy the great outdoors. Favourite sites for the outdoor enthusiast include Lighthouse Park, Bowen Island, Grouse Mountain and Lynn Canyon Park.A superb view over the city and surrounding area can be had from the top of Grouse Mountain, which during the winter becomes a popular ski resort. Throughout the year there are numerous sporting activities in this area including the local sport of woodcutting with exhibitions of sculptures carved using a chainsaw. The Capilano Suspension bridge is an interesting and unusual tourist attraction. This magnificent footbridge, suspended high above the Capilano river, links the two sides of a narrow, deep gorge. The bridge is 70 metres high and was built in 1889 by the Scottish pioneer George Grant Mckay. [[[Vancouver - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Canadian dollar Electric supply: 110 volts Climate : The Rocky Mountains and the warm currents from the Japan sea, protect Vancouver from the harsh Canadian winters. The city enjoys one of the mildest climates of Canada's main cities. There is however abundant rainfall even in July and August. December and January are the coldest months and the only months in which it is possible to experience heavy snowfalls Language : English and French Opening hours : Shops are open all day from Monday to Saturday from 9:30am to 6pm and from 12 to 5pm on Sundays. Banks are open from Monday to Thursday from 10am to 5pm and from 10am to 6pm on Friday. Many of the major banks are also open on Saturday mornings. Telephones : To dial to Canada dial 001 followed by the area code and the private number. The code for Vancouver is 604. To call Italy dial 00139, followed by the area code and the private number. [[[Vancouver - A pocket guide]]] Vancouver offers a varied choice of night-life. A list of evening entertainment is available in The Georgia Straight newspaper and the Thursday edition of the Vancouver Sun. Gastown, Yaletown and the area around Granville Street are the liveliest areas of the city during the evening. It is worth noting that it is possible to consume alcohol only up to 1am and it is forbidden to drink alcohol under the age of 19. Vancouver has a vast choice of restaurants, both local and foreign, with the local cuisine being based above-all on the local speciality of salmon and oysters</testo> 
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 <titolo>Prague Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Prague - Out and About]]] Prague, situated on the Bohemian Plain, has the river Moldava running through it and is considered one of the most fascinating European Cities. The historic centre of the city, stands on both banks of the river and is divided into 6 parts, which in the past were considered 6 separate towns, becoming unified during the 17th century. The six zones include: Staré Mesto ( the Old Town), Josefov ( the ex- Jewish town, which now forms part of the Old Town), Nové Mesto (New town), Male Strana ( the Small Part), Hradcany and Vysehrad, which houses the largest number of historic monuments,museums and works of art. The castle (Prazsky) is the most visited and famous sight in Prague. The castle, the largest and oldest in the world, is the official residence of the Czech government. It is an immense building comprising gardens, churches and museums.The Gothic San Vito Cathedral, built in 929, rises up above the bulky mass of the castle. The heart of the castle is the Vladislao Room, a fine example of late Gothic. The Summer Palace (Letohradek) is in Renaissance style, while the Saint George Basilica is the best preserved Raman construction. Having passed the Basilica following the north wall of the castle, the visitor arrives at the Golden Alley ( Zlata Ulicka) with its small and highly colourful houses, once the residence of gold merchants and later occupied by artists. The square in front of the castle (Hradcanske Namesti) is surrounded by Baroque and Renaissance buildings, with the Plague Column, situtated in the centre of the square.. The Loretanske Namesti, situated to the west, is the site of the Cappuchin Monastery, the Cernin Palace and the Loreta. A little further and one arrives at the Strahov Monastery, with splendid frescoed rooms, which house a monastic library of international fame. Mala Strana district, perched at the foot of the castle, is decorated with monumental, predominantly residential, buildings. The Nerudova Ulice is one of the most beautiful buildings, having conserved its Renaissance façade. The Saint Nicholas Church, situated in Mala Strana, in Malostranske Namesti, is richly decorated and has an enormous green dome. The square, in which the church is situated, is closed at one end by the river and has the Wallenstein Palace, occupied by the Ministry of Culture, at the other. Stare Mesto, the old city, is located to the east of the Mlodava river and is the site of Starometstske Namesti, the heart of the city. Here the visitor is offered a sample of all the architectural styles of the city including Tyn Church, with its pointed roof covered with small spires, and the Stone Bell-Tower House, with its two chapels used as a modern art gallery and a chamber music room. The Town Hall, built in Gothic style, possesses a splendid astronomic clock. The Klementinum, an enormous architectonic complex, is situated a short distance away. The building houses libraries, museums and churches and leads to the Charles Bridge ( Karluv Most), an area bustling with tourists, painters and souvenir sellers. Josefov, the Jewish district, stretches to the north of the city. Four synagogues from the old district are still standing, together with the Town Hall, a ceremonial room and the old cemetery. The Old-New Synagogue (Staronova Synagoga) is the only one in the world built in Gothic style and is the oldest among those still in function within Europe. Nove Mesto, the New City, dates back to the 14th century and is situated beyond the walls that ring the old city. The Venceslao Square, is the focal point of this centre and site of the National Museum. The Lucerna covered walk way is an elegant Art Nouveau complex comprising theatres, cafés, a cinema and a restaurant. The Gothic style , Saint Mary of the Snow Church, with its beautiful entrance and enormous altar, stands at the end of the square. The Karlovo Namesti, the largest square in Prague, is the site of the Baroque Saint Ignatius Church, the Town Hall for the New City, the Count Court and 'Casa Faust' a Baroque building at the south end of the square. The city has a first rate public transport system. Tickets are valid for 60 minutes from the moment of purchase during the week and for a 90 minute period at the week-ends. The metropolitan has three lines A-B-C ( Skalka- Dejvicka), (Cerny Most- Zlicin) and ( Holesovice-Haje). It is possible to change stations at Muzeum, Mustek and Florenc. The metropolitan operates every day, from 5am to mid-night. During rush hours the trains depart every 2-3 minutes, during other periods the wait can be from 4-10 minutes. It is possible to reach the top of Petrin Hill by means of a rack- rail train, which calls at Ujezd, Nebozizek and Petrin. The train operates every day from 9am to 11pm (Summer) and from 9:15 to 8:45pm (Winter). Departures are every 10-15 minutes. [[[Prague - Not to be missed]]] Kampa Island is situated south of Mala Strana and is linked at its extreme northern point by the Charles Bridge. The most picturesque island in Prague and once the property of the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem: the houses here look out directly onto the water, mills and parks. Na Kampè Square situated directly under the bridge is the ideal location to spend a relaxing moment. The Petrin Hill, is 318 metres tall and is the site of 8 parks which group together to form the most extensive green open space in Prague. It is easily reached by rack railway and is ideal for pleasant strolls and for admiring the view over the city. The Tower of Petrin, which stands to the north of the park, resembles the Eiffel Tower and can be climbed by means of its 299 steps. [[[Prague - Walks and tours]]] Zbraslav Castle is situated 10 km south of Prague. Karlstejn Castle is located a further 20km south- west, which contains notable works of art. Continuing in the same direction for a further 15km and the visitor arrives at Krivoklat Castle , a Gothic -Roman construction, built to the orders of King Venceslao I and which today houses a Czech-Gothic art museum. Konopiste Castle stands 45km south-east of Prague. The castle is famous for its collection of weapons and hunting trophies. In an old suburb beyond the river Moldava, it is possible to visit the 16th century Troy Castle, surrounded by a large park, home to the city's zoo. The Veltrusy Castle, built in Rococo and Imperial style, at the beginning of the 18th century, is located 30km north east of the city. Two kilometres further, is the site of the Nelahozeves, built in Renaissance style and home to a Czech art gallery. Melnik is a pretty town immersed in the country, in the centre of the Bohemian wine region, at the point where the Moldava river meets the Elba. The town is the site of Saint Peter and Paul's Church and the Town hall. The Gothic castle dominates the town. It is possible to visit the old rooms and wine cellars, where, paying a supplement, it is possible to take part in one of the organised wine-tasting sessions. Beroun, a town to the south-west of Prague, is the departure point for visiting the Koneprus Caves, which are located 6km south. These 600 metre deep limestone caves are open every day from April to September and house rich rock formations, human bones, a rhinoceros and a 15th century forge. [[[Prague - A pocket guide]]] Shopping in Prague has a little pinch of finesse. The Golden Cross is the city's most important shopping centre. An elegant pedestrianized zone , where it is possible to acquire Bohemian crystal, antiques, objects of art and records and Cds of classical music. The roads which make up the Golden Cross are the Vaclavske Namesti in Venceslao Square and Na Prikope, Ulice 28.Rijna and Narodni Trida. Prague's most famous flea market is in Praz Trznice in Holesovice. The market is held every Saturday and Sunday from 12.30. The best furnished large store is Kotva, in Namesti Republiky 8 in Stare Mesto. The Vinarna are a curious aspect of Prague. These places have for centuries, offered tastings of fine wine accompanied with excellent food. Some of the finest Vinarna are to be found in the medieval part of the city at Stare Mesto and in the Baroque houses in Mala Strana. The automats of Venceslao Square are another interesting aspect of Prague: these self service areas, where guests eat standing up, offer quick snacks at reasonable prices. Like many city's steeped in history, Prague too offeres a rich calendar of musical events. The most important is the Prague Spring, held beteween 12th May and the 12th of June, with dances, concerts and theatre plays in the park. The Jazz on the island of Slovansky is held in the month of June. The Theatre festival on the island of Strelecky and the modern dance festival in the Smetana Theatre and the Magic Lantern, take place in the month of July. The 28th of October is the festival celebrating the proclamation of the Czech Republic. The celebrations take place at the castle and the Staromestske Namesti.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Copenhagen Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Copenhagen - Out and About]]] Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark and the largest city in the entire Scandinavian Area. The city, with its monuments and museums, is a cultural centre of such prestigious proportions, that it has been dubbed 'Paris of the North'. Copenhagen, situated at the extreme eastern point of the island of Sjaelland occupying also the near island of Amager, looks out onto Oresund in the Baltic Sea. The strategic position of the city played a fundamental role in establishing Copenhagen as a important port and sea-trading area. Today however the city has become an important Danish industrial centre, and boasts important activities in the mechanical, petrochemical and food industries. In spite of Copenhagen's high geopolitical importance, it has however managed to maintain a calm and relaxing air, little influenced by modernization and new architecture. The city has vast pedestrianized areas and large open spaces, that give Copenhagen a human feel. The city's skyline is not dominated by tall skyscrapers, but rather by old houses with pointed roofs. The centre isn't congested with traffic or smelling of car exhaust fumes, but full of bicycles and scented with the sweet smell of freshly baked bread. The museums, restaurants and a lively night-life contribute to the fascination of this European city with the provincial heart. But the city's true strength lies in its lively, creative, friendly and anti-convential residents, who, with their civic maturity, make Copenhagen one of the cities with the highest quality of life in the world. [[[Copenhagen - Not to be missed]]] The Statens Museum for Kunst is definitely the most important museum of art in the whole of Scandanavia and one of the most important in Europe. The museum is housed in a large building dating back to 1896, built to house the private art collection of the Danish royal family, who remained without a suitable site for their art collection after the fire at the Christianborg in 1884. Some of the most important collections include Italian, Dutch and Flemish artists from the 13th to 15th century, French artists from the 19th and 20th century and Danish works from the 18th to the 20th century. Some of the artists present include Mantegna, Tintoretto, Tiziano, Parmigianino, Matisse, Modagiani, Picasso, Braque, and Chagall. The museum is open from Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm ( Wednesday until 8pm). Tivoli, created in 1843 on the site of the old city wall, is Copenhagen's well-known amusement park. In addition to the fair ground; the complex houses, restaurants, theatres and concert halls and is decorated with colourful flower beds and graceful swans, who glide across the various lakes. More than 5 million people annually visit Tivoli. [[[Copenhagen - Walks and tours]]] A tour of the city can start in Stroget, the long pedestrianized area between Radhuspladsen and Kongens Nytorv, which represents the fundamental axis of the historic centre of Copenhagen. Although it has a Neo-classic look to it , the Von Fue Kirke, located at the beginning of Norregardes is one of the oldest churches in the city.The Helligandskirke, destroyed and rebuilt numerous times, before acquiring its present Renaissance look, is located a short distance away. Amagertorv, a beautiful square surrounded by 16th and 17th century buildings, forms the nucleus of the historic city centre of Copenhagen. Continuing along the Kolmagergade, the city's main street, the visitor arrives at the Rundertarn, a round tower which forms part of a renaissance building, dating back to 1637. The tower is topped by a rotating dome, used as an astronomic observatory. The island of Slotsholmen, to the east, is the site of the Christianborg castle, destroyed numerous times by fire and finally completely re-built in 1907 in its present Rococo style. The castle's interior serves as function rooms for official Court occasions. The National Museum, the most important museum detailing the history of the Danish civilization, is located a short distance away and is open Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm. The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, is a highly important museum. The building dating back to 1888, houses the private collection of Carl and Ottilia Jacobsen, Danish merchants and owners of the famous Carlsberg brewery. The collection includes ancient Roman-Greek artefacts and French impressionist masterpieces. By taking the Bredgade and crossing the Frederiksstad district, it is possible to visit the Analienborg royal residence. The building, constructed between 1750 and 1768, is a harmonious complex of four almost identical Rococo palaces, which surround an octaagonal square, site of a statue of King Friederich V on horseback. This is the location of the daily changing of the guard ceremony. Leaving the square and continuing along Amaliegade, brings the visitor to the Kastellet, a citadel built to compliment Copenhagen's fortifications. A beautiful walk along Langelinie, at the side of this complex, leads to the famous mermaid statue ( Lille Havfrue), symbol of the city. Upon returning towards the centre, a visit to the Rosenborg Slot ( Rosenborg Castle ) and the surrounding Rosenborg Have park, is obligatory. The castle, a beautiful Danish Renaissance building, whose construction started in 1606, was only occupied by the royal family for a short 80- year period, during which time the Rosenborg family started to collect notable art trasures. The building has today been transformed into a wonderful museum, with a particularly interesting Crown jewels collection. It's not necessary to have the use of a car in order to enjoy visiting the city. The major attractions are all located within easy walking distance or a short bus jorney away. The public transport system is both large and efficient. It consists of a 10-line metropolitan network and a bus service ( hovedstadsomradets Trafikselskab), which has its terminus in Radhuspladsen. Fares vary depending on the zone. [[[Copenhagen - A pocket guide]]] Copenhagen is a very lively city in the evening, but can be a delusion during the day. The best days are Thursday to Saturday, with Friday evening being the high-light of the week. The largest concentration of pubs and clubs are located around the zones of Nyhaven and Stroget. In the past the cuisine in offer in Copenhagen's restaurants was not held in great regard, however with the opening of new quality restaurants this situation has changed greatly. Copenhagen has a wide choice of foreign restaurants in particular French and Oriental, however it is also recommended to try the various restaurants offering modern Danish cooking.</testo> 
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 <titolo>York Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[York - Out and About]]] The city of York situated in northern England, on the banks of the river Ouse is nestled in the York valley and forms a natural communication channel between England and Scotland. York was originally settled by the Romans in 71 BC and given the name Eboracum. During the Saxon era the name was changed to Eforowic and the city became a centre for the diffusion of both Christianity and the medieval culture. Later, the city was declared the capital of a Danish Kingdom and given the name Yorvik. The period from 1100 to 1500 saw York establish itself as England’s second city and grow to become a strong business centre. The old city is enclosed within an ancient 4.8km long wall. Even today ,York bears signs of its historic and noble past, including its Georgian buildings, St Helen’s Square with its Gothic church and York’s famous cathedral, which dates back to James 1st period and is regarded as one of the finest in England. St Helen’s Square is flanked by interesting and historic buildings. The square forms the departure point for the pedestrianized Stonegate Street. The street, lined with old shops, sits on top of the ancient Roman road: Via Praetoria. The Neo-Classic Mansion House (1730) is located in the south west corner of the square. The Assembly Rooms in Blake Street are located to the north of the square. This elegant Palladian style building has an interesting interior, which includes a room with 50 Corinthian columns. The geographical centre of the city is formed by the wide Parliament Street, and The Pavement. Parliament Street is the site of the Mail Coach Inn, built above the remains of an old Roman Baths and The Pavement is lined with numerous ancient timber- framed buildings. Other fine examples of 15th Century Medieval timber-framed buildings can be seen in the shops lining The Shambles. Splendid examples of Gothic timber-framed architecture can be seen in the 14th Century Trinity Chapel and the Merchant Adventurers’ Hall. The Hall, located at N° 40 Fossgate, was occupied by a merchant corporation and possesses an ancient hospital. The road that leads from Fossgate to Walmgate, houses the Gothic church of St Denys and St Margaret’s Church, with its beautiful Norman Door (1160). The original site of the Coppergate settlement is now home to the reconstruction of a Viking village street. Visitors can pass along the street on board a small train. The Jorvik Viking Centre presents an exhibition which illustrates the various stages of the archaeological excavation, which has brought to light England’s best preserved example of a Viking village. St Mary’s Church in Castelgate is the site of the Heritage Centre, which houses the “York Story,” a permanent display about the history of the city. Fairfax House is located nearby and was the Georgian residence of Viscount Fairfax. The building contains a ballroom,cinema and a fine collection of porcelain and 18th century watches. Clifford’s Tower, built at the request of Henry 3rd, stands on a man- made hill, originally the site of a wooden fort erected by William the Conqueror. The York Castle Museum stands next to Clifford’s Tower and hosts the Eye of York, an English folklore museum, which has reconstructions of a dining room from the James 1st period; a typical cottage from the Yorkshire moors and Kirgate, an imaginary Victorian street complete with houses, shops and horse-drawn carriages. The National Railway Museum is located in Leeman Street and is the largest museum of its kind in the world. The museum is dedicated to two centuries of British railway history and houses examples of locomotives, railway artefacts, Queen Victoria’s railway carriage together with the latest developments in the field of railway transport. York is a small, historic city with narrow streets and is therefore best seen on foot. The city’s various sites are all located relatively close to each other and the pedestrianized areas are among the largest in Europe. The best way to approach the city centre is to leave your car in one of the Park and Ride areas. This service, available in all areas around the city, permits the driver to park his car free of charge and to take bus to the centre. The buses are modern and they run frequently. The ticket price is low and children under the age of sixteen, travel free, when accompanied by an adult. [[[York - Not to be missed]]] The medieval wall, one of the finest example in Europe, runs for 5 km. encompassing the city. The external part of the wall can be observed while driving or walking around the Ring Road. A more interesting view of the wall can be had while patrolling around the top of it from gate to gate, referred to as “bars”. Monk Bar is the finest example of the city’s gates. Located at the end of Goodramgate, it is built on three levels, with a fully working portcullis. Amongst the various carved figures, decorating the gate, are men ready to hurl stones at the city’s invaders. York Minster is the largest medieval church in England. This Gothic masterpiece contains a large number of stained glass windows. The windows are notable for the wide variety of themes featured in them, from subjects chosen by clerical donaters to those reflecting York Minster ecclesiastical patronage. The north face of the church is undoubtedly the most beautiful. The west towers are characterised by pinnacles and flaming red decoration, which contrasts with the simpler structure of the northern transept. [[[York - Walks and tours]]] Visiting the Yorkshire countryside is the best way to capture the authentic spirit of this region. The landscape in this area is characterised by moor-land, lush valleys and picturesque villages. The area is served by the A1, M1, M62 and the A59 roads. The Intercity train calls at York and Leeds and it is from here that trains and buses depart to link the outlying villages. Yorkshire extends along three main valleys: Swaledale, Wharfedale and Wensleydale and along a series of minor valleys, such as Deepdale. The steep sides of this valley create an interesting contrast with the surrounding moor-land. The area is a national park and offers many possibilities for magical walks and open-air pastimes. A tour of Swaledale allows the visitor to follow the river Swale which crosses the moor and then descends a series of waterfalls, before arriving at the lower slopes near the villages of Richmond, Reeth and Thwaite. Grassington is the departure point for a visit to Wharfedale, a valley characterised by the contrast between the moor, the limestone rock and the riverside village. The more experienced hikers are attracted by Yorkshire’s Three Peaks: Whernside (736 mt.), Ingleborrough (724 mt) and Pen-y-Ghent (794 mt). Those able to climb the three summits and complete the 32 km. route in under 12 hours can become a member of the Three Peaks of Yorkshire Club. Castle Howard, residence of the Count of Carlyle, is situated east of the A64, north-east of York. This neo-classic palace is surrounded by a magnificent garden and an enormous park. Paid entrance allows the visitor to admire the building’s interior and its italian frescos. In the Orleans room there are portraits by Carracci, Parmigianino and Rubens. The building’s chapel houses works by Sansovino and the Pre-Raphelite glass-work by Burne-Jones. [[[York - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : English pound, sub-divided into 100 pence Electric supply: 240 volts. The plugs require the use of an adaptor. Climate : May and June can be both cold and sunny. July and August are the only months when fine weather is guaranteed, with temperatures which vary from 25°C to 28°C. The temperature drops below freezing in winter with strong winds and rain. The wettest months are April, September and November. Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm; some open until 10pm and others close at 5:30pm. Telephones : To call dial 0044, followed by the area code without the initial zero. [[[York - A pocket guide]]] National holidays: Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday. Other holidays include: May Day Holiday, the 1st of May, Spring Bank Holiday, the last Monday in May and the Summer Bank Holiday, the last Monday in August.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Oxford Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Oxford - Out and About]]] Oxford, the county town of Oxfordshire, is located amongst elegant gardens and parks at the point where the river Cherwell flows into the river Thames. The site, where the city now stands, was originally a market square, during the Anglo-Saxon period. During the Augustan period, with the construction of both an abbey and castle, the town established itself as a strategic, commercial and religious centre. Over the centuries, Oxford has become the most important English university city, renown throughout the world for its colleges, buildings and churches. Oxford, located 60 km from London, is surrounded by some of the most picturesque English countryside. The first-time visitor to Oxford is immediately struck by the city’s elegant architecture and splendid parks. The city’s two rivers, the Cherwell and the Isis, offer numerous possibilities for leisurely strolls along the bank or relaxing boat trips. The name Oxford, like that of its sister university Cambridge, is closely linked to the ancient colleges, churches and squares, which line the city’s main street (High Street). The history of the university dates back to 1163, when university professors and students, expelled from the University of Paris, established themselves in Oxford. In the centuries to follow, the first large university complexes were built, including University College, Balloil College and Merton College. The colleges, which make up Oxford University, presently number 36. They were designed around the concept of monastery buildings, some of which still exist today in their original state. The buildings exude atmosphere, history, privilege and tradition. The Gothic style Christ Church, built in 1525, is the largest in the city and was initially founded as a college for the instruction of Cardinals. Merton College, founded in 1264, is Oxford’s oldest college; the site of the chapel choir houses carvings detailing allegories of Grammar, Rhetoric and Music. The most beautiful and characteristic of the colleges, is Magdalen College, situated next to a botanical garden, at the end of the High Street. The 14th Century college court- yards, built in contrasting styles, are situated in a park near the Magdalen Bridge, which spans the river Cherwell. According to a five-hundred year old tradition, the college choir annually sing at 6 in the morining, on the 1st of May, from the top of the college bell tower. It is usually possible to visit the colleges between 2pm and 5pm, but there is however no fixed timetable. The Bodlean Library, founded in 1602 by Th. Bodley, is one of only six libraries, which has the right to receive a copy of every book published in Great Britain. The library has a world famous collection of books and volumes and its 130 km of underground tunnels houses important manuscripts and valuable first editions of Greek and Latin authors. The Radcliffe Camera, a round, domed building in Baroque style, once formed part of the original library and today houses the library’s reading room. The vast Blackwell book shop, in Broad Street, has over 20,000 titles available. The city of Oxford promotes a policy of traffic and pollution reduction and operates a highly efficient bus service. The city’s Park and Ride system, in force in a five mile zone around Oxford, allows the motorist to park his car for free and to travel into the city centre by bus. Buses run along preferential lanes, avoiding traffic and subsequent delays. Children, accompanied by adults, travel free ( maximum 3 children to 1 adult ). The city centre is pedestrianized and travelling around by car is practically impossible. The buses can approach the city centre but cannot arrive directly at the city’s designated shopping zone. [[[Oxford - Not to be missed]]] Oxford offers a vast range of museums and interesting places to visit, including Saint Mary the Virgin Church, the university’s official church and the most visited in England. The church founded in the 14th Century, possesses a note-worthy south door, built in Baroque style. Saint Mary’s stands on the site where the Oxford Martyrs were declared heretics in 1555. The numerous valuable buildings, in a variety of styles and periods, make Oxford one of the most picturesque and artistically rich cities in England. The Ashmolean Museum, founded in 1683, is the oldest museum in England. The museum originally housed the results of the work of the collectionist Tradescantes, including stuffed animals, plants and tribal artefacts. What remains of the original collection has now taken second place to the collection of paintings by Bellini, Raffello, Turner and Rembrandt. The museum also houses Greek and Roman sculptures and the precious 1000 year- old gold enamel Alfred Jewel ring. Other interesting museums are located nearby: the University Museum, a museum of natural history housed in a large, glass-roofed Victorian building and the Pitt Rivers Museum, which houses ethnographic collections of masks, African and Oriental totems and the exhibits once belonging to the explorer Cook . Magnificent views over the city can be obtained from the Carfax Tower (open every day from April to October),which stands on the ancient site of Carfax, the meeting point for the roads which cross Oxford, running north to south and east to west. [[[Oxford - Walks and tours]]] Woodstock is located 13km from Oxford, and is the site of Blenheim Palace. This architectural masterpiece, in Baroque style, is set in 850 hectares of parkland. The palace was a gift from Queen Anne to the Duke of Marlborough John Churchill in 1704, following Chuchill’s defeat of the French in the Battle of Blenheim. The palace was also the birth place of the statesman Winston Churchill. The magnificent 16th Century parkland, contains ornate flowerbeds, fountains and magnificent monuments. Oxford The traveller's notebook Currency : English pound, sub-divided into 100 pence Electric suply: 240 volts. The plugs require the use of an adaptor. Climate : May and June can be both cold and sunny. July and August are the only months when fine weather is guaranteed, with temperatures which vary from 25°C to 28°C. The temperture drops below freezing in winter with strong winds and rain. The wettest months are April, September and November. Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm; some open until 10pm and others close at 5:30pm. Museums and galleries are open Monday to Saturday, from10am to 6pm and Sunday from 2pm to 6pm. Telephones : To call dial 0044, followed by the area code without the initial zero. [[[Oxford - A pocket guide]]] National holidays: Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday. Other holidays include: May Day Holiday, the 1st of May, Spring Bank Holiday, the last Monday in May and the Summer Bank Holiday, the last Monday in August.</testo> 
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 <titolo>London Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[London - Out and About]]] London, the capital city of England, originally occupied just the left bank of the river Thames. The city now boasts 32 districts and 7 million inhabitants. Its residents come from the four corners of the globe, speak a total of over 300 languages and represent all the world’s religions. London is a city with many hearts, which the visitor can find both fascinating and at the same time disorientating. The city’s many centres are in a state of constant change, both architecturally and socially. London is a busy and complex city, an intricate web of buildings, spaces and people; where there is the ever present risk for the visitor of getting lost. London is vast and would require years in order to explore it in-depth. A list of things to see could also be misleading, given the richness and diversity of what the city has to offer. Therefore it is advisable for each person to choose those things in which he is most interested. A possible solution may be for the visitor to limit himself to the five zones which contain the highest concentration of London’s major sights: Whitehall, Westminster, The City, Soho, Trafalgar Square, South Kensington and Knightsbridge. The City, located on the left bank of the Thames, is the heart of London. This area was the original site of the Roman city, which over a period of 2000 years, has become the present day London. An open-space in the centre of The City, marks the point where eight roads converge. This space is the site of the Bank of England, the Old Stock Exchange and the residence of the Mayor of London. The City of Westminster, a short distance up-river, began to develop in the 11th Century, shortly after the Norman conquest. Home to Westminster Abbey, the coronation site and the final resting place for England’s Kings and Queens, which today functions both as an official church and a national museum. Westminster Hall, now incorporated in the Houses of Parliament ,is all that remains from the period of reign of the Norman kings. Buckingham Palace, the official London residence of the Queen, stands at one end of St James’ Park. The park’s grounds stretch from Parliament to Trafalgar Square, home to the tall column, which commemorates Lord Nelson. Number 10 Downing Street, is located a short distance away and is the official residence of the British Prime Minister. The road which, runs along the river from Westminster to The City, is the most important in London. This road bears two names, at its starting point, it is referred to as the Strand, whilst in The City it has the name Fleet Street. In order to protect the city and its port, the Norman kings built the Tower of London. The building, which also served as a prison, and home to the English kings from William the Conqueror to James 1st , now houses the crown jewels. The elegant districts of West End, Mayfair, Belgravia, Marylebone and Kensington stretch to the north and west of Westminster, and contain numerous spacious parks: St James, Hyde Park, Kensington Gardens, Regent’s Park, Soho and Bloomsbury. These districts are criss-crossed by large busy streets including: Piccadilly, Bond Street, Park Lane, Knightsbridge, Regent’s Street, Oxford Street, Charing Cross Road and Haymarket. In the eastern part of the city, in the boroughs of Newham, Tower Hamlets and Southwark, the area of the old docks serves as a reminder of the poverty of this zone of the city. The residential districts stretch throughout the city towards the green slopes of Hampstead, Highgate and St John’s Wood and onwards to Wimbledon and Richmond parks; ideal for those who love long walks. The public transport network is enormous. London is divided into five circular zones and tickets are valid for individual travel within each zone. Visitors usually limit themselves to travelling within the first three zones. It is recommended to purchase a travelcard, available from station ticket-booths. Once purchased, the travelcard permits the holder to travel anywhere within the chosen zone on all means of public transport, including the Docklands Light Railway and the British Rail trains within that zone. The travelcard is not valid during public holidays, for night-time bus journeys or before 9:30 am. The Weekly Travelcard is valid 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for travel in the chosen zone. It is possible to view the city from one of the famous red double-decker buses. The buses leave daily from Piccadilly Circus every half hour from 10am until 5pm. The faster, single-decker, red buses run from Westminster to Victoria (line C1) from Monday to Saturday and operate a fixed- rate fare. The London Metropolitan, the Tube, is the oldest underground system in the world. The system operates every day of the year with the exception of Christmas Day. From Monday to Saturday the first train is 5:30 am, the last 11.30; on Sunday 7.30am /12:30. Each of the eleven lines has both a name and a colour. Taxis, called black cabs, charge high fares; minicabs, which can be pre-booked by phone, are less expensive and call directly to the door. [[[London - Not to be missed]]] Catch the Charing Cross line to Trafalgar Square in order to visit the National Gallery. It is advisable to divide the gallery tour into various different days, in order to see its vast quantity of European masterpieces. Entrance is free and the gallery houses a café, restaurant and a book and souvenir shop. The Victoria and Albert Museum has galleries housing paintings, designs, sculptures and clothing. A café and self service restaurant are located in the gallery courtyard. Tube stop, Cromwell Road on the South Kensington line. A mid-week visit to the British Museum, in Great Russel Street, is highly recommended. Entrance is free and the museum houses two copies of the Magna Charta, the Parthenon Frieze, a watch and miniature collection and the world’s largest collection of antique art. The museum also has a large and well-stocked book and souvenir shop. Tube stop; Russell Square on the Holborn Line. The Tate Gallery hosts important contemporary art exhibitions. Entrance is free. The gallery is located on the Pimlico tube- line. Visit Kew gardens: its historic green-houses, allow the visitor to admire the vast assortment of flora gathered from around the world. Tube stop: Kew Bridge. [[[London - Walks and tours]]] One of the most evocative walks in the city, is a stroll along the banks of the River Thames, best undertaken either early in the morning or late in the evening, when the light reflects off the water, the bridges and the fronts of buildings. Depart from Waterloo Station on the south bank of the river, an ideal view point to appreciate the city’s myriad of colours. A visit to the South Bank Centre is a must. This complex houses cinemas, museums, galleries of art and the Bramah Museum: a museum dedicated to coffee and tea, which has a shop with the same theme, located below Tower Bridge. Exploring the English countryside, especially along the West Coast, is possible either by car, boat, on foot or using public transport. [[[London - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : English pound, sub-divided into 100 pence Electricity supply: 240 volts. The plugs require the use of an adaptor. Climate : May and June can be both cold and sunny. July and August are the only months when fine weather is guaranteed, with temperatures which vary from 25°C to 28°C. The temperture drops below freezing in winter with strong winds and rain. The wettest months are April, September and November. Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm; some open until 10pm and others close at 5:30pm Supermarkets close around 8pm with late night-shopping one day during the week, usually Thursday. Sunday opening is allowed,but only for a six- hour period, either 10am to 4pm or 12:00 to 6pm. Museums and galleries are open Monday to Saturday, from10am to 6pm and Sunday from 2pm to 6pm. Telephones : To call to London dial 0044, followed by the area code without the initial zero. [[[London - A pocket guide]]] London can satisfy the shopping tastes of everyone. Naturally it helps to know where the best places to shop are located. There are shops which offer end of line and designer sales; articles of fashion from past collections and second hand shops, which are now very much in vogue. The various flea markets are a veritable treasure trove: Bermondey Market( Tower Hill tube-stop, bus route 78) Portobello market in Portobello Road ( Notting hill Gate or Ladbroke Grove tube-stop),Camden Lock( Camden tube-stop). For Victorian Antiques. Camden Passage (Angel tube-stop). For fashion shops and boutiques: Sloane Street.. Marks and Spencer is located in Oxford Street. Marble Arch is home to Virgin, HMV, H&M, Top Shop, Borders, Next, Gap and Muji. Burberry, Aquascutum,Church’s, Jaeger, Country Casuals, Dickins and Jones and Hamleys are all located in Regent Street. Covent Garden is the place to go to find oriental handcrafts and food. The Charing Cross book stores offer rare and antique books covering all topics: Foyles and Bell, book and Radmall (Leicester Square tube-stop). The large department stores are original but the visitor can find the size of these shops a little disorientating: Harrods, Harvey Nichols( Knightsbridge tube-stop) and Liberty’s in Regent street. Most districts have their own fruit and flower markets. Brixton ( Brixton tube-stop) is is the most interesting and exotic in the south of London, with Afro-Carribean food, fashion and music.The Leadenhall Market has a medieval theme( Bank tube-stop). London offers international cuisine from around the world. With the creative and refined high-quality of its chefs, London has become the Mecca of gastronomy. Global Food, modern European and Cal – Ital ( a mix of Italian and Californian) are the terms used to describe this phenomenon. The majority of the restaurants serve lunch from 12.30 to 2.30 and dinner from 7pm to 11pm. The pubs open from 11am to 11pm Monday to Saturday and from 12 to 3pm and 7pm to 11pm on Sunday. London has a very active night life and going out in the evening is part of any London holiday. Every evening there are is a wide choice of entertainment from drag acts to comedy from dance clubs to classical music. Choosing is made easier by the publication of the magazines Time Out, Evening standard and Melody Maker, which give detailed information on what the city has to offer. Tickets for exhibitions and shows are bought well in advance from the ticket booths located at Charing Cross Road and Shaftesbury Avenue. An evening in the dischoteque usually follows a pre-chosen theme, with the show starting around 11pm. London is second to none in offering classical music concerts. Its world famous theatres include Covent Garden and the English National Theatre.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Cambridge Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Cambridge - Out and About]]] Cambridge stands on both banks of the river Cam, at the southern edge of the Fens. The river flows through this area creating a wide, lush zone of park-land. Similar to Oxford, Cambridge is a famous university town, rich in parks, gardens and magnificent buildings. Oxford’s main street, King’s Parade is lined with the town’s most famous colleges and is the site of St. Mary the Great and St. Edward Churches. The University of Cambridge comprises 31 colleges, the oldest being Peterhouse, founded in 1284 and the most recent being Robinson, founded in 1979. The colleges stand on either side of the river Cam. The river is spanned by elegant bridges, ,which link the college’s lawns and gardens, forming the grassy stretch of land referred to as the “backs, from where it is possible to see and fully appreciate the college buildings. Both the life and feel of Oxford is closely tied to the presence of these university institutes. King’s College, founded in 1441 by Henry 6th, is one of the most beautiful. It has a magnificent chapel built in late-medieval English style. The visitor should not miss the vaulted, fanned ceiling and the Rubens alter-piece. Trinity College, founded in 1546 by Henry VIII, is the largest university college in England. The complex is a collection of buildings dating back to the start of the 14th Century, which include the magnificent 1676 library located in Nevile’s Court. The building houses allegorical statues which decorate the ceiling and is surrounded by ornate gardens, accessible by crossing a bridge that spans the Cam Queens’ College, built in 1446 in Queens’ Land, has wonderful Tudor buildings and the magnificent timber frame President’s Gallery, built in the 15th century, the gallery sits over the brick arches of the charming Cloister Court. The college has buildings on both banks of the Cam, joined by the romantic Mathematical Bridge,constructed in 1749. St . John’s College, the second largest college in Cambridge is situated in St John’s Street. The college, with its 15th and 16th Century buildings, stretches along both sides of the Cam and possesses two bridges, one built in 1712 and the popular Neo-gothic Bridge of Sighs, built in 1831. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, located in front of St John’s College, was designed as a copy of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The church, constructed in 1130, possesses an unusual round nave. Magdalene College, located in Bridge Street, was built in 1842 and stands on the previous site of old Benedictine college. In the courtyard, a magnificent porticoed building from the late 17th Century, houses the Pepysan Library; bequeathed to the college by the writer Samuel Pepys. The library with its 12 sections, contains over 3000 volumes. Magdalene College in 1987, was the last college to agree to admit female students. Cambridge centre is made up of a network of narrow medieval streets, which are not capable of sustaining the heavy demand of today’s traffic. Furthermore the parking areas within the centre permit owners to leave their cars only for a short period of time. The best solution therefore is to make use of the Park and Ride system which operates around Cambridge. The scheme allows drivers to park their cars free of charge and to take a bus into the centre. The buses run frequently (approx every ten minutes), the return fare is £1.20 and the service operates from 7:30am until 7.30pm. Cambridge is situated 75 minutes away by train from London’s King’s Cross and Liverpool Street stations., or two hours by bus from Victoria Coach Station. Those travelling by car should follow the M11 and exit at junction 11or 12 [[[Cambridge - Not to be missed]]] The Fitzwilliam Museum is amongst one of the oldest public museums. This large Classic building houses works of exceptional quality and rarity. The nucleus of the exhibition is built around the 1816 bequest of Viscount Fitzwilliam. The ground floor Gallery houses displays of Egyptian, Greek, Assyrian and Eagean art, together with Mycanean pottery and bronze artefacts. The Roman Gallery displays Etruscan Roman art, imperial busts, pottery, glass and jewellery. The Rotshchild room houses Palaeolithic drawings, manuscripts from the 9th and 10th Century, illuminated manuscripts including the 14th Century Metz Pontifical and an elegant and highly interesting French liturgical manuscript. The Glashier Collection is rich in English 16th and 17th Century ceramics and pottery. Its fine collection of paintings includes works by Tiziano and the 17th Century Dutch masters, Impressionist works including masterpieces from Manet and Renoir and paintings by Picasso, Matisse, Derain, Modigliani and the major English artists, from Hogarth to Constable and from Bonington to Madox Brown. The Fifth Gallery houses Primitive Italian works. The Seventh Gallery houses Italian Renaissance and Baroque works and the Eighth Gallery has the works of Spanish and Flemish artists including Rubens, Van Dyck and Murillo. The Museum also has a show-case dedicated to Handel, containing some of his musical scores and a further display which contains the original manuscript of Keats’ poem, “Ode to a Nightingale”. [[[Cambridge - Walks and tours]]] Cambridge is situated in East Anglia; a territory that has always safeguarded its tradition and rural character. An area dotted with churches, medieval mills and ancient wind-mills. A 13km-drive eastwards, along the A1303, will take the visitor to the town of Newmarket in Suffolk. Newmarket is the head-quarters of horse-racing, an industry which developed here in the 18th Century and which today sees Newmarket home to 3000 horses in training and two race courses, hosting races from April to October. Newmarket is also home to the National Horseracing Museum, which details the history of this sport over the last 300 years. Saffron Walden is located in Essex, 24km south of Cambridge along the A1301 and B184. This typical East Anglian town has timber framed buildings from the 15th and 16th Century. A truly memorable visit can be made to Audley End House. The house, open from April to October, was built in 1614 for the then ,Lord of the Treasury and 1st Count of Suffolk, Thomas Howard. This Jacobean mansion has conserved its original atrium and fine stuccoed ceilings. During the period 1670 –70, the interior of the house was restyled with Biagio Rebecca frescoes and during the same period, the magnificent parkland, which surrounds the house, was landscaped. [[[Cambridge - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : English pound, sub-divided into 100 pence Electric supply: 240 volts. The plugs require the use of an adaptor. Climate : May and June can be both cold and sunny. July and August are the only months when fine weather is guaranteed, with temperatures which vary from 25°C to 28°C. The temperature drops below freezing in winter with strong winds and rain. The wettest months are April, September and November. Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm Museums and galleries are open Monday to Saturday, from10am to 6pm and Sunday from 2pm to 6pm. [[[Cambridge - A pocket guide]]] National holidays: Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday. Other holidays include: May Day Holiday, the 1st of May, Spring Bank Holiday, the last Monday in May and the Summer Bank Holiday, the last Monday in August.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Helsinki Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Helsinki - Out and About]]] Helsinki, with 532,000 inhabitants is the capital of Finland. The city is situated in front of the Esthonian coast, on a peninsula of the Gulf of Finland. The city and its port are protected from the open sea by an archipelago of 315 islands. Finland, one of the most important ports on the Baltic sea, is the site of flourishing commercial activity and possesses notable cultural importance. The city is of relatively modest proportions and if compared with other Scandinavian capitals, could be said to be very tranquil almost provincial. However Helsinki, is formed from a fusion of various cultures which renders it unique. Helsinki has the largest foreign community in the whole country and the Swedish and Russian influence is very evident in the architecture, food and language. Characterized by a mild climate with respect to the rest of the Finnish territory, Helsinki is a lively place, with pleasant and friendly inhabitants, clean streets and plenty of parks and open spaces. The city centre houses the 19th century buildings, designed by the German architect Carl Engel and give the zone the feel of a miniature Saint Petersburg. The centre is built up around the Etelasatama port and has as its focal point the Kauppatori (Fish Market), which is located along the sea-front between the ferry gang planks and surrounded by elegant 18th century buildings. These fine buildings fortunately survived the Russian bombardments during the Second World War. The 'Havis Amanda', the fountain with the statue of the ' Sea maiden', symbol of the city, is located a short distance away. The Pohjoisesplanadi is the site of the Presidential Palace, residence of the President of the Finnish Republic. The island of Katajanokka, in the zone of Kauppatori, is the site of Orthodox Uspenski Cathedral, interesting for the icons which decorate the interior. The role of cultural crossroads between the east and west, so typical of Helsinki, is perfectly synthesized in the contrast between the gold, onion shaped dome of the Uspenski Cathedral, a building that would not be out of place in a Moscow square and the essential lines of architecture of Finland Hall, one of the finest representation of the great Finnish architect Alvar Aalto, one of the fathers of Modernism and Functionalism. Finland Hall is located in Mannerheimintie, the widest street in Helsinki and home to the Parliament Palace, built in 1931. Guided tours to view the Palace's interior are organised during the summer months and are free of charge. The Lutheran Tuomiokirkko Cathedral is located in the important Senaatintori, the Senate Square, the neoclassic heart of the city. Completed in 1852 by Carl Engel, the Lutheran Cathedral is notable for its blue dome and for the fantastic views that it offers. The best views over the city, however, are to be had from the top of the Stadium, a 72 metre high tower, located in the Olympic Stadium. The tower is open Monday to Friday from 9am to 8pm weekdays and from 9am to 6pm at the week-ends. The Sibelius Park is located a little further to the west and is the site of the impressive iron-tube sculpture dedicated to the great Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. Helsingin Kaupungin Liikennelaitos operates the public transport system in Helsinki, which comprises bus, metropolitan and tram service together with a ferry to the island of Suomenlinna. The single fare on each type of transport costs Euro 1.50. Tickets can be purchased from newspaper stands, the metropolitan stations and the Tourist Office in Pohjoisesplanadi 19. The buses and trams run from 5:45am to midnight. The metropolitan functions from 6am to midnight. [[[Helsinki - Not to be missed]]] One of the greatest attractions in Helsinki is the Temppeliaukio Church, dug out of solid rock and topped with a copper dome. The church is also the site of numerous musical presentations and is open from 10am to 8pm weekdays, from 10am to 6pm on Saturdays and from 12 until 1:45pm and from 3:30pm to 5:45pm on Sundays. Helsinki, an important artistic and cultural centre, boasts a large number of museums. Its museums of art include the Atheneum, the Sinebrychoff Museum of Foreign Art and the recently inaugurated Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art. The Atheneum, situated in Kaivokkatu 2, houses an important collection of Finnish art from the 17th century through to the 1950's. Kiasma is the home to a collection of contemporary Finnish and international art. Both museums are open Tuesday and Friday from 9am to 6pm, Wednesday and Thursday from 9am to 8pm and Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 5pm. The Sinebrychoff, in Bulevardi 40, is dedicated to foreign art and is open Monday, Thursday and Friday from 9am to 5pm, Wednesday from 9am to 8pm and Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 5pm. The Seurasaari open air museum is very interesting. It is situated on the island of the same name and allows visitors to view original 17th and 18th century Finnish houses, in a setting complete with local folklore and craftsmen displaying their skills. The museum is open every day in the summer from 11am to 5pm (Wednesdays until 7pm). The particularly inquisitive visitor can choose to visit the many other museums dedicated to a whole range of subjects including the Naval Museum, the Natural History Museum, The Post Museum, the Museum of Sport, the Military Museum and the Museum of Finnish Architecture. [[[Helsinki - Walks and tours]]] Suomenlinna, one of the many islands that surround Helsinki, has been declared a world heritage site by Unesco. Referred to as ' the Fortress of Finland', it was built in 1748 by the Swedish Emperor, to defend against Russian attacks from the east. It is formed from two islands, linked by a small bridge. Mustasaari and Susisaari islands are today the site of numerous interesting museums including the magical Toy and Doll Museum. A favoured tourist attraction in the summer, Suomenlinna also possesses a number of restaurants and bars. Ferries arrive here from Kauppatori, leaving every 35 minutes. The trip takes 15 minutes. [[[Helsinki - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220V, 50Hz Climate : Helsinki, thanks to its position on the Baltic Sea and the light winds of the Gulf Current, enjoys a mild climate, compared with other places of the same latitude. However in winter it is very cold, with average temperatures in January of -6°C. The average summer temperatures can however reach 19°C. The summer nights are short and never truly dark, while in winter daylight lasts only a few hours. Language : Finnish and Swedish Opening hours : shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm and Saturday from 9am to 1pm.The large shops and shopping centres are open weekdays from 9am to 9pm and Saturday from 9am to 6pm. Offices are open from 8am to 5pm Telephones : To call Finland from Italy it is necessary to dial one of the international access codes (999, 990, 994 or 00) followed by 0039, the area code and the private number.To call Italy from Finland dial 00358, followed by the area code without the initial zero and the private number. The national code for Helsinki is 09. [[[Helsinki - A pocket guide]]] The Fins like to go out in the evenings and Helsinki is therefore a lively place throughout the week, although Sunday and Monday tend to be quieter. The most popular pubs, bars and clubs are located in a relatively small area, in the centre of the city and east in Mannerheimintie. Almost all of them close between 2 and 4am. Finnish restaurants can be found throughout the city and offer game and fish specialities. There is also a wide choice of foreign cuisine. In particular the Russian restaurants, which have a fine reputation.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Paris Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Paris - Out and About]]] Paris the capital city of France and the county city of the Ile de France region, is situated in the northern central part of France. The city is divided into 20 districts. Each district has a number, which increases in value, the further away one goes from the Louvre museum. The historic centre of the city is formed by the first eight districts, stretching from the Bastille to Etoile and from the Opera to the Observatory. The area houses the various architectural styles of the 19th century that Napoleon III requested to be built in the city. This centre, divided in two by the river Seine contains narrow windy streets, crowded with offices, shops and craftsmen's workshops. The first and second districts, are the sites of the city's business zone, home to the stock exchange, banks and insurance companies. The elite area of the city, the Tuilieres, is located to the west. The area leads from one end to the Place de La Concorde and at the other to the Louvre. This was the residential area of the King and today is the site of elegant buildings ( Place de La Concorde, Place Vendome, Place des Victories), Italian gardens ( Jardin du Palais Royal, Jardin des Tuilieres), old royal palaces ( Louvre, Palais Royal) and important museums ( Museum of Arts and Fashion, Museum of Decorative Arts). The area is divided by elegant roads lined with five star hotels ( Ritz, Normandie), expensive boutiques, jewellers and large department stores( Trois Quartiers, Printemps). Five districts stretch along the right bank, including the tree-lined Champs-Elysees, which leads to the Arc di Triumph and Grand Boulevard between the Opera, Republic, Pigalle and Montmatre. The Avenue des Champs- Elysees, is both wide and spectacular and symbolises the style and joie de vivre of Paris. The area and the surrounding streets house public gardens, luxurious restaurants, design studios, theatres, museums, galleries, cinemas, hotels and cafés. The Avenue finishes at the beautiful Rond Point des Champs-Elysees, with its colourful flowerbeds and nut trees. The avenue is particularly beautiful, when illuminated at night and on the 14th July during the military parade. The Butte Montmartre district is synonymous with art; for it was here, during the 19th century, that poets and artists gathered. The shortest road leaves from Place Blanche and climbs the lively Rue Lepic market street, continuing on along Rue de Abbesses, Rue Ravignon and other flights of steps. A spectacular view of the city can be obtained by taking the rack-railway to the Roman- Byzantine Sacre Coeur church. Portrait artists and souvenir sellers congregate at Place du Tertre, a picturesque square and high-point of Paris.In this zone it is possible to stroll through the narrow twisting streets, admire the small, pretty squares and walk along the small hill-side terraces. The Germain-de-Pres district is located on the east bank of the Seine and is home to cafés, jazz-clubs and antique shops. It is an area which was frequented by intellectuals during the 1950's and 60's at the time of Novelle Vague. The well-known Lipp brasserie, decorated with multi-coloured tiles, is a favourite meeting point for politicians, while Les Deux Margots, the preferred choice of Hemingway, is still popular today. The city's other artist's district is Montparnasse, frequented by such artists as Picasso and Matisse. The district, situated on the left bank, is the site of Carrefour Vavin with its studios and cafes, very popular during the 1920's and 30's.Today the area houses cinemas and restaurants and is the site of the second largest tower in Europe, the glass and steel Tour de Montparnasse. The Montparnasse Cemetery, situated in Rue Emile Richard, is the resting place of writers, poets and sculpturers ( De Maupassant, Sartre, De Beauvoir, Tzara, Baudelaire). The Eiffel Tower stands to the south of the river in the area known as Rive Gauche. Napoleon's tomb is housed in the gold-domed Hotel des Invalides, situated in the largest area south of the river. This is a wealthy zone with aristocratic residences lining the Rue de Varennes and the Rue de Grenelle. The Paris university district ( Sorbon) is the Paris of narrow Medieval streets, bookshops, cinemas, bars and cafes bustling with students. Boulevard St-Michel is the area's central meeting point, but equally busy and crowded is the pedestrianized Place Saint Michel and Rue de la Huchette, home to numerous inexpensive bistros. Visitors should not miss the opportunity to visit the Musée de Cluny. The museum is housed in a medieval building and contains a collection of medieval art and craftwork. The district on the right bank of the Seine is dominated by the modern Forum des Halles and Pompidou Centre, which form the meeting point for visitors wishing to explore this area, rich in museums, galleries, shops, markets and restaurants. All the roads around the Halles lead to the Beauborg and the Pompidou Center, an avant-guarde structure of steel girders and pipes, which houses the Musée National d'Art Modern. Street artists constantly perform in the square outside the building. The Ile de la Cité, located nearby, is the nucleus of the old city of Paris. The remains of this ancient location can be admired underneath Notre Dame's courtyard. The various lines, which make up France's railway system, all meet in the centre of Paris, at Chatelet-Les- Halles, the largest metropolitan station in the world. Paris' metropolitan is the best way to travel around the city. The system's 14 lines cover the whole of the Paris area. It is possible to purchase a travelcard which is valid for travel on all forms of public transport. The city's bus service is also efficient and operates from 5:30am to 1am. Those wishing to admire Paris from the water should take a trip on board one of the city's Bateau- Mouches, some of which also offer a restaurant service on board. This boat service operates from May to September, every day from 10am to 8pm, with departures every 45 minutes. The best way to do a city-tour is to travel on one of the double-decker buses operated by Paribus-Les Cars Rouges. The service operates every day from 10 to 8pm with departures every 50 minutes and tour information is provided in French, English and German. [[[Paris - Not to be missed]]] Musée du Louvre, Rue de Rivoli, Metro: Plais Royal-Louvre. A 21 metre high glass pyramid stands at the entrance to the Louvre. The museum is divided into eight sections: Ancient Oriental and Islamic, Ancient Egyptian, Roman-Greek Art, Picture Gallery with ten sub-sections, sculptures and designs. The museum is visited by an enormous number of people anxious to see the museum's three best known masterpieces, the Mona Lisa, Venus di Milo and Samotracia's Nike. The crowds and confusion can be very disturbing, it is advisable to choose a section or historical period and to concentrate exclusively upon it. The following sections are highly recommended: Egyptian, German and late-Gothic painters, Italian Renaissance painters, Flemish and French painters from the 18th Century. Musée d'Orsay on the banks of the Seine, site of an old railway station, houses in its enormous construction of glass and steel, a collection of impressionist and post-impressionist French art, sculptures and paintings from the period 1840 to 1914, furniture, photographs and films. The Déjeuner sur l'herbe and Le balcon by Manet, Moulin de la Galette and Déjeuner des canotiers by Renoir are not to be missed. Notre Dame, Paris' cathedral, is a true Gothic work of art. The building, constructed between 1163 and 1345, can accommodate over 600 people. The three main entrances, each one different, are ornately decorated with statues to attract the attention of the people passing by. The interior is dominated by a spectacular rosary window and an organ with 7,800 pipes. Visitors can climb the north tower of the cathedral's west face to admire the gargoyles and a spectacular view over the city. [[[Paris - Walks and tours]]] A visit to the sumptuous Palace and Gardens of Versailles represents one of the finest trips to be had in the surrounding area of Paris. The palace is easily reached by leaving Paris on the A13 to Rouen and then taking the D182 to Versailles Chateau. If travelling by train, catch the RER, line C to Versailles-Rive Gauche, then continue on to the palace. It was in 1668, on the orders of Louis XIV, that the Louis XIII villa was transformed into the largest palace in Europe. The palace reflects the wishes of the King, who wanted to create a private pavilion in order to meet his lovers in secret. The gardens with their statues and fountains, can be visited on bicycle, which can be rented on site. The gardens house the Grand Canal, site of royal banquets complete with naval battles and the Orangery, a large greenhouse. The State Apartments and the Gallery des Glaces were the site of elegant court celebrations. The building is 75 metres long, 12 metres high with 17 windows and 17 facing mirrors. It is possible to visit other areas of the palace with a guided tour. [[[Paris - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volt, 50 Hertz Climate : Spring is the best time to visit Paris. August is hot and muggy. Opening hours : shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 8pm, Saturday from 9am to 4pm. Post offices are open Monday to Friday from 8am to 7pm. The central post office in Rue de Louvre 52, is open 24 hours a day. The majority of the banks are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 4:30pm. [[[Paris - A pocket guide]]] The main magazines detailing the weekly activities in the city are the Pariscope and the Officiel des Spectacles. The magazines are printed on Wednesdays and detail what's on in Paris. The choice of club and discotheques is extensive and is able to satisfy the musical tastes of everyone. The Music Festival is held the 21st of June, the summer solstice. The Saint Denis Festival runs from June to the end of July, during which time concerts are held in the Saint Denis Basilica. The Chateau of Versailles is the site of the Baroque Music Festival, held from the middle of September to the middle of October. Those zones with the most active night-life area Saint- Germain-des-Prés and the Quartier Latin, Montparnasse, Les Halles and Marais, Montmartre, the Grand Boulevards and the Bastille.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Berlin Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Berlin - Out and About]]] Berlin stands in the middle of the region that has been known since medieval times as the Mark of Brandenburg, and which is now the federal state of Brandenburg, with the River Spree running through the middle of it. After a long slumber lasting fifty years, it is now once again the capital of a unified Germany, and is newly considered to be one of the most important European metropolis. After the Second World War, Berlin was left completely destroyed and demoralised, squeezed in between the East and the West, and divided both physically and metaphorically by a long wall that cut across the city. Today, now that the Cold War and the events of 1989, which ended in the knocking down of the wall, begin to be just far off memories, Berlin is beginning to think about its own future. New buildings, designed by world-famous architects, have sprung up everywhere in this new Berlin, and although a large part of its historical and artistic heritage was destroyed during the last war, the city has kept its cultural identity and great wealth, with its museums and many monuments. However, Berlin is still a city with two souls. The western part has modern, alternative lifestyles, its nightlife is busy and exciting, while the Eastern part is still a kind of trip through what remains of socialism, a living museum made up of state buildings and grey condominium buildings, but with many hidden beauties. Berlin is a huge city and many itineraries can be prepared for visits to its 23 districts. Here we will just list the most interesting sights, most of which are concentrated in a small part of the city and can therefore be reached on foot. To visit the outskirts, we recommend that you use the public transport services that include the subway trains (U-Bahn, which run from 4 am to about midnight), the local trains (S-Bahn, same running times as the U-Bahn), buses and trams (some routes run all night). The heart of Prussian Berlin is called the Mitte, the city’s old town, the symbol of political and imperial military power, and later National Socialist power, which was in the Eastern part of the city before the wall was knocked down. The famous Brandenburg Gate, inspired by the Propileuses from the Athens Acropolis and topped by a statue of the goddess of Victory leading a four-horsed chariot, rises at the end of the huge Avenue known as Unter den Linden. This was the border between East Berlin and West Berlin until the wall fell and is now the symbol of the city. The long, glorious tree-lined avenue Unter den Linden, created in the 18th Century, and its historical buildings were almost completely destroyed during the last war. The buildings on the west side of the avenue which crosses with Friedrichstrasse were replaced with new buildings, while in the eastern part the buildings were restored in their original style. Worthy of note are: the Deutsche Staatsbibliothek, the Humboldt-Universität, the horse monument of Frederick II, the Haus der Gewerkschaften, the Alte Palais. Opposite the university there is the Bebelplatz, the Forum Fridericianus designed by Frederick the Great, a huge architectural complex that includes the Deutsche Staatsoper, St. Hedwigs Kathedrale, the Alte Königliche Bibliothek. Further along we can find the Neue Wache, once the home of the royal guards and now a memorial to the victims of fascism and militarism and the Zeughaus - the arsenal - that was the largest Baroque building in Berlin and which is now the home of the German History Museum. Travelling over the Schlossbrücke, the beautiful bridge with eight marble sections that depict the training and the growth of a Greek warrior, we come to Schlossplatz, home to the Palast der Republik, once the seat of Parliament for the ex-DDR. On the north side of the square is the Berliner Dom, built between the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century in an Italian Neo-Renaissance style. The church’s crypt contains the tombs of the Hohenzollerns. If we continue east we come to the destroyed Alexanderplatz, dedicated to Tsar Alexander I and rebuilt after the bombing raids of the last war. The square contains the TV Tower (Fernsehturm) and the World Time Clock, the clock that shows the time of all the cities of the world. A short distance away is the Marienkirche, the Nikolaikirche and the Rathaus, the red-brick Neo-Renaissance building that is the seat of the city council in Berlin. Going back to the Brandenburg Gate and carrying on towards the River Spree, the route arrives at the Reichstag, the seat of the German Parliament. It was destroyed by a fire in 1933 and then again by bombing in 1945. It was built again after the war, work which continued up to recent years, and it now has a spectacular glass dome. This was the place where, on 2nd October 1990, the reunification of Germany was announced. Further on there is the Schloss Bellevue, built in a Neoclassical style, and the Grosser Stern, a huge square that is also home to the Victory Column (Siegessäule), which lies in the middle of the Tiergarten, a wonderful city park which was once the hunting grounds of the Brandenburg princes. [[[Berlin - Not to be missed]]] The Kultur Forum, located slightly west of the Potsdamer Platz quarter, is an extraordinary group of museums, galleries, libraries and concert halls and is considered to be one of the best cultural centres in Germany. It also includes the Gemäldegalerie, one of the most prestigious art galleries in the country that houses a large collection of paintings by European Masters dating from the 13th to the 18th centuries. The island which is located between two branches of the River Spree, at the eastern end of the Unter den Linden, is called Museuminsel. There is an impressive group of five important museums on it: the Alte Nationalgalerie houses an important collection of pictures and sculptures from the 14th to the 20th centuries. The Alte Museum has collections of classical art and German Masters. The Pergamonmuseum is an exceptional museum of art and antique architecture. The Bodemuseum and the Neues Museum are currently undergoing restoration. To the north west of Ernst-Reuter-Platz, in parkland that runs alongside the river Spree, there is a castle named Charlottenburg. It is the largest and most prestigious castle in the city, built at the end of the 17th century as the summer residence for Queen Sophie Charlotte. A Protector of the arts, the sovereign turned Charlottenburg into a meeting place for intellectuals and musicians. The castle was seriously damaged by bombs during the last war, and was rebuilt by copying photographs, sketches and designs. The interiors too have been returned to their antique splendour, thanks to the restoration of decorations and furniture. [[[Berlin - Walks and tours]]] One of the favourite locations for excursions from Berlin is Potsdam, which lies at 24 km from the capital on the River Havel and which is the capital of the state of Brandenburg. It is known as the “German Versailles”, as the Prussian royal family had splendid castles and parks built there. Sanssouci Castle, a work of art of the German rococo, was built to the west of the city in 1745-47 for Frederick II, according to a project by the same king. The interiors, in rococo style, are filled with frescoes, stucco work, statues, sophisticated furnishings and ornaments. One of the most interesting rooms is the Konzertsaal and the Damenflügel rooms. [[[Berlin - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric suply: 220V, 50Hz. Climate : The annual average temperature in Berlin is about 9°C. In January, which is the coldest month, the average temperature is 1°C, whereas in the hottest month, July, the average temperature is 19°C. The climate is relatively dry, with not much rainfall. Language : German Opening hours : The shops are usually open from Monday to Friday from 9 am to 8 pm, and on Saturdays from 9 am to 4 pm. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 8.30 am to 1 pm and some are also open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3.30 pm to 6 pm. Telephones : To call Germany dial the code 0049 followed by the area code (without the 0) and the number of the person being called. The area code for Berlin is 030 [[[Berlin - A pocket guide]]] Berlin is full of bars, pubs, discotheques, and every type of entertainment. It is one of the liveliest cities in Europe. Berlin wakes up at night, when the others go to sleep. Paradoxically, the ex-West Berlin is less lively than the growing new ex-East Berlin. Here, the best zones are Mitte and above all Prenzlauer Berg, while in the west it is worth visiting the areas of Savignyplatz, Kreuzberg, Nollendorfplatz and Winterfeldtplatz. Berlin also has restaurants to suit all tastes. In addition to the places that serve local food, there are also many ethnic restaurants of all nationalities. In particular there are many Turkish restaurants.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>26</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Cologne Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Cologne - Out and About]]] Cologne, with its one million inhabitants, is the largest city in northern Rhineland. It is situated in Westphalia, in a wonderful landscape of castles, villages and hills, covered with forest and vineyards. The city stands on the banks of the river Reno and some of the best views of the city can be had directly from the river. Cologne is an elegant city, which functions as a show piece for numerous industrial sectors including the perfume industry, which still today makes the famous 'Cologne Water', originally produced in 1709. Thanks to its excellent air, land and water links, the city was already considered the nerve point for transport to the west at the time of the Roman Empire. This is further confirmed by the presence today of 10 European motorways which converge on Cologne's ring-road system. The city's railway station is considered the most important hub in Europe. From the two main airports Cologne/Bonn and Dusseldorf it is possible to reach over 200 destinations around the world. Cologne is also considered the media capital of Germany. In no other place in the Federal German Republic, are there such a large number of activities, directly linked to the world of telecommunication. From an artistic point of view, Cologne offers its visitors a wide choice of attractions. The main monument is the Dom, the geographic and spiritual heart of the city and probably the most famous religious building in Germany. It required 632 years before the construction of this magnificent church, the largest cathedral in Germany, was completed. The foundations were laid in 1248, but following initial rapid progress, work slowed, due to a lack of funds and stopped completely in 1560. It was only thanks to the romantic enthusiasm for the Medieval period expressed by the Prussian Court, that in the 1800's, work restarted and the cathedral was finally able to be inaugurated in 1880. The interior of the cathedral houses some important works, including the Gerone Cross and the King's Shrine, which is said to contain the remains of the Three Wise Men. The gold, jewel-studded sarcophagus was taken to Milan in 1164, as part of the war bounty for the Chancellor of Federico Barbarossa. Other notable features of the cathedral's interior include: the choir stalls and the alter piece featuring the adoration of the Three Wise Men, which dates back to the 15th century. The 509 steps of the west tower of the Dom, Europe's tallest building before the construction of the Eiffel Tower, provides the breathless visitor with spectacular views over the city. Fom here it is possible to observe Peter's Dome, weighing 24 tons and housing the largest bell in the world. Apart from the Dom, the splendour which Cologne acquired during the Medieval period is apparent in its magnificent churches including: Gross St. Martin with its four towers, St.Maria im Kapitol and St. Gerone with its magnificent decagon dome and four floors dating back to the 13th century. The city also bears evidence of its ancient past, when it was a Roman settlement. In the Cathedral Square it is possible to see the archway in the north part of the wall, while a short distance away in Roncalliplatz 4, on the walls of the Romisch-Germanisches Museum, together with two Roman wells, there are the remains of a Roman gate, which leads to the banks of the Reno. The Medieval Town Hall (Rathaus) is noteworthy for its Gothic tower and Renaissance lodge. Here it is also possible to visit the ruins of the ancient Palace of Pretoria. As the majority of Cologne's sights are grouped together in the city centre, it is easy to visit them on foot. Certain of the city's roads, for example Hohe Strasse, Schildergasse and Breite Strasse, are designated pedestrian areas. For travel outside the city it is possible to use the efficient public transport sytems( bus, tram and metropolitan), U- Bahn and S-Bahn, services shared with the local Bonn. [[[Cologne - Not to be missed]]] Cologne is also the sight of important museums. The Romisch-Germanisches museum, situated next to the cathedral in Roncalliplatz, houses a large collection of artefacts taken from along the Reno, including the Funeral Monument of Poblicius (30-40 A.C), the Dioniso Mosaic (III century A.C) and a great number of objects relating to the daily life of the Romans, who inhabited this area. The Wallraf Richartz Museum and the Ludwig Museum, located in a wonderful modern building, house one of the most important picture galleries in Germany and includes works from Rubens, Rembrandt, Durer, Friedrich, Monet, Van Gogh and Renoir, together with various masters who worked in Cologne during the period between the 14th and 16th century. The Ludwig Museum houses a collection of contemporary art featuring works from Rauschenberg and Warhol. The museum complex is open from 10am to 6pm on week-days ( Tuesday until 8pm) and from 11am to 6pm at the week-ends. Visitors should also take a river cruise along the Reno, to admire some of the more unusual angles of the city and its surrounding area. The Koln-Dusseldorfer Rheinschiffahrtsgesellschaften operates the service with four departures daily. [[[Cologne - Walks and tours]]] The town of Bruhl, located 15 km south of Cologne, is the site of the Schloss Augustusburg, one of the most important residential palaces along the Reno. Built on the orders of Clemens Augustus, Prince Elector and Archbishop of Cologne, the building was completed in 1745. A road connects the palace to Falkenlust, a French-style building, used by the Elector as a hunting lodge. Phantasialand is another of the attractions at Bruhl. It was one of the first theme-parks, in Disneyland style, to be built in Europe. The park is open from 1st April to 31st October from 9am to 6pm ( until 9pm in summer). [[[Cologne - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric suply: 220Volts, 50 Hertz Climate : Cologne has a pleasant climate with warm summers, mild winters and an average rainfall of 760mm. The temperature ranges from 1°C in January to 20°C in the summer months Language : German Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm and Saturday mornings from 9am to 1pm. The large supermarkets and shops generally stay open on weekdays from 9am to 8pm and Saturday from 9am to 4pm. Banks are open 8:30/9am to 1/2pm Telephones : The national code for Cologne is 0221. [[[Cologne - A pocket guide]]] Cologne is a city of international fame: a tourist attraction, an important economic centre, not to mention an important site for congresses, fairs, exhibitions and meetings. The city being the centre of attention, has, over the long centuries of its history, developed a particularly sociable atmosphere, evident in the fact that Cologne boasts more than 3,000 bars, restaurants and beer-houses. The highest number pro-capita in all of Germany. The typical beer of Cologne, the Kolsch, must be tried.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>27</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Heidelberg Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Heidelberg - Out and About]]] If a city exists that truly embodies the spirit of Germany, then that city is Heidelberg. The city set on the slopes of the Odenwald, in the state of Baden Wurttemberg, has 140,000 inhabitants. Heidelberg is situated in the heart of the country, on the banks of the river Neckar. Heidelberg has always been an artistic and cultural centre of prime importance, thanks above all to its university, which is over 600 years old and the oldest university in Germany. A romantic city, lived in and loved by such famous poets as Arnim, Brentano,Holderlin, Eichendorff and Goethe. Today Heidelberg, with its splendid and intact medieval centre, is one of the most attractive and visited cities in Germany. The presence of over 20,000 students makes the city a very lively place and serves to keep it young. In addition a busy calendar of cultural activities enriches the already wide variety of city exhibitions. Heidelberg dedicates a large amount of time and space to its theatre and opera productions, but visitors are also warmly welcomed with other fine exhibitions throughout the year including: the Heidelberger Fruehling ( the Heidelberg spring) a festival dedicated to symphony music, the Castle Festival, dedicated to the cinema, the Heidelberger Herbst ( the Heidelberg autumn) an interesting annual market and the not to be missed Christmas Market. Heidelberg has something to offer at all times of the year. The main tourist sight is the Schloss, a castle, one of the finest examples of a Gothic -Renaissance fortress in Germany. The original castle dates back to the 12th century, but the oldest remaining part today, dates back to the 15th century. The building has been throughout the ages both attacked, destroyed and re-built and it is for this reason that today it clearly shows the various phases and different styles of its construction. However it is its laboured past and present day crumbling state that contribute greatly to the castles romantic feel. Visitors can enjoy a spectacular view over the city and the river Neckar from the castle terrace. The castle's cellars are located in the corner of the inner courtyard. The cellars are home to the Grosses Fass, the largest wine cask ever produced. It was constructed in 1751, using the trunks of 130 oaks and it is said that it could contain more than 221,000 litres of wine. Another curiosity of the city is the Deutsches Apothekenmuseum, dedicated to the chemistry and alchemy of the past. The castle is open every day from 9am to 5pm and is easily reached by a rack-railway, which departs from the Kornmarkt station. A visit to the old part of Heidelberg can start at Alte Bruecke, the old bridge with its celebrated monkey statue. The Heiliggeistkirche, the city's most important church, in Gothic style but with a roof in Baroque, is located in Markt, the city's old main square with the Hercules fountain at its centre. The Jesuitenkirche, the one time Jesuit church, dating back to the first decade of the 18th century, is located in Schulgasse, in the Jewish district. The Alte Universitaet, a 17th century building in Baroque style, stands in Universitaetplatz. The Studentenkarzer, a student prison, is situated in Augustinergasse. This building was used between 1779 and 1914 to punish students guilty of punishable crimes or behaviour. Sentences were for a minimum period of three days, during which the students were fed only bread and water. The old part of Heidelberg can easily be visited on foot. In order to visit the modern part of the city it is advisable to use the efficient public transport network (tram and bus) that uses the Bismarck Platz as its focal point. [[[Heidelberg - Not to be missed]]] A long stroll along the Philosophenweg to the north of Neckar is absolutely obligatory in any visit to Heidelberg. The path climbs through steep vineyards and fruit tree plantations and offers magnificent views of the old city and castle. The Kurpfalzisches Museum is very interesting and is housed in a splendid palace built in 1712. It houses a collection which traces the history of the city and its region. Among the objects on display there is the copy of the jaw-bone of the so called Heidelberg Man, an important link in the evolutionary chain, which dates back to almost half a million years ago. The original, with the rest of the skeleton, is housed in the Centre of Paleonthology. Other important attractions include the works of important artists like Durer and Van der Weyden and the Windsheimer Zwoelfbotenaltar, a magnificent altar piece from the 15th century. The museum is located in Hauptstrasse 97 and is open from Monday to Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.). [[[Heidelberg - Walks and tours]]] Excursions and trips in the Neckar Valley are an excellent way of getting to know the countryside which surrounds Heidelberg. Boat trips along the river Neckar are particularly pleasant. These trips are operated by Rhein-Neckar Fahrgastschiffahrt and leave from the city, from the southern bank of the river. The tour passes through old and fascinating villages and reaches such interesting destinations as the Hirschhorn and Neckar Steinach Castles. The four castles of Neckar Steinach were built by four brothers in the 12th century following a family feud. Two of the castles are still inhabited today by descendants of the brothers. [[[Heidelberg - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220Volts, 50 Hertz Climate : Nuremberg has a pleasant climate with warm summers, mild winters and an average rainfall of 700mm. The temperature ranges from 1°C in January to 20°C in the summer months Language : German Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm and Saturday mornings from 9am to 1pm. The large supermarkets and shops generally stay open on weekdays from 9am to 8pm and Saturday from 9am to 4pm. Banks are open 8:30/9am to 1/2pm [[[Heidelberg - A pocket guide]]] The majority of the bars and clubs in Heidelberg are concentrated in an area around the Heiliggeistkirche. The university students generally frequent the bars along Unterestrasse, a road that leaves from Markt and runs parallel to Hauptstrasse. From the start to the end, the road is full of bars, restaurants and pubs ready to satisfy all tastes. During summer the road is literally full of people wishing to spend a pleasant evening. Visitors are recommended to dine at those restaurants serving local cuisine. However Heidelberg also has a wide choice of foreign restaurants.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>28</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Munich Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Munich - Out and About]]] Munich, situated to the north of the Bavarian Alps on the Isar river, is a city that combines a proud provincial feel with the marvel of an international metropolis. This Bavarian capital is an enigmatic mix of ancient wonder and modern elegance. Baroque churches, splendid buildings and beautiful parks stand side by side with art galleries,theatres and elegant shops. The city owes its name to both the many monasteries that have always covered an important role throughout the ages and for having started the production of beer which has made the city universally famous. The city suffered serious damage during the allied bombardment at the end of the Second World War, but the economic success of the years following the war, permitted a vast operation of restoration and reconstruction, which together with Berlin, changed the city into one of the most popular tourist sights in Germany. Munich today is also a internationally important economic centre, particularly active in the automotive, electronic and computer industries. The Oktoberfest bears witness to the famous hospitality and kindness of Munich's inhabitants. This beer festival, held every year, lasts 16 days and attracts over 7 million people. Marienplatz has been, from the moment of the city's construction, the heart of Munich. This is the ideal departure point for a tour of the city. The Mariensaule (Maria Columns) stand in the centre of the square and give the place its name. The columns were erected as a sign of gratitude for the withdrawal of the Swedish troops during the Thirty Year War. Marienplatz is also the site of the Neues Rathaus (Council) built in late Gothic style at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century. The building is particularly interesting for its Glockenspiel, the mechanical clock which functions when the clock chimes 11, 12 and 5 o'clock. The Altes Rathaus ( Old Council), restored after the Second World War, is situated on the east side of the square. There are a number of important churches in close proximity to the square including the Heiliggeistkirche, the largest Gothic church in Munich and the Frauenkirche ( Our Lady's Church), symbolic building of the city, constructed between 1468 and 1488.The church houses the sumptuous St Nepomuk altar and the tomb of the Emperor Ludovic the Bavarian. Michaelskirche, the most impressive Renaissance church in Germany, is situated a short distance away. Maximilianstrasse, the most fashionable street in Munich, is lined with elegant and refined shops. The road comes out in Max-Joseph Platz, site of some important Munich buildings including the Nationaltheater, the Opera and the Residenz. The Residenz was the home of the Wittelsbach a Bavarian family, who lived here from 1385 to 1918. This enormous building was almost completely destroyed during the last war and what remains is the result of the latest reconstruction. The interiors and the works of art are however original and include a noteable collection of jewellery from the Bavarian Crown, conserved in the Schatzkammer, together with a spectacular collection of crowns, tiaras, clocks and other precious objects. Other interesting rooms within the building include the Ancestor's gallery with 121 potraits of the bavarian sovereigns, the Schlachtensale (Balle Room), the Porcelain Room, with services from the Meissen, Berlin and Nynphenburg factories and the Asiatic collections of Chinese and Japanese art. It is possible to visit The Residenz, following a guided tour, which is divided into two sessions, each of two hours duration. The building is open from Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 4:30 pm. A separate ticket is required in order to view the Schatzkammer. It is also possible to visit the sumptuously decorated Altes Residenztheater, perhaps the finest Rococo theatre in Europe. The Konigsplatz, situated to the north-east of the city, is dominated by Propylaen, a neo-Classic symbol of the bond between Bavaria and Greece, during the time of the Greek fight for independence against Turkey. The Konigplatz is the site of two museums which house the Wittelsbach and Glyptothek art collections, which include important Greek and Roman sculptures and the Antikensammlungen, which houses a precious collection of ancient artefacts. The museums are open from Tuesday to Friday from 10am to 5pm. The majority of the city can be visited on foot, with large areas of the centre being designated pedestrian zones. For destinations further a field, it is recommended to use the efficient public transport system operated by Munchener Verkehrs-und Tarifverbund GmbH (MVV). The system comprises 20 tram lines, 83 bus routes, 7 metropolitan lines U-Bahn and 10 rail lines S-Bahn. The area covered by this service is divided into zones. The system operates from 5am to 1am every day. [[[Munich - Not to be missed]]] The Munich Alte Pinakotek, which houses the Wittelsbach art collection, collected over the duration of the family's reign, is one of the most extraordinary museum in the world. The building, constructed specifically as an art gallery for Ludovic I by the architect Leo Klenze, houses works of art which cover a period of over 400 years. Some of the most important works include 'Madonna with carnation' by Leonardo, the 'Pieta' by Botticelli, together with works by Raffaello, Filippo Lippi, Van Dyck, Rembrandt and Rubens.. In addition the art gallery boasts the largest collection in the world of the works of art from the masters of the German school. The gallery, situated in Barer Strasse N°7, is open from Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm. The Neue Pinakotek, situated in front of the Alte Pinakotek, houses an excellent collection of paintings from the 19th and 20th century including works by David, Gainsborough, Goya, Turner, Monet, Manet, Cezanne, Gaugin, Van Gogh, Schiele and Klimt. The opening times are the same as those of the Alte Pinakotek. The Tuscan style villa of the German portrait artist Franz Von Lenbach (1839-1904) was sold by his widow to the city of Monaco and now houses the Stadtische Gallery, a wonderful collection of works of art from the Munich masters and German artists from the 19th century. The section dedicated to the Blaue Reiter movement, is of particular interest and includes works by Marc, Kandinsky, Klee and Macke. The Deutches Museum, one of the finest science and technology museums in the world, is also worth a visit. The museum, with its eight floors, houses various displays including automotive, railway,aeronautic, physics and telecommunication sections. The museum is situated in Museumsinsel 1 and is open every day from 9am to 5pm [[[Munich - Walks and tours]]] Dachau, the one time concentration camp, is situated just outside Munich and is easily reached by public transport. A visit is obligatory even if highly disturbing from a emotive point of view. Dachau, built by Hitler in 1933, was the first Nazi concentration camp and whilst in operation imprisoned 200,000 prisoners of which 30,000 were put to death. The complex comprises a central building, which houses a museum and a reconstruction the barrack huts, bunker, crematorium oven and gas chamber. The site is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9am to 5pm. [[[Munich - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volts, 50 Hertz Climate : the Munich summers are generally warm and sunny, but frequent rainfalls are present. The temperatures vary from 11°C to 23°C. In winter the temperatures vary from to -3°C to 5°C Language : German Opening hours : Shops are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 6pm and Saturday from 9am to 2pm. Some shops are open late on Thursday until 8pm or 9pm and the first Saturday of each month until 6pm. Banks are open from 8:30am to 12:30pm and from 1:30pm until 3:30 pm Monday to Friday. Telephones : The code for Munich is 089. [[[Munich - A pocket guide]]] Munich night-life is rich and varied. The residents consider a good beer a fundamental part of the city social life; for this reason the bars, beer houses and cafés are always welcoming and stay open until the early hours of the morning. The largest concentration of pubs is around the Schwabing district, the lively university zone to the north of the centre and Haudhausen, on the right bank of the river Isar. The best place to sample the famous Bavarian beer is in one of the many open-air beer houses.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Nuremberg Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Nuremberg - Out and About]]] Nuremberg, with its 500,000 inhabitants, is the second largest city in Bavaria and the main centre of Franken, a region of splendid parks and hills covered with vineyards. Although the old part of the city was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War, Nuremberg managed to maintain the character of the city, during its reconstruction. Nuremberg combines the liveliness of a modern city with the fascination of an old medieval town. In the old city, beautiful Gothic churches, rows of old wooden houses and tranquil cobbled square , create a unique atmosphere, seen every year by thousands of tourists. Nuremberg sadly became famous during the Nazi period, due to the enormous mass rallies held here and for having given its name to the antisemite laws, passed by the Third Reich, for whom the city became a sort of symbolic capital. After the end of the war the city was chosen as the sight to hold the trials ( referred to as The Nuremberg Trials) against the Nazi war criminals. The city, following the war, was rebuilt with the Altstadt ( Old Town) being constructed almost entirely using the original stones and bricks, in such a way as to faithfully reproduce the original aspect of the city. The artistic treasures, housed in the churches, were taken and conserved in hiding places by the nazis and therefore escaped damage from the bombardments and are today in perfect condition. The main sights of interest are almost all located within the Altstadt, the old part of the city, enclosed within the reconstructed city wall and surrounded by a dry moat. Altstadt, with the waters of the river Pegnitz flowing through it, has a relaxing and pleasant atmosphere. The majority of the centre is pedestrianized, thus maintaining the chaos of the city outside the fortification. The image of the centre is not all medieval, there are also large areas of modern architecture, which blends in, creating a harmonious mix of old and new. A visit of the city can begin at Kaiserburg, which is reached following a steep climb up the Burgstrasse. Theatre of many Imperial assemblies, during the period from the 11th to the 16th century, this castle was considered the 'coffers' of the German empire and, in spite of numerous modifications and damage caused during the wars, it still stands as an interesting silhouette against the Nuremberg skyline. Tiergartnerplatz is located nearby and is the site of Albrecht Durer Haus: the house where, at the beginning of the 15th century, the great artist lived. The interesting Spielzeugmuseum is located in Karlstrasse and houses a collection of toys from every era. The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm Haptmarkt is the commercial centre of the ancient city, site of the famous Christmas market (Christkindlmarkt) and the location of the elaborate Gothic church Frauenkirche. The church's facade comprises the clockwork mechanism designed by Mannleinlaufen. At mid-day every day the clock strikes and seven statues of princes dance around Charles IV, accompanied by the music of a glockenspiel. The square is also the site of the Goldener Brunnen, a splendid fountain built in 1396. The Alte Rathaus and the 12th century St. Sebaldus church, the oldest church in the city, are located a short distance from Haptmarkt. The Germanisches Nationalmuseum, situated in Kartausergasse, is an important museum dedicated to the German culture. The museum houses collections of German sculptures, archaeology, weapons and scientific and musical instruments. The museum is open from 10 to 5, Tuesday to Sunday ( Wednesday until 9pm) Handwerkerhof, the medieval reconstruction of the city's craftsmen's district, is situated in the south-west of the city, where it is possible to purchase interesting items. Given that the majority of the city sights are located in the centre and the centre is a cobbled pedestrianized zone, it is very easy to visit them on foot. For destinations further afield, there is the efficient public transport system VGN. [[[Nuremberg - Not to be missed]]] The rallies of the National Socialist party, which took part in Nuremberg, were organised to obtain maximum support for the party. Already by 1933, these rallies had reached such large proportions, that it was necessary to design a large complex on the city outskirts in order to accommodate the mass of participants. This complex referred to as Luitpoldhain, is the place where even today, stand some of the building constructed during that regime. The site now serves as a memory to the victims of the regime. The Luitpoldarena, is located near the north entrance of the park, easily reached by the number 9 tram or 36 bus. Luipolarena is the site where the SS and the SA, held their parades. At one time this was also the site of the building where the Nazi party held their congresses, but it was raised to the ground during the 1945 bombardment. The Kongressbau is however still standing and serves as one of the most shocking examples of the arrogance of this regime. Constructed in Neoclassic style, it represents a modern and renewed Colosseum. The Grosse Strasse, situated behind this building, leads to the Marzfeld, a large field used for military parades. Its dimensions are enormous, 2km in length and 60 metres wide. Today part of the field has been converted into a car park. Returning to Kongressbau, the visitor passes the Stadion, one time used for Hitler Youth meetings and today returned to its initial use that of a sports field. The Zeppelinfeld, transformed by Albert Speer, an architect of the regime into a stadium for the more important parades, stands a little further to the north. Behind this stadium, in the museum, it is possible to watch a documentary about Nuremberg and the Third Reich, entitled Fascinazion und Gewalt ( Fascination and Strength). [[[Nuremberg - Walks and tours]]] A visit to Nuremberg can be combined with visits to some of the surrounding towns, situated not far from the city, such as Erlangen, Bamberg and Bayreuth. Bamberg is particularly interesting for the atmosphere of its old town centre and for the fascinating variety of styles of its buildings. The main monuments include: 1. The Roman Gothic Dom, with its spectacular decorative sculptures 2. The picturesque Altes Rathaus, the old town hall, which stands on two twin bridges in the middle of the river Regnitz 3. The Neue Residenz, imposing residence of the Archbishop 4. St. Michael Baroque Church. The fame of Bayreuth is due to the annual festival, which sees thousands of admirers of the music of the German composer Richard Wagner, flock to the town. The festival takes place in Festpielhaus, a room constructed specifically for the composer, for his operas. It is situated on a hill to the north of the city. Festpielhaus was inaugurated in 1876, with a complete presentation of the opera Ring and which today hosts exclusively the works of Wagner. [[[Nuremberg - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric suply: 220Volts, 50 Hertz Climate : Nuremberg has a pleasant climate with warm summers, mild winters and an average rainfall of 700mm. The temperature ranges from 1°C in January to 20°C in the summer months Language : German Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm and Saturday mornings from 9am to 1pm. The large supermarkets and shops generally stay open on weekdays from 9am to 8pm and Saturday from 9am to 4pm. Banks are open 8:30/9am to 1/2pm Telephones : To call Germany dial the number 0049 followed by the area code without the initial zero and the private number. The national code for Nuremberg is 0911 [[[Nuremberg - A pocket guide]]] Nuremberg does not lack in possibilities to pleasantly end a day's touring of the city. There are numerous restaurants which offer typical Franken dishes including bratwurst, to sample perhaps with a fine German beer. The city also has fine foreign restaurants, in particular Italian, and a vast choice of bar and beer houses.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Athens Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Athens - Out and About]]] Athens is the indisputable cradle of western civilization. The homeland of art, science, philosophy and law. This Greek capital, with its 4 million inhabitants is one of the largest cities in the Mediterranean basin. About 40% of the entire population live here. The Athens of today is a crowded congested city with a high level of pollution, a city in which the old and the new have failed to harmoniously combine together, where the city's ancient monuments are swallowed up by a huge expanse of concrete and metal, signs of the indiscriminate city planning of the 20th century. However, in spite of this Athens is still a city worth exploring, a city of Mediterranean warmth and a crossroads and meeting point for western and oriental cultures. The main reason for a trip to Athens is a visit to the Acropolis, the heart of Athens and sanctuary of European civilization. It is also one of the most important archaeological sites in the western world.. Having passed the Propylaea, the impressive entrance to the Acropolis, the visitor arrives at the Parthenon, the most important Dorian temple ever built in Greece. The temple is built entirely from marble and was originally colourfully painted and decorated with a giant statue of the Goddess Athena, sculptured by Phidias. The statue was transferred to Byzantium, before being destroyed in 1023 during the siege on the city by the Crusaders. Eretteo, which stands next to the Parthenon, is an elegant temple enriched by the celebrated Cariatides portico, so called, because of the six statues of maidens who are holding up the temple's architrave. The statues have been replaced and the originals are to be found in the Mussio Akropolis. This museum houses the sculptures and finds from the architectural sites around the Acropolis. The re-constructed Athena Nike Temple is situated in front of the Propylaea entrance. The Dioniso Theatre stands on the south-east slopes of the Acropolis, originally constructed in wood, the theatre has perfect acoustics and is the site, where in 5th century B.C the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Aristophanes were performed. The theatre was re-constructed in marble and stone by Lycurgus between 342 and 326 B.C. The seating capacity is 17,000 of which 20 rows have remained intact. Other interesting monuments include the Esculaio Sancturay, the Eumene Portico and the Herod Attico Odeon. Agora was the public square and the social, political and administrative heart of the city. Interesting things to note in this area include the re-constructed Attalo Stoa ( Portico), originally built between 159 and 138 B.C and which today houses the Agora Museum. The Efesto Temple, situated on the west side of the Agora, dates back to 449 B.C and is the best preserved Dorian temple in Geece. To the north of the temple lie the foundations of the Stoàr of Zeus Eleutios, one of the places where Socrates addressed the people of Athens. The Apostle Saints Church, built in the 11th century to commemorate the preaching of Saint Paul, is decorated with Byzantine frescoes and is situated at the entrance to the Agora. The Plaka district on the north side of he Acropolis, was the heart of old Athens, prior to its modern expansion. the area has an oriental feel mixed with a Byzantine aroma, which is felt strolling along the narrow streets, squares, and terraces.S ome of the main monuments of this zone include the Mikri Mitropoli, Byzantine Church, dating back to the 12th Century, the Tower of Winds ( Aerides) the Lisicrate Monument, Adrian's Gate and the Temple of Zeus Olympus. The Licabetto Hill is 277 metres high and was once covered with a thick wood, populated by wolves. Today it is the best sight from which to admire a view over the city. The summit is also the site of the Agios Giorgios Church, where at Easter, the main religious festival for the Greek Orthodox Church, a candlelight procession is organized, a symbol of the Resurrection of Christ. The summit is easily reached by cable-car. The metropolitan is very new, comfortable and efficient. Given the traffic chaos in the city, it is not advisable to use buses or taxis. [[[Athens - Not to be missed]]] The National Archaeological Museum is one of the richest in the world and houses works of art from the Neolithic to the Roman period. The exhibits come from sites around Greece with the exceptions of Delphi, Olympia and Crete. Founded in 1834, the museum houses, on the first floor, the sculpture exhibition and on the first floor the pottery and frescoes taken from Santorini. Visitors should not miss the Micenea Room collection, the frescoes in the Cycladesca room and the bronze statue of Poseidon, rediscovered in 1928 off the coast of Cape Artemisio on the island of Eubea. The Micenea Room houses the Schliemann finds from the tomb of Micene, including the gold mask of Agamemnon. The museum is open Monday from 12:30 to 7pm and from Tuesday to Sunday from 8am to 7pm. The Cycladesca Museum of Art is an extraordinary collection of ancient art and contains idols from the Cyclades islands, some of which date back to 3,000 B.C Athens is home to numerous interesting museums including the Benaki Museum, the Byzantine Museum and the National History Museum. [[[Athens - Walks and tours]]] The Poseidon( God of the sea) Temple, is situated on the wind-swept site of Cape Sunion near the Aegean Sea, 67 km from Athens. The temple was built between 444 and 440 B.C for Perikles on the site of a previous sanctuary, dating back to the 6th century B.C, destroyed during the Persian War. Damaged by weather and attacks, the building was restored at the beginning of the 19th century. At the same time two colossal statues were removed and relocated in the Archaeological Museum in Athens. The 16 slim white columns that remain still standing today, serve as a reference point for ships heading to Piraeus. From the steps of the temple it is possible to enjoy fine views of the sea, the islands and the Saronico Gulf. [[[Athens - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 volts Climate : the climate is typically Mediterranean , mild and temperate throughout the year. Summer begins mid May with average temperatures of 28°C with highs of 40°C. The season is very dry and the droughts can continue until October, aggravated by the lack of wind typical in the Aegean. Winters are mild with abundant rainfall. The average temperature rarely falls below 10°C Language : Greek Opening hours : shops are generally open from Monday to Wednesday from 9 to 2:30 pm Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9am to 1:30 pm and from 5:30pm to 8:30 pm and Saturday from 9am to 3pm. Banks are open from Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Telephones : the international code for Greece is 0030 [[[Athens - A pocket guide]]] Athens is a city that lives an intense night-life, especially during the summer months, when the streets swarm with people. The Glyfada and Kifissia districts are those preferred by the residents of Athens. When choosing a restaurant it is important to remember that the 'Estitorion' are the most expensive, the 'tavernas' are more informal family run restaurants, the 'psistaria' sell mainly grilled meat and the 'psarotaverna' specialize in fish dishes</testo> 
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 <titolo>Cork Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Cork - Out and About]]] The county of Cork, possibly Ireland’s mildest region, owing to the beneficial influence of the Atlantic current, is considered one of the most spectacular areas on the island. Cork, the county town, stands at the mouth of the river Lee, set deep into the Cork Harbour inlet. The city was built initially on a river island, around an ancient monastery from 650 d.c. Cork is a city of quays and bridges, that run alongside and span the river Lee. The city’s hills and glades are interrupted by wharfs and gangways. Its windy streets, which were once canals, still possess the bollards used to moor the merchant ships. These bollards are easily visible lining both sides of St Patrick’s street, which today is the city’s main shopping area. Visitors can admire the Victorian buildings, dating back to 19th century which line Grand Parade to St Patrick’s Street. This elegant road, stands alongside one of the tributaries of the Lee and forms the heart of the city of Cork. It is the site of the market and Bishop Lucey Park, which houses what remains of the ancient city walls. The south end of the street is closed by a national monument, erected in honour of Irish patriots of the period 1798-1867. This zone is also the site of picturesque houses with 18th century façades and narrow streets, which allow glimpses of the surrounding glades and clearings. At the extreme north of St Patrick’s Street, the river is spanned by the three arches of St Patrick’s Bridge, built in 1861 and one of Cork’s most beautiful bridges. Fitzgerald’s Park in Western Road, situated on the east fork of the river Lee, is the preferred destination for Dubliner’s wishing to take a leisurely stroll. The park grounds house a small café, the Tea house, sports fields and the Georgian house,which is home to the Cork Public Museum, where it is possible to obtain an in-depth knowledge of the history of the city up to the beginning on the 20th century. The end of the park, which stands on the banks of the river and has access in Western Road and Donovan’s Road , is the site of the University College York. The building, constructed in 1849, is in Tudor style, evident above all in the University’s central courtyard. A fine collection of Ogham Stones are on display in the corridors of the north-wing building, which looks onto Western Road. The Department of Plant Science is located to the left of the Boole Library entrance. The Homan Chapel is well worth a visit, This small chapel built in 1915 possesses stained- glass windows featuring Celtic designs. The Cork City Market, open in 1789, stands between Grand Parade and St. Patrick’s Street. The British architecture is reflected in the arches, galleries and fountains. The fishmonger stalls are particularly interesting. Cork’s most famous church is the Shandon Steeple,which stands on a hill to the north of the river. The steeple’s eight bells can be rung by visitors. The ancient butter market built in 1770, and site of extraordinary trade and commerce with Spain, Germany and the West Indies, is located near to the steeple. St. Finnbarr’s Cathedral is located in Dean Street. The cathedral, built in gothic style and one of the most important monastic schools, has marble interior and a wonderful rose window in its façade. The Tourist Office, in Grand Parade, provides information on the Cork Tourist Trail, a route around the city, which permits the visitor to take in the city sights. Cork is a city of modest dimensions and can be easily visited on foot. The city bus service is operated by Bus Eireann. For information on bus routes and timetables, visitors should contact the office in Parnell Place (Tel.21 508188). [[[Cork - Not to be missed]]] The court House in Washington Street, built in 1834, has an ornate front complete with Corinthian columns. The Crawford Art gallery, built in 1724, is located in Emmet place and houses a collection of sculptures and paintings of modern and ancient Irish artists. The City Hall(1936) stands on the banks of the river Lee and its architecture blends well with the other elegant buildings in the vicinity. The Triskel Arts Centre, in Tobin Street, is open Tuesday to Saturday from 11am to 5pm and houses temporary exhibitions and theatrical productions. [[[Cork - Walks and tours]]] Blarney Castle, the fortress of Cormac Mccarthy, built in 1446, is located 9km to the north-west. Of Cork. Some of the paths, which lead from the castle, take the visitor through the surrounding park and superb Rocklose Gardens, home to traces of an old Druid temple. The castle is open in the summer from 9am to 5.30pm. The trail, which leaves Cork and crosses the hills in a south westerly direction to the coast, is highly interesting and leads the visitor to Baltimore, where it is possible to catch a boat to Cape Clear and the Sherkin Isles. The pretty fishing village of Bantry is located 90km west of Cork and is the site of Bantry House, a residence built in 1740 complete with Italian garden, statues and terrace. Travelling south west, it is possible to visit Kinsale, with its beautiful 18th century buildings, picturesque port, fishing fleet and Charles Fort. Summer Cove bay offers splendid views of the port and fort. [[[Cork - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: the supply is standard 220volts A.C. An adaptor may be necessary. Climate : temperate Language : Irish, English Opening hours : shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 5:30/6pm [[[Cork - A pocket guide]]] Cork is renown for its artists, musicians and writers. The city has an intensive cultural programme, which can be sampled through its many festivals, held throughout the year, including: the international festivals of cinema, jazz, folk-dance and choral music. Students can enjoy Cork’s active night-life with the city’s numerous theatres, restaurants, pubs and discotheques.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Dublin Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Dublin - Out and About]]] The capital city of the Republic of Ireland is marvellously positioned on the eastern coast of the island. The city lies at the mouth of the river Liffey, at the inner-most part of Dublin Bay, situated between the Howth and Dalkey Peninsulas. Dublin, built around a 12th century Anglo-Norman castle, spreads out in a semi-circular pattern from both banks of the river Liffey. The urban area of the city, with its elegant houses, is centred around the historic centre of Dublin, south of the river, while the industrialised part of Dublin is to be found to the north of the river, with the city port and docks situated to the east. The structure of the city dates back to the 18th century, a period which has left its mark on Dublin, with such elegant Georgian constructions as: Merrion Square, number 29 Fitzwilliam Street, the Customs House, the street and bridge in O’Connell Street, the Dublin Writer’s Museum, Parnell Square, the Whiskey Museum, the Four Courts and the James’ Joyce Cultural Centre, located along Dame Street. The city’s main traffic point is O’Connell Bridge, which spans the Liffey, between O’Connell Street ( site of the statue of Joyce and the General Post Office) and the Trinity College library, built in 1592. The three main churches are Christ Church; St. Patrick Cathedral, which houses the tomb of Swift and St. Audoen’s Church, whose gardens house traces of Dublin’s ancient city walls. Temple Bar is the city’s liveliest and most artistic zone. It is located between Trinity Church and Christ Church, where craft shops, quality restaurants and cinema libraries stand on the city’s old 17th century foundations. Beer- lovers should visit the Guinness Hop Store, a brewery founded in 1759 by Arthur Guinness, while music lovers should head for the Irish Music Hall of Fame. Dublin is home to the largest city park in Europe; the Phoenix Park is home to a zoo and hippodrome and offers the visitor numerous possibilities to stroll around the park grounds. Dublin can be easily and comfortably visited on foot, with tours taking in historical, literary and musical points of interest,not to mention numerous lively pubs. The Tourist Office in Suffolk Street provides leaflets on the Dublin Tourist Trail, which details the main sights to see. The traffic in Dublin is always very heavy and finding a parking space is a real task. Unless long and intensive travel is programmed, visitors are recommended to travel around the city by bicycle or on foot. The city’s metropolitan system, the DART ( Dublin Area Rapid Transport) operates a efficient and regular service from 6:30am to 12:00pm Monday to Saturday and 9:30 am to 11:00pm on Sundays. The fare varies depending on the route. The bus service, operated by Atha Cliath (Dublin Bus) runs from 6:00am to 11:30pm. In addition to this service there is also a late night bus (Nitelinks). The bus fare depends on the number of stops. Dublin’s taxis are comfortable and can be either hailed in the street or booked by telephone. However taxis are expensive and during rush hour it is often necessary to wait. [[[Dublin - Not to be missed]]] The National Gallery in Merrion Square West, near to Leinster House, houses European art collections together with works from all the major Irish artists. The National Museum in Kildare is a history museum that conserves gold jewellery dating back to the Bronze Age, Celtic crosses and a fine collection of musical instruments. The Trinity College Library, located between Nassau Street and Pearse Street, is accessible via College Street. Originally established by Queen Elizabeth I in 1592, to provide teaching and study possibilities to the local aristocracy, the building today, houses Ireland’s largest library. It is composed of eight buildings, with a 70 metre long reading gallery. Within its walls, famous writers such as Swift,Wilde and Beckett, graduated. Visitors should also see the Campus and the Old Library, which houses the “Book of Kells” an illuminated early Gaelic Christian gospel. The “Book of Kells” is regarded as one of the world’s finest incunabulum and each day two of its 680 pages are on show to the public. [[[Dublin - Walks and tours]]] Newgrange is situated in Drogheda, 50km north of Dublin. This prehistoric site houses enormous burial chambers dating back to over 5,000 years. Pale, situated 10 km south west of the Newgrange necropolis, is the symbolic centre of Gaelic Ireland. The sacred Tara Hill, once capital of the Ard-Ris (the Great King of Ireland) was used as the King’s coronation site. The ruins of the oldest monastery in Ireland are a short distance away from Drogheda, at Monasterboice, where it is possible to admire both the carved stone figures, which evoke episodes from biblical history and to see one of the finest examples of a Celtic Cross. Wicklow, Wexford and Waterford, lie on the east coast to the south of Dublin. Wicklow is 50km from the city and is immersed in the wild region of the Wicklow Mountains. The road, which crosses the mountains connecting Dublin to Glendalough, is very picturesque and worth a visit. Travelling along the road near Enniskerry, it is possible to visit Powerscourt House, a splendid 18th century residence. The grounds, which can be visited only in summer, house wonderful gardens and a 120 metre waterfall. One of the most strikingly beautiful panoramas, is that of the Glendalough Valley. Set between two lakes in the heart of the range, it is possible to view the ruins of Glendalough Monastery. [[[Dublin - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: The standard supply is 220 volts. An adaptor may be necessary. Climate : The climate suffers from ocean influences. Strong winds, ample rainfall throughout the year and dense fogs. In summer the temperature rarely exceeds 16°C. Language : Irish, English Opening hours : shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 9am to 5:30/6pm.Banks are open weekdays from 10am to 12:30 and from1:30pm to 3pm. [[[Dublin - A pocket guide]]] The magazine “In Dublin“, provides detailed information about what is happening in the city. Dublin is an incredible mix of pubs and socio-cultural places of interest.. It was not by chance that the city was chosen by many poets and writers as the ideal place to spend their time. Welcoming, traditional and at the same time transgressive, Dublin can be savoured at numerous sites around the city including: Foggy Dew, Pravda, the Front Lounge, the Globe, the Long Hall, the Norseman and the O’Doneghue.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Galway Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Galway - Out and About]]] Galway is the liveliest and most populated city on Ireland’s west coast. Galway is the County Town of Western Ireland, the administrative capital of the county of Galway and the main religious centre of Connach. Galway, situated on the Atlantic, has a marvellous setting. It lies on the banks of the river Corrib and is in part medieval and in part 15th century. The city streets are narrow and lined with old stone façade shops. Galways pubs are swarming with adventurers, musicians, artists and intellectuals, thanks above all to University College Galway, one of the main centres for the promotion of the Gaelic language. The city centre is compact and spreads along both banks of the river Corrib. The zone to the east of the river, contains Galway’s main shopping area. Eyre Square, the heart of the city, has maintained its medieval appeal and today houses numerous cafés and quality shops. Eyre Square is the site of the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial Park, built in honour of the President’s visit in 1963, when he was made an honorary citizen of Galway.The Collegiate Church of St Myra is located in Market Street. The church ,with its unusual pyramidal spire, dates back to 1320 and is the largest parish church in Ireland. The church houses some particularly interesting tombs. The colourful open-air Fowl and Butter Market, takes place every Saturday morning in the square in front of the church. There are many fine stone buildings in Galway including Lynch’s Castle in Market Street, a part of which dates back to the 14th century and the Spanish Arch, all that remains of the ancient city wall. Galway is a city of relatively small dimensions and is very easy to visit on foot. The bus service, operated by Bus Eireann, is very efficient and serves both the city centre and the out-lying residential areas. Bus stops are located throughout the city. The main bus and train stations are situated in the same building, located in Eyre Square. The main taxi ranks are located in front of this building. [[[Galway - Not to be missed]]] University College is situated in University Road. The building in Tudor style, dates back to 1849 and is set in pretty, carefully maintained gardens. The university houses a Unesco section, set up to study the Celtic culture and language. Courses in Gaelic are regularly held every summer. Galway City museum, the regional museum, is in Spanish Arch and houses displays about the history of the city. The museum, open Monday to Friday from 10am to 5pm, has a terrace from where the visitor can admire the port of Galway. [[[Galway - Walks and tours]]] Galway introduces the visitor to the west of Ireland and to the large expanse of land known as Connemara. The County of Galway stretches from Ballinasole in the central counties, crosses Connemara and arrives at the craggy Atlantic coast of Clifden. This splendid landscape includes sheer coastal cliffs, the mountainous region of the Twelve Pins to the east, beaches, waterfalls, peat bogs and nature in its purest state. Clifden is the departure point for a bicycle tour across this varied land. The cyclist passes through barren and arid peat bogs dotted with lakes, among fields ringed with stone –walls, where the people, proud of their roots, still speak their ancient Gaelic language. A boat service connects Galway to Inishmore and the Isles of Aran, situated at the mouth of the Gulf of Galway. Inishmore, Inishmaan and Inisheer, are among the most evocative and wild regions in Europe. A two hour bicycle tour of Inishmore, the largest of the three islands, allows the visitor the possibility of seeing Dun Aengus. This prehistoric fort, perched on a cliff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, is the largest prehistoric stone fort in Ireland. The fort, surrounded by three enormous dry stone walls, is situated about 900metres from the information centre and is reached by means of an uphill path [[[Galway - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: the standard electricity supply is 220 volts A.C. An adaptor may be necessary. Climate: the temperature rarely drops below freezing in winter and rarely exceeds 25°C in summer. Rainfalls are frequent. May and June are the sunniest months. Climate : the temperature rarely drops below freezing in winter and rarely exceeds 25°C in summer. Rainfalls are frequent. May and June are the sunniest months. Language : English, Gaelic Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30/6pm. The post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30pm. The banks are open from 10am to 12:30 pm and from 1:30pm to 3pm. [[[Galway - A pocket guide]]] Galway is a lively city in winter and a popular tourist destination in summer, thanks to its combination of sea and night-life. Galway’s artistic and theatrical culture is very evident, there are traditional pubs with live music to suit all tastes, fine restaurants and a rich calendar of festivals and events: The Arts Festival in July, the A.T Cross Literature Festival in April, the Galway Races in July and the Galway Oyster Festival in September. Galway offers many possibilities for sports enthusiasts: golf, fishing, horse-riding, tennis and badminton.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Florence Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Florence - Out and About]]] Florence is the capital city of both the Florence Province and the region of Tuscany. It is situated 50 metres above sea level and stands on both banks of the river Arno. To the north and north-east the city stretches along the foothills of the Careggi, Fiesole and Settignano hills, to the south along the Arcetri and Bellosguardo Hills. Florence dates back to the Pre-.Roman age, has a regular urban layout and spans the river with numerous, architecturally splendid bridges. The artistic and cultural heritage of Florence is among the greatest in the world. Its academies, libraries and museums are renown. Its religious monuments, churches, civil architecture and buildings are exceptional. All the tourist attractions are grouped together in four zones, all of which can be easily visited on foot. The geographical and historical fulcrum of Florence is recognised as those parts which contains the city's Duomo, the Santa Croce district,the north zone of San Lorenzo and San Marco, the zone running from the Santa Maria Novella train station to the west to the Piazza della Repubblica, Ponte Vecchio, Mercato Nuovo and in the district of Oltrarno with the Pitti Place, Santo Spirito, the Boboli Gardens and the Santa Maria del Carmine Church. The eastern zone of the city maintains its Medieval atmosphere, with its hive of narrow streets and ancient alleyways. The Santa Maria del Fiore or Duomo, with its baptistery designed by Ghiberti and its bell-tower designed by Giotto, dominates this area. The Orsanmichele, one of the finest examples of 13th century architecture in the city, is located in Via Calzaiuoli. The Bargello Gallery is situated in via del Proconsolo. The gallery houses a collection of Florentine Renaissance sculptures, with works from Michelangelo, Donatello and Cellini. The magnificent Gothic Santa Croce Basilica,in the Santa Croce Piazza, is a collection of monastic buildings grouped around cloisters, forming what is today a museum of paintings and religious sculptures. The basilica houses tombs and cenotaphs by Galileo and Michelangelo, the crucifixions by Donatello and Cimabue, the Pazzi Chapel by Brunelleschi and the Bardi Chapel, with Giotto frescoes. The Piazza della Signoria was both the centre of political power and city life until the era of the city council. This large and sunny square is dominated by the imposing Palazzo Vecchio, which forms the back drop to the Signoria open arched gallery, one of the most important Medieval buildings in Italy. The Medici zone winds it way along via de Martelli, one of the city's main streets, which starts at the passage between the Duomo and the Baptistery. The zone is the site of the San Lorenzo Basilica, which houses the mortal remains of some of the most illustrious Medici family members. The Palazzo Medici Ricccardi, the family's main residence, is situated a short distance away. The roads situated around Piazza San Lorenzo, are bustling with a large and colourful market, which includes the central market, a two-storey building selling fresh food.The zone ,which at the time of the Medici, housed the Granduke's stables, is now the San Marco district, with its Convent. This district has a young feel , owing to the large presence of students from the University, Conservatory and the Academy of Fine Arts. The block of buildings that begin on the corner of via Ricasoli, is the site of the Academy's Gallery, the Gem Factory and the Archaeology Museum. The city is bordered in the west by the railway station and Ponte Vecchio. The bridge houses numerous antique and modern jewellery shops. The Piazza della Repubblica, one of the liveliest zones of Florence, is situated a short distance away.This zone is renown for its cafes and shopping area which includes via Vigna Nuova and via de Tornabuoni, both highly elegant, lined with refined shops and important buildings from the 15th to the 18th century. The Palazzo Strozzi is an example of the zone's fine buildings, built in Florentine Renaissance style, it is the seat of numerous cultural institutions, including Gabinetto G.P. Visseux. Oltrarno, is a tranquil zone of low buildings, antique shops and work-shops. The area is dominated by the Palazzo Pitti and the intricately shaped hedges of the Boboli Gardens. The zone is the site of Via Maggio and the Piazza di Santo Spirito, both lined by aristocratic buildings. The Santa Maria del Carmine, situated in the Piazza del Carmine,is famous for its frescoes in the Bancacci Chapel, painted by Masolino and Masaccio. Ecologically friendly buses run from Santa Maria Novella Central Station to the centre, calling at Piazza Beccaria, Piazza della Repubblica, Piazza Ferucci and Oltrarno. Bus number 62 goes to the airport, 12 and 13 run to Piazza Michelangelo, number 7 to Fiesole. Tickets can be bought from ATAF in the station, automatic vending machines and authorized distributors. Tickets are valid for 60 minutes with various options to save on the price, 3-24 hours, 2-3-7 day travel cards and monthly or yearly bus passes. It is possible to travel around the city by bike, a service offered by Florence by Bike, which organizes guided theme tours. The tours last three hours and provides the visitor with views of Rennaissance Florence and the surrounding hills. [[[Florence - Not to be missed]]] The Uffizi Gallery, with its entrance under the portico of the Palazzo degli Uffizi, is one of the most important art galleries in Italy and the oldest museum in modern Europe. It houses Italian works of art from all periods, from Medieval to Modern. Presently 2,000 individual works are exhibited. The ground floor houses ' The Ciclo di Uomini' by Andrea del Castagno (1450) and the ' Annunciazione' fresco by Sandro Botticeli (1481). The first large section comprises works from Tuscan Medieval painters from the 12th century to the 14th century including Duccio di Buoninsegna, Cimabue, Giotto, Ambrogio e Pietro Lorenzetti, Masaccio, Masolino, Beato Angelico, Piero della Francesca, Botticelli ( Nascita di Venere, Primavera), Leonardo (Adorazione dei Magi), Verrochio and Perugino. Rooms number 16 to 24 are the oldest rooms in the gallery, in particular room number 18, the octagonal Tribune, which houses classic statues and paintings from 15th century Florence.The other rooms contain paintings from the 14th and 15th century from different schools, together with sculptures including Luca Signorelli, Perugino, Albert Durer, Jan Brueghel il Vecchio, Lucas Cranach il Giovane, Giovanni Bellini and Andrea Mantegna.The first room along the third corridor is dedicated to the Florentine painting of the late Renaissance period including Michelangelo, Raffaello, Andrea del Sarto, Pontormo, Rosso Fiorentino and Bronzino.The rooms dedicated to the Venetian school and works from the Emiliano- Ferrara and Central Italy regions, follow on and include the works of Tiziano, with an entire room dedicated to his work ' Venere di Urbino', Palma il Vecchio, Parmigianino, El Greco and Tintoretto. Rooms 41 to 45 house the works of artists from the 16th and 17th century including Rubens, Van Dyck and Justus Sustermans. The Vasarian Corridor , accessible from the gallery's third corridor, was built in 1565 by Vasari to link the Uffizi to the Pitti Palazzo by means of the Ponte Vecchio. This zone houses works from Italian and foreign artists from the 17th and the 18th century, together with the beginning of the portrait gallery, with works dating back to the 15th century. The Bargello National Gallery, in via Proconsolo, is located in the Podesta building, erected between 1255 and 1345. Opened in 1865 with contributions from the Uffizi, the Mint and the State Archives, the museum is today one of the most important in the world, especially for Florentine Renaissance sculptures, French Medieval ivories and a collection of bronze mannerists. Visitors should see the Donatello Room, with the original moulds used during the competition to design the Baptistery doors. [[[Florence - Walks and tours]]] The walk which should be undertaken by first-time visitors to Florence is, above-all, that which leads to Fiesole. These picturesque hills can be reached by bus n°7, which leaves from the central train station. The area provides the best views over the city and has fine buildings of artistic and archaeological interest including the Duomo, the Roman Theatre and the S.Francesco church, positioned high on a hill, in a position that has won the admiration of poets and writers. Every second Sunday in the month sees the main square host to a characteristic antique market. The Estate Fiesolana festival with concerts, dances and plays takes place in the Roman theatre during the summer. [[[Florence - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volt, two or three pin plugs Climate : typical of the Tyrrenhian region, with mild but rainy winters and warm and dry summers. Opening hours : shops are open 9am to 7.30pm except Saturday afternoon in summer and Monday morning in winter. Banks are open Monday to Friday from 8:30 to 1.20pm and from 2.45pm to 3.45pm. The post offices are open from Monday to Saturday from 8.30 to 1.20pm. Restaurants are open from 12:30 to 3:30 pm and from 8pm to mid-night. Telephones : the code for Florence is 055 [[[Florence - A pocket guide]]] A short guide to markets and fesitvals: Second-hand and Flea Market in Piazza dei Ciompi (last Sunday in the month), International Antique Show in Palazzo Corsini (September -October),Florence's Musical May (end of April to June), Internationl Craft Fayre( April-beginning of May), Grillo Festival (Ascension), Historic Florentine Football (June), San Giovanni Festival, with fashion shows and firework display in Piazza Michelangelo (24 June), Rificolona Festival, which takes place on the river Arno (Annunciation) International Antique Festival ( odd-numbered years. September-October) . It is possible to make excellent purchases in the narrow lanes and streets of Florence. The best time is during the January and July sales. The city centre is rich in all sorts of shops, from used book shops to fashion stores. The widest choice of shops are to be found around Piazza Santa Croce, Piazza dei Compi and Piazza Santo Spirirto. Via Maggio, Festa and Borgo Ognissantii, house fine Florentine antique shops.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Milan Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Milan - Out and About]]] Milan, a northern Italian city, stands in the centre of the large Lombardy plain, between the the Po, Adda and Ticino river valleys. Like many cities of its kind located on a plain, the city radiates out,in a regular pattern from its nucleus, the ancient city centre. This large and lively city is an important financial centre, a creative fashion workshop and a place rich in artistic and cultural sights. The Piazza del Duomo, is recognised as the official centre of the city. The square is flanked by a long line of porticoes and on the square's left side, the entrance to the Vittorio Emanuele II. The two Arengario buildings facing the gallery from across the square, indicate the access point to Piazza Diaz. The irregular shaped square in front of the Royal Palace stands to the left of the Arengario buildings. The palace, built in Neo-Classic style, is the site of the Duomo Museum, which houses numerous temporary art exhibitions. The Duomo is the symbol of the city. This Gothic monument, whose construction started in 1386 and finished in the 18th century, is topped by numerous spires and decorated with 3,159 statues. Other important Milanese buildings include the Ca' Granda (Ospedale Maggiore), the Archbishops Palace, which is accessible from Piazza Fontana, the churches of S.Stefano Maggiore, S.Antonio Abate and S.Nazaro Maggiore, the Paleo-christian basilica of San Lorenzo, the Roman basilica of S.Ambrogio, the churches of S. Eustorgio, S,Satiro, S.Nazarro and S.Celso. The Castello Sforzesco, stands out among the city's many Renaissance buildings. The castle, built in 1368, is the site of the Civic Museum, dedicated to visual and applied art from the Medieval period to the 17th century, together with Paleo-Christian art and sections on ancient and Egyptian art. The Vittorio Emanuele II Gallery is one of the traditional meeting points for the residents of Milan. The gallery links Piazza del Duomo with Piazza della Scala. Corso Vittorio Emmanuele II is a pedestrianized area and is flanked by elegant shops and cinemas. Corso Buenos Aires is the lively main street in one of the most populated districts in Milan and the city's most important business area. Via Montenapoleone, first opened in the 18th century, is the most luxurious street in the city, lined by Neo-classic buildings and the finest shops in Milan. Milan is serviced by a wide public transport network, which allows the visitor to arrive at almost every corner of the city. Tickets are not sold on board but are available from newsagents or bars near the stops. Each ticket is valid for 75 minutes, during this time the ticket is valid for a single journey on the metropolitan or for all the journeys taken on the other forms of public transport during the 75 minute period. It is possible to tour the city by bus throughout the year. The service is organised by Autostradale. Tickets and timetables are available Tuesday to Sunday until 9:30pm from the APT information office in Arengario. Each tour lasts 3hours. the ticket price includes entrance to the Cenacolo Viciano and to the Pinacoteca in Brera. A typical 1920's tram, leaves Piazza Castello and takes passengers on a tour of the city every day at 11am 1pm and 3pm. It is possible to get on and off where you please. A recorded commentary is provided in a multitude of different languages. Boat trips along the Naviglio Grande, leave from Darsena every day at 9:30am and 3.30pm. On Saturday and Sunday the ticket price includes a walking tour of the courtyards near to the canal and an additional bus trip to visit the town of Abbiategrasso. Information about these trips is available from the APT office in Piazza Duomo. [[[Milan - Not to be missed]]] The Santa Maria delle Grazie is one of the most beautiful Renaissance churches in Milan. It was built between 1466 and 1490 in Lombardy-Gothic form by G.Solari and then modified by Bramante, who added the absidal part. The interior, with its three naves, owes its fascination above all to the Renaissance gallery built by Bramante, which is topped by a white dome, formed by four large arches , embellished by intricate carvings. Following on from the gallery, one passes into the cloisters, once again designed by Bramante. The famous Cenacolo Vinciano, painted by Leonardo, between 1495 and 1497, is on the far wall of the refectory of the ex- Dominican convent, to the left of the Delle Grazie church. The Brera Pinacoteca occupies 40 rooms and constitutes one of the largest collections of Italian paintings, with works of art of supreme importance. Established at the end of the 17th century in order to collect samples for the students of the Academy, it opened in 1803 and subsequently separated from the Academy in 1882. Some of the major works include those of the Venetians, Lombards and Emiliani from the 14th and 15th century, together with the Central Italian painters from the 14th to the 16th century, Italian painters from the 16th and 17th century and the complete works of the Jesi Donation. The Ambrosiana Pinacoteca also houses splendid works of art, with paintings by Bergognone, Botticelli, Vivarini, Tiziano and Moroni. Not to mention the 'Musico' by Leonardo, the ' Madonna among the Saints' by Michele and Ambrogio del Bramantino, the cartoons from the school of Athens of Raffaello and the renown ' Canestra di Frutta' by Caravaggio. The Poldi Pezzoli Museum, located in via Manzoni N° 12, is a typical Milan house- museum and serves as precious testament to the 18th flair for private collections. The collection is housed in 23 rooms and includes a collection of paintings from the 14th to the 19th century. The Bagatti Valsecchi Museum, in via S.Spirito 10, is another fine example of the 18th century taste for private collections. [[[Milan - Walks and tours]]] The recommended route for a tour outside Milan is that towards Brianza, a geographical area situated between the Pre-Alps, lakes and the river Ticino and Adda. The route is 120 km. long and starts from the town of Monza, continuing north to Meda and Inverigo. Further stages take the visitor to Oggiono, Monticello Brianza, Merate, Trezzo d'Adda, Crespi d'Adda and Cassano d'Adda. Monza, with its beautiful historical centre, closed to traffic, has as its major cultural attraction the Duomo. This building stands on the ruin of the ancient Oracolum, built for the Longobard Queen Teodolinda in 595. The interior of the Duomo is built as a latin cross with three naves, divided by cylindrical and octagonal columns with Romanic capitals sculptured with mythical animals. The side chapels, the two absidals and the vaults are covered completely with frescoes. The Teodolinda Chapel, covered with frescos by Zavattari, houses the Corona Ferrea (the iron crown), the precious jewel from the late Roman period, makes up part of the treasure housed in the Duomo Museum. Monza's other two note-worthy churches are the church and Francescan convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie, which is situated to the north-east of the centre, between the river Lambro and the road for Lecco, and the Santa Maria in Strada church, which takes its name from the 'Di Strada' zone, an ancient borough crossed by the main road which leads to Milan. The Arengario (communal palace), built in the second half of the XII th Century is situated in the heart of the town and is the seat of Monza's government. The Palazzo Comunale stands on an area which was once the towns market square, the ancient Pratum Magnum and where stands today Piazza Trento, Trieste and Piazza Carducci. The building is a fine example of architecture of the historic fascist period. Monza Park, with its river, villas, mills and Villa Reale, is located in Viale Brianza. The Villa Reale is a beautiful example of neoclassical architecture, built in 1777 for the empress Maria Teresa of Austria. The Villa, located inside the park, is surrounded by 40 hectares of English and Italian gardens. The gardens were initially built to the designs of Piermarini. The interior of the Villa houses, in addition to the royal apartments, the royal chapel, a small theatre, the Rotunda with Andrea Appiani frescoes, a museum and school of art. Trips to the lake region, north of the city, form part of the traditional tourist trip from Milan. Como is the closest of this lake to the city. The town is the nerve centre of the province of Como, where history, art and culture live side by side with industry and commerce in a setting framed by the unequalled beauty of the lake. Visitors should take time to see the Duomo and the adjacent Broletto, which dates back to the 13th Century and the Sant'Abbondio Basilica. Using either the picturesque boats or the faster hydrofoils it is possible to participate in memorable trips on the lake. Bellagio, the aristocratic jewel of the lake, is surrounded by villas and gardens, stands at the centre of Lake Como, at the point where the two southern forks divide. [[[Milan - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volts, a two or three pin plug is used Climate : Typical continental climate, with cold winters, dense and persistent fogs and very hot summers. Opening hours : Shops are open from 9am to 2pm and from 4pm to 8pm, except Saturday and Sunday afternoon and the week period around the 15th of August. Banks are open from Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 1.20 pm and from 2:45pm to 3:45 pm. The post office and other offices are open Monday to Friday from 8.30 to 1:20pm. restaurants are open from 12:30 to 3.30pm and from 8pm to midnight. [[[Milan - A pocket guide]]] The opera season at the La Scala Opera House and the International Decorative and Modern Industrial Art Exhibition, are but two of the many exhibitions and shows, on offer in Milan's cultural sector. Milan organizes many shows and exhibitions linked to the ancient tradition of the city, including the Oh bej Fair (-8 December), il Corteo dei Re Magi (6th January), la Navigli Fair (early June) dedicated to antiques and antique collectingand the Navigli Mercatone (last Sunday of the month). The open -air markets are a good source for shopping they include the markets in Via Zamagna, via Kramer, piazza Mirabello, viale Papiniano , via B .Marcello, via Aicardo, piazzale Martini, via Zuretti, via Fa and piazzale Lagosta. Among the small markets , the most famous is the Mercatino delle Pulci or ' Senegallia Fair' held in viale G.D'Annunzio, open on Saturday from 8.30am to 5pm. Traffic is banned in the evening from the central zone of Milan in order to give new life to the cinemas, bars and fashionable places situated between piazza del Duomo, via Torino, piazza San Babila and via Manzoni. A high concentration of restaurants and wine bars are located in the small squares in the Brera district and along the Pavese and Grande canals.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Naples Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Naples - Out and About]]] County town of Campania and the province of Naples, it is the third largest populated city in Italy and the largest city in the south of Italy. The city looks out over the Gulf of Naples and stretches for 8 kilometres between the lands of Campi Flegrei, the Sant'Elmo hills and Capodimonte on one side and the plains leading to Vesuvius on the other. Naples, founded in the 7th century, was an important location during the Greek-Roman era; becoming a Byzantine Duchy, a Norman-Swabian centre and finally a Angevin and Bourbon capital. The historic city centre is divided into six zones: Via Toledo with Castel Nuovo, Spaccanapoli, the Decumano Massimo, Capodimonte, i Vergini, Vomero, Castel dell'Ovo and Via Chiaia. Via Toledo is the most famous street in Naples and indicates the confines of the Spanish district. This lively zone, rich in artistic and historic sights, is the preferred location for those city residents wishing to take a leisurely stroll. Here the buildings of the nobility alternate between churches and shops ( Caffe Gambrinus, San Francesco di Paola, San Carlo Theatre, Umberto I Gallery, San Ferdinando and Santa Brigida). Piazza del Plebiscito, the old square once belonging to the Royal Palace (Palazzo Reale) is closed at the north-east end by the Palace itself. This square was once used for large public ceremonies and festivals. The Palace, built for a Spanish Viceroy, is open to the public, who have access to the Library, Royal apartments and the stable block. The Castelnuovo , a trapezoidal building with five round towers, stands in the castle square and is both the seat of the City Council and, since 1990, the site of the Civic Museum, which is located in the Palatina Chapel. The main street, known as Spaccanapoli, was the lower of the two principal streets during the Roman era (Decumano inferiore). The street is partially closed to traffic, however following the R1 ring road from Vomero and the R2 from the main train station, it is possible to arrive in Via Toledo, from where it is necessary to continue on foot. The Piazza Mercato zone is a true feast of art, with its uninterrupted rows of churches ( Sant'Anna dei Lombardi, Gesù Nuovo, San Domenico Maggiore and Santa Marta), convent buildings (Santa Maria La Nova, Santa Chiara and Gesù Vecchio), historic buildings (Palazzo Filomarino, Archivio di Stato, Monte di Pietà and Palazzo Carafa Sant'Angelo) and historic roads ( Piazza San Domenico Maggiore and Corso Umberto I). The Via dei Tribunali, in the heart of Greek-Roman Naples, is the Decumano Maggiore and one of the finest streets in the city.The area has a large concentration of both Gothic religious buildings ( San Lorenzo, San Gregorio Armeno, Gerolamini, San Pietro a Maiella and the Duomo) and historic buildings (Palazzo Spinelli, Castel Capuano, the Academy of Fine Arts and the National Archaeological Museum, one of the most important for Classical archaeology). Continuing along Via Toledo, the street leads into the Capodimonte Palace and Via Foria, site of the Orto Botanico (Botanical Gardens) and the Albergo dei Poveri. This zone, comprising the boroughs of Sanità, Vergini and Fontanelle, is a working class district of narrow streets and steps. Here the humble constructions alternate with the area's historic buildings( Palazzo dello Spagnolo, Palazzo Sanfelice , the Astronomy Observatory) and the areas churches, cemeteries and catacombs ( S.Maria della Sanità and S.Gaudisio catacomb, San Severo and San Giovanni a Carbonara catacomb and the catacomb of San Gennaro). A rack-railway train takes visitors to the summit of Vomero Hill, where it is possible to admire views over the city and the Gulf. Visitors should take time to visit Castel Sant'Elmo della Certosa di San Martino and the Floridiana Museums ( Duca di Martina National Ceramic Museum ). Nature and the sea blend together in the zone of Chiaia to surround the splendid Mergellina, Castel dell'Ovo (an ancient fortification, which looks out over the sea at Santa Lucia), the promenade, Piazza dei Martiri, Villa Pignatelli, Villa Comunale and Virgiliano Park. The rail network is definitely the best way to travel around Naples. The city has 2 metropolitan lines and 4 rack railways. The metropolitan FS ( line 2) is the oldest. It crosses the city calling at Central Station ( Piazza Garibaldi), the historic centre ( Montesanto), Mergellina Station, ( near to the hydro-foil station, where the boats depart for the islands in the Gulf)), the Fuorigrotta Stadium ( Campi Flegrei) and the town of Pozzuoli. The Collinare Metropolitana, links Piazza Dante with Vomero Hill and the Ospedaliera zone with Secondigliano. Three rack railways connect Vomero Hill: the one in Chiaia runs to Piazza Amedeo, from where it is easy to arrive at Via dei Mille, a zone with numerous elegant shops. The Central rack railway leads to Via Roma, site of the Umberto I Gallery and Plebiscito Palace. The Montesanto rack railway leads to Naples' historic centre. [[[Naples - Not to be missed]]] The National Archaeological Museum. This is one of the most important collections of ancient artefacts in the world. The nucleus of this collection comes from the excavations of Ercolano and Pompeii. The original site of this collection from 1750 to 1822, was Palazzo Reale di Portici. In addition to these two famous sites, various finds in Campania and southern Italy have been added to this collection. The museum houses marble sculptures dating back to the Greek-Roman era, jewels, gems and cameos, an Egyptian collection and mosaic fragments from the excavations of Ercolano, Stabia and Bosco Reale. The pictures and fragments on display illustrate mythological and literary themes, still-art, landscapes, scenes of daily life and portraits, of which one of the most famous is that of Paquio Proculo and his wife. This important find, discovered in a house in Pompeii, dates back to the end of the Neronian era. [[[Naples - Walks and tours]]] Via di Posillipo is a panoramic road lined with elegant coastal houses and sumptuous buildings, surrounded by parks. It initially runs along the coast and then climbs the promontory that separates the Gulf of Naples from that of Pozzuoli. The first part of Via Posillipo is dominated by the Villa Doria d'Angri quay. The XVI century Villa Quercia, easily identified with its pompeian red walls, stands overlooking the sea. From the Del Capo crossroads it is possible to contemplate the panorama immortalised by XVII th century artists, in their designs and paintings. Agnano Terme, situated 10 km. west of Naples, are thermal baths situated on the southern lip of a volcanic crater, which until 1870, was the site of a lake and today is the Agnano hippodrome, one of the best-known in Italy. The remains of a Roman bath can be seen on the slopes of Monte Spina. [[[Naples - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 V., 2 and 3 three-pinned are used Climate : mild winters and pleasant summer temperatures thanks to sea breezes. Little rainfall Opening hours : shops are open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., except for Saturday and Sunday afternoon and the two weeks either side of the 15th of August. Banks are open from Monday to Friday, from 8:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m. and from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The post offices are open from Monday to Saturday, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:20 p.m. Restaurants are open form 12:30 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. and from 8 p.m.until mid-night Telephones : the area code for Naples is 081. It is possible using countrydirect to telephone the operator of a foreign country who will connect the caller to the number chosen. To use this facility dial 172, followed by the number of the country required. [[[Naples - A pocket guide]]] The traditional religious festivals are concentrated in the summer months period, a time more adapted for open-air festivals: the San Gennaro festival (first Saturday in May and the 19th of September), Madonna del Carmine festival (16th of July), San Gregorio Armenio (December) with artistic nativity exhibition, Sant'Antonio festival (17th of January), beacons light up the city in these days. Naples art for singing is clearly seen during the Piedigrotta festival (September). Good Friday sees a recital of the Stabat Mater by Pergolesi in San Ferdinando Church, one of the classical musical events that characterize the neapolitan summer evenings and help cultivate and maintain this ancient tradition.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Rome Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Rome - Out and About]]] Rome stands 20 metres above sea level, about twenty kilometres from the Tyrrhenian coast, in the middle of the Roman countryside where the river Tiber winds itself among the sloping hills. It is the capital of the ancient world, of Christianity and of the Italian State, a large open-air museum with its wonderful open spaces and wide-reaching views, a true metropolis with 18 “quartieri” and 22 “rioni”, in continuous evolution. 6 itineraries (the Capitoline Hill, The Roman Forums, Piazza Navona, Piazza di Spagna, the Quirinale, the Vatican) are enough to reveal the huge appeal of this city where the sites of political power, the religious architecture, the aristocratic buildings, the art galleries and local meeting places all live side by side. The old walled centre of Rome was built in the 8th century B.C. on the Palatine Hill and from here, in the 5th century B.C., the city expanded, spreading over the Capitoline, the Quirinale, the Viminale, the Celio, the Esquilino and the Aventino hills, all within the walls built during the reign of Servio Tullius. During the reign of Emperor Augustus, the city grew as far as the banks of the Tiber and after the fire in 64 B.C., under the reign of Emperor Nero, the city’s architecture became increasingly significant (Domus Aurea, Coliseum, Terme di Tito) with wider roads, more solid buildings made in stone and more fountains. The Mediaeval period saw the building of several churches (S. Maria Maggiore, S. Maria d’Aracoeli, S. Giovanni in Laterano). During the Renaissance, the city was embellished with works by Michelangelo: the churches of St. Peter’s in the Vatican, S. Maria del Popolo, Palazzo Venezia, and the Quirinale Palace. The Baroque period was mostly given over to the works by Borromini and Bernini and Rome began to look much like it still does today, with the church at Trinità dei Monti, Palazzo Barberini, Montecitorio, the Trevi Fountain, Piazza Navona and Piazza di Spagna. The Capitoline Hill is a must for visitors, the citadel of ancient Rome: the Palazzo Nuovo and the Palazzo dei Conservatori, now the site of the Capitoline Museum, the Renaissance-period Palazzo Venezia with the adjoined Museum in Via del Plebiscito and the Basilica of San Marco, which is full of mosaics (827-844), all look down onto the square designed by Michelangelo. A visit to the Forum takes the visitor to the remains from various periods of Roman history. In the western part of the Forum, the Settiminus Severus Arch and the eight columns from Saturn’s Temple next to the Vespasiano Temple must be seen. The eastern part is dominated by the ruins, the ceiling and the arches from the Basilica di Costantino and the House of the Vestal Virgins. The visit continues towards the Trajan Markets from where one can look out onto Via IV Novembre from a large hall that then leads up to the upper floors, to Via Biberatica and the surrounding market places that provide a charming sight. Next to the markets, we find the Coliseum, the largest monument from ancient times, which is even more breathtaking in the evening, when it is artistically illuminated to show off the beauty of the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian columns. From the top floor it is possible to view the Arch of Constantine, the columns and apse of the Temple Arch of Tito and the Romanesque bell tower of the Church Santa Francesca Romana. The building of this magnificent construction was begun in 72 A.D. by Vespasiano, in the same place where an artificial lake connected to the Domeus Aurea was opened and inaugurated by Tito in the year 80, with games that went on for 100 days. Proceeding to the right, the visitor can view the amazing size of the Arch of Constantine which dates from 315, in memory of his victory over Massenzio. One of the main points in Roman social life is Piazza della Rotonda, full of open air cafés and restaurants, directly opposite the square’s most famous sight: the Pantheon, an example of Roman architecture from the time of the Emperor Hadrian. Inside, its treasures include the tomb of Raffaello and the inside of the dome. One of the prettiest squares in Rome is Piazza Navona, with its elongated shape, a work of art from the Baroque period. The square plays host to the Fontana dei Fiumi that holds up the Agonal obelisk by Bernini and the Church of S'Agnese in Agone, with its concave façade by Borromoni. Palazzo Braschi, now home to the Museum of Rome also looks out onto the square. Until the 19th century, the square was filled with water for competitions, games and tournaments. The church of San Luigi dei Francesi, filled with paintings by Caravaggio and the Baroque church of Sant’Andrea della Valle, famous for its attractive dome that is the largest in Rome after St Peter’s, and that was the scene for the first act of Puccini’s opera Tosca are also well worth a visit. In Piazza Navona, which is a pedestrian area, there is always a lot going on day and night, and is full of cafés and antique shops. Another area that attracts both tourists and Romans themselves is Piazza di Spagna and the adjacent streets running off Via del Corso. This square, with its Fontana della Barcaccia, (a work of art by Bernini from the 17th century) has been a meeting point for visitors for almost three centuries. On the south side we find the Spanish steps up to Trinità dei Monti, a truly beautiful sight when filled with azaleas right up to the Baroque church at the top of the steps. From the terrace at the top, the breathtaking views reach to the river Tiber and St Peter’s. In the square below, there is also Babington's Tea Rooms and in Via dei Condotti, which also plays host to the most exclusive shops in the area, there is the famous Caffè Greco opened in 1760, once a meeting place for foreign artists and writers. The Renaissance and Baroque works of art in the churches of Santa Maria del Popolo and Sant’Andrea delle Fratte, and the relief work on the Ara Pacis in Via di Ripetta are also beautiful. For a great view over the city, there is no better place than the Quirinale hill, full of churches, museums and galleries, historical buildings and fountains. Walking downhill along one of the many streets that lead to unforgettable corners of Rome, the visitor comes to the Trevi Fountain, in the square with the same name, which is attached to the side of Palazzo Poli. This is the largest, the most spectacular and the most famous of the Roman fountains, with its statue of Neptune surrounded by fairytale figures and four statues representing the four seasons. From the square we can see the ancient Papal Palace, Palazzo del Quirinale, which is now the official residence of the President of the Italian Republic. There are many churches hidden away in the side streets. The itinerary in the Vatican area includes a visit to St Peter’s and the Vatican Museums. St Peter’s is the beating heart of Catholicism, a site which attracts pilgrims from all over the world. The dome, designed by Michelangelo, from where one can see the perfect symmetry of Bernini’s columns, joins together the inside areas of the Cathedral, which was built by all the great architects from the Roman Renaissance (Michelangelo) and Baroque periods. In Rome there are two subway train lines, A and B, which cross over at Termini Station. Trains start running at 5.30 am and end at 11.30 pm (00.30 on Saturdays). Tourist routes and itineraries can be organised from various stations on the A line, linking visits to noteworthy monuments with shopping in the famous streets: the station Cipro for example, is the right stop to visit the Vatican Museums, Ottaviano is the right one for St. Peter’s. The stop called Lepanto leads directly onto Via Cola di Rienzo which is filled with shops for all purses. The station Flaminio can be used to reach Piazza del Popolo, Villa Borghese, il Pincio, S. Maria dei Miracoli, Via del Corso and Via del Babuino. The station Spagna takes you to the square bearing the same name, with the Spanish steps and Via dei Condotti. Not far away the Trevi Fountain, Via Veneto and the Tritone Fountain are close to the stop named Barberini; the Terme di Diocleziano are near the station Repubblica. Getting off at the stop Vittorio Emanuele takes you to the Basilica di S. Maria Maggiore. S.Giovanni brings you close to the Basilica with the same name and to the Holy Steps. At the station Cinecittà, one can visit the film studios. To visit the Via Appia and the Catacombs, it is necessary to get off at Colli Albani. Important stations for tourists on line B are: S.Paolo, to visit the Basilica with the same name; Piramide, to visit the Pyramid of Caius Cestius, Circo Massimo and Colosseo, to allow visitors to reach the Colosseum and the Roman Forum. The stop Cavour takes you near to S.Pietro in Vincoli. There are 200 different bus routes that criss-cross Rome from 5.30 am to midnight. Fast or express lines, Esatt lines and electrical buses, night buses, disabled buses. Roman public transport is called Metrebus. Buying a Metrebus ticket, in fact, allows you to travel on the three means of transport, on the various routes, within one zone or in several zones. [[[Rome - Not to be missed]]] In Viale Vaticano, there is one of the most important museums in the world, divided into many different sections that are wonderfully decorated and which hold works of art by the greatest artists, all commissioned or collected by various Popes over the centuries. Inside, for example, the Egyptian museum, there are stone tablets and inscriptions from various eras, sarcophagi and mummies, statues from the Roman era and pottery from periods from before the Roman era. Raffaello’s Rooms and lodges made up Pope Julius II’s residence on the second floor of the palace. There are also frescoes by Perugino, Bramantino and Raffaello, arranged in series and which lead from one to another. At the end of the route there is the Sistine Chapel, which was recently restored, to give back the original colours that had faded over time to Michelangelo’s Universal Judgement. This is where the Conclave meets to elect the popes and where other solemn Papal ceremonies are held. It is a large rectangular hall, with a vaulted ceiling, divided by a marble wall for the choir stalls. On the long walls there are paintings of the Life of Moses on one side and the Life of Jesus on the other, painted between 1481 and 1483 by Perugino, Botticelli and Ghirlandaio. However, the most famous work of art is the one done by Michelangelo, who was chosen in 1508 by Julius II to decorate the vault. The theme chosen for the painting can be summed up as a representation of Mankind waiting for the arrival of the Messiah. Twenty years later, Michelangelo Buonarroti returned to the Sistine Chapel on appointment by Paul III (1534-49) to paint the Universal Judgement on the wall behind the altar. Michelangelo worked on this huge painting from 1536 to 1541. In Piazza del Campidoglio (the Capitoline Hill) we can find the Capitoline Museums, the oldest public collection in the world, which includes extremely valuable sculptures such as the Galata Morente and the Capitoline Venus. The picture gallery holds paintings from the 14th to the 17th centuries by painters such as Tiziano, Bellini and Caravaggio. [[[Rome - Walks and tours]]] 23 km from Roma there is an area known as the Castelli Romani (Roman Castles), which owes its name to the many aristocratic residences built all over this valley. The itinerary offers a peaceful view of vineyards and olive groves, the sight of Roman ruins and ancient abbeys, Baroque squares and medieval walls. Frascati can be reached by travelling along the State Road “125” and then heading for Tuscolo and Monte Porzio Catone; the state road “155” takes us to Palestrina, a medieval town which is also the site of ancient walls. The route then heads for Rocca Priora and Grottaferrata with its imposing walls and bastions, its abbey and the Basilica from the 12th—13th century. The itinerary then turns towards Marino, Rocca di Papa and Nemi, an agricultural village famous for its strawberries and its flowers, with the Roman ship museum which houses boats from the 1st century A.D. From Velletri, taking the state road 21, the tour passes through Genzano di Roma, Ariccia, Albano Laziale and Castel Gandolfo, a small town that looks down from the west side onto the crater that is now Lake Albano. The town has a medieval centre and a large complex that is the Popes’ summer residence. The astronomy observatory, the Specola Vaticana is an important site. From Castel Gandolfo, the Via Appia, the state “A” road no.7 leads back to Rome. [[[Rome - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 volts; two or three pin plugs. Climate : winter days, mild and bright, humid in July and August. Opening hours : the shops are open from 9 until 1 pm. In the afternoon they reopen at 3.30 pm until 7.30 pm in the winter and from 4 pm until 8 pm in the summer. Food shops are closed on Thursday afternoons in winter and on Saturday afternoons in the summer. Banks are usually open from Mondays to Fridays from 8.30 am to 1.30 pm and from 2.30 pm until 4 pm. Post offices are open to the public from Monday to Friday from 8.30 am to 6.30 pm and on Saturdays from 8.30 to 1.00. Telephones : the code for Rome is 06. To call abroad it is necessary to dial first the international code (00) followed by the code of the country being called, the area code and the telephone number [[[Rome - A pocket guide]]] The most picturesque market in Rome is made up of the fruit, vegetable and flower stalls in Piazza Campo de’ Fiori, open each morning. There is also a market in Piazza Testaccio that has excellent objects on sale at reasonable prices. At the Porta Portese market in Via Portuense and Via Nievo you can find just about everything for sale in a stylish disorganised order: clothes, shoes, boxes, furniture, plants, and cameras. In Rome there are many local events that are held in various streets or quarters: “Cento Pittori” (one hundred painters) in via Margutta that is held in spring and autumn; Via Giulia plays host to art exhibitions and the street’s art galleries and antique shops offers refreshments to the visitors. Towards the end of July in Trastevere, there is a local folk festival with various market stalls too.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Sicily Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Sicily - Out and About]]] The geographical location, the beautiful nature,the history,art and culture make Sicily an island rich in fascination. Much loved by poets, writers, travellers and foreigners in general, the island offers a vast choice for whoever wishes to reward themself with a reviving holiday of both mind and body. Sicily is above-all a natural attraction with its countryside, coastline, mountains, plains,gulfs and islands. The capital city is Palermo and the county towns are Catania, Messina, Siracusa, Trapani, Ragusa, Caltanisseta, Agrigento and Enna. Sicily is the largest and most populated island in the Mediterranean, separated from the Italian mainland by the Straits of Messina. The island possesses 1,039 km of jagged coastline. The Tyrrhenian part of the coast is composed of inlets and peninsulas and comprises the gulfs of Milazzi, Patti, Termini, Imerese, Palermo, and Castellammare. The west coast from Trapani towards the south is marshy and has few inlets. The south coast has a similar conformation and is the site of the Gulf of Gela. The section of the island that looks out over the Mediterranean is flatter and sandy. The Ionian Sea, laps the shores of Sicily in an area which alternates between high rocky outcrops and low sandy beaches. The relief of the island can be separated into various mountain groups, the principal group being the Siculo Appenines which cross Tirreno in the northern part of the island, from Capo Faro to Capo Lilebeo. This mountain group can be divided into three sections: the Peloritani, the Nebrodior Caronie and the Madonie. Monte Ghibellini is situated in the western zone of the island, while the Solifero Plateau is located in the central-southern zone.The Eolie and Lipari islands form part of the Sicilian archipelago, which is located to the north of the Gulf of Milazzo. The most important islands are Vulcano, Lipari and Salina, while the smallest are Filicudi, Panarea, Alicudi and Stromboli. The Egadi archipelago is located off the western coast and is made up of three major islands. Favignana, Levanzo and Marettimo and by the minor islands of Formica and Maraone. The Pelagie islands are those islands situated the furthest distance away from Sicily and are included within the territory of the province of Agrigento. The archipelago, 200km away from Sicily, includes the island of Lampedusa, Linosa and Lampione. The island of Ustica is surrounded by the Tyrrhenian Sea. Sicily is connected to the mainland by a series of sea and air links. The Straits of Messina are the crossroads for those people visiting the islands from both Italy and Europe. Palermo, with its airport Punta Raisi, provides links with Naples, Cagliari, Tunisia and Ustica.Other major sicilian airports include Fontanarossa near Catania and Birgi near Trapani.The road and rail system is limited to the routes Messina-Palermo along the Tyrrhenian coast, the Palermo-Catania-Siracusa along the Ionic coastland the Palermo-Catania which crosses the inner part of the island. the rail network allows the visitor to travel to the archaeological sites outside the cities,such as Segeta and Selinunte. A rail card exists, which allows unlimited travel for 8,15,21 or 30 days, available in first or second class. It is also possible to obtain a kilometric ticket, valid for a maximum of five people in any one group for a distance of not less than 3,000 kilometres. [[[Sicily - Not to be missed]]] Palermo is a sumptuous city situated on the splendid Conca d'Oro at the foot of Monte Pellegrino. The city was already inhabited during ancient times , the Phoenicians referred to Palermo as Ziz (flower), it was occupied by the Greeks, the Carthaginians made their base here as did the Romans, Byzantines and the Arabs, who made the city the capital of the island. It was with the Normans however that the city became rich and cosmopolitan, living a splendid era of development in the arts, a period which was continued during the reign of Federico II. Upon becoming an Aragonese city, Palermo underwent a profound changes, establishing itself as a Baroque city. The itinerary recommended allows the visitor to admire this wonderful mix of architectural styles, and to observe the monuments grouped together in this area, which reflect the artistic and historic aspects of the city. The departure point for the tour is the Palazzo dei Normanni, with the Palantina Chapel, the Royal Apartments and the S,Giovanni degli Eremiti Church. After having reached the Zisa in via Colonna and Cuba in Corso Calatifimi, the route returns to the Palazzo dei Normanni. From here the tour proceeds along Corso Vittorio Emanuele towards the Cathedral, from here turning left on Via Marqueda to S.Cataldo and Martorana. The tour continues to Magione, onwards along Corso dei Mille before finally arriving at S.Giovanni dei Lebbrosi. Agrigentino differs from the rest of the island in its colours , rendered more vivid and brilliant thanks to its African climatic conditions. Apart from the notable colours, the area also possesses the highest concentration of monuments and artefacts from the Greek civilization in Sicily. The Valle dei Templi, with its 5th century temples, stands in the southern most part of Agrigento,on the ruins of the ancient city. The temples stand almost in a straight line and bear the names of Greek Gods. The Zeus Olimpio Temple was built on the occasion of the victory in 480 A.C by the Agrigentini over the Carthaginans. The Castore and Poluce Temple from the 5th century A:C. The Temple of Heracles,which is the oldest and contains eight tapered columns. The Temple of Hera Lincinia, built in the 5th century A.C and set on fire by the Carthaginians in 406 A.C, has miraculously managed to maintain its columns intact. Baroque, fantasy and decoration reign in the town of Ragusa, the most important centre in the Iblei Mounts zone. A place which embodies the natural and historical characteristics which distinguish this corner of Sicily. The centre of the town rotates around Corso Italia, a road that in climbing ,cuts the old residential centre of the town in two from east to west. The view from the centre allows the visitor to admire the the splendid scenery of the two valleys, site of the original nucleus of the city. La Rotonda Terrace stands at the extreme northern end of Via Roma. From the terrace it is possible to enjoy the view over San Leonardo valley and glimpse the majestic dome of the San Giorgio Duomo, which stands on the top of the Ibla. The other end of Via Roma is the site of the Ponte (bridge), where it is possible to appreciate the fine view of the Santa Domenica valley. By following the state road N° 194, it is possible to arrive at Giarratana, Monterosso Almo and Vizzini. Continuing on to Grammichele and Caltagirone, where the oldest ceramic art techniques in the world are practised. from here the route leads south -west along the state road 417 and 117 to Gela. Following the coastal road the visitor arrives at Camarina, Marinadi Ragusa and the mouth of the river Irminio. The return to Ragusa takes in a visit to Modica, a very pretty location with Baroque architecture, the San. Pietro Church and staircase, Tedeschi building and the S. Maria del Soccorso and S. Giorgio Church. A visit to Siracusa and its territory which occupies the southern part of the island, permits the visitor to enter into contact with an era that dates back to 2,000 years B.C, passes through the Hellenic culture and arrives at the Baroque period. Noto is without a doubt the emblematic town of this zone, representing in the fullest form possible these important historical periods. A small town laid out to an original design, on the terraces on the slopes of a hill. The roads run straight and parallel only to be joined by the sharing of the town's squares. The fulcrum of the town is the beautiful Piazza del Municipio. the Baroque Duomo, the Ducezio building, the Archbishop's residence and the Landolina building all look onto the Piazza del Municipio. Ancient Noto is located 10km away in an archaeological park, which preserves the remains of a Greek gymnasium. Catania, a large and beautiful city, is located on the east coast of Sicily. the town occupies a magnificent position on the fruit farming plain at the foot of the initial slopes of Etna. the city has a pre-dominantly baroque feel, evident in its numerous churches (the Duomo façade, S.Agata,and S.Nicolò) and the buildings (San Giuliano, Biscari and the Town Hall) The seaside town of Taormina looks out over the Ionian sea from a terrace perched 200 metres above the water. The landscape is made even more impressive by the presence of the mighty Etna volcano. Taormina has always been a major Sicilian tourist attraction, thanks to its mild climate, natural beauty and its priceless treasures of historic and cultural events. The town still preserves the remains of the Greek era (Serapide Temple, Hellenic Temple) and the Roman era ( the theatre on Monte Tauro Odeon Roman Theatre, the Roman Aqueduct and the Naumachia and Roman baths in the centre of the city). The medieval centre of the town is the site of the Orologio (clock) Tower, the Corvaia building, S. Caterina Church, the Duomo, the Santo Stefano building and the Gothic ex-church of Sant'Agostino) [[[Sicily - Walks and tours]]] It is in Trapanese, between Egadi and Pantelleria that Sicily shows its true natural colours and a trip to this location is not easily forgotten. The colours, the smells, the glimpses of crystal clear water and the traces of history left by the Carthaginians, Romans and Arabs leave a lasting impression on the visitor. The departure point for a tour is Trapani along a secondary road that leads to Erice, then by sea to Egadi, a marine reserve rich in caves and uncontaminated coves rich in history. Back on the main island, the tour continues to Saline, touching Mazia and Marsala. Following the state road 115, the visitor arrives at Mazaro del Vallo, Castelvetrano and with a brief detour the archaeological site of Selinunte. The site, with its abundance of remains, constitutes one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mediterranean and contains oriental temples, the Acropolis, the Sanctuary of Malophoros and the Archaeological Museum. Pantelleria, one of the major Sicilian islands, is rich in secondary volcanic activity from geysers to vapour filled caves. The Bagno di Venere is situated 6km from the town, and are the most important thermal baths. The site is a wonderful turquoise lake inside a half a kilometre wide crater. The western side of the crater is the site of a sulphur spring. The water at this sulphur spring is heated by small calderas. The sea and mountain landscapes are attractive reasons for visiting this area together with the archaeological zones which house the remains of the ancient historic dwelling Mursia and the Barbacane Medieval Castle. The vineyards of Pantelleria are noted for their excellent desert wine production using the celebrated zibibbo grape, nurtured by the African sun. the wine was already highly praised at the time of the Phoenicians. [[[Sicily - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Climate : The north and east coast have mild winters and warm summers with little rainfall. The climate inland and on the coast is hotter and sometimes torrid, with the presence of warm and wet scirocco winds, which blow from Africa Opening hours : Shops are open from 9amto 2pm and 4pm to 8pm, except for Saturday and Sunday afternoons and the two week period around the 5th of August. Banks are open from Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 1:20pm and from 2:45 to 3:45 pm. The post office is open from Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 1:20 pm. Restaurants are open from 12:30 to 3:30pm and from 8pm to mid-night. Telephones : : Palermo 091, Agrigento 0922, Catania 095, Enna 0935, Messina 090, Ragusa 0932, Siracusa 0931, Trapani 0923 [[[Sicily - A pocket guide]]] Tradition and folklore, particularly with a religious significance, is an important element in Sicilian life. Sicily is also noted for maintaining its strong traditions in the island's arts and crafts. The finest expression of Sicilian art and craftwork is its ceramic and pottery. The most important craft centres are Caltagirone, Messina, Trapani, Camastra, Palermo, Burgio and Sciacca. The Sicilian carts used during the island's various festivals are a much loved aspect of the island. They are highly coloured, rich in decorations, paintings and ornaments. The paintings on the sides of the carts feature heroic deeds, the life of saints and the mythical Sicilian puppets. Sicilian food, the result of thousands of years of gastronomic history, is highly praised. During the summer months, it is common practice to breakfast eating a brioche (croissant) accompanied by a granita. Granita is a sorbet drink, prepared with fruit juice, coffee, or with almond or mulberry flavoured milk.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Venice Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Venice - Out and About]]] testo> 
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 <titolo>Amsterdam Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Amsterdam - Out and About]]] Amsterdam, situated in Ijsselmeer, at the point where the rivers Amstel and Ij converge, is the capital of Holland. The city, built on 90 small islands, linked by over 500 bridges, spans out from its old historic district, located at the water’s edge. Amsterdam is a double-sided city, of water and land, of orderliness and beauty and a network of canals, islands and waterways that blend harmoniously with the surrounding houses. The two eras, sea trade and industrial, are easily recognised within the fabric of the city. The nucleus of the port area, housing 16th century buildings and factory warehouses, has three concentric canals(Grachten) running through it, with the Singelgracht indicating the zone’s outer limits. This historic area is home to the city’s administration centre, various large business organizations, the stock exchange and the Dam and Rokin banks. The 18th century part of the city, housing the residential area of the port and factory workers, lies beyond the Singelgracht. Those companies linked to the port industry(Buiksloot and Tuindorp) are situated to the north of the river Ij. The ancient city contains two centres, the Oude Zijde and the Nieuwe Zijde. The circle of canals in the centre of this zone are lined with numerous buildings dating back to Amsterdam’s “ Golden Era”, while the “Plantage” parkland area of this zone, houses the Hortus Botanicus, built in 1682 and which now contains over 6000 species of plants. The Singel is the oldest circular canal in Amsterdam and indicates the confines, which separate the old medieval city from the circle of canals to the west and centre. The historic buildings and monuments, located within the Oude Zijde, include: the Trippenhuis; the Montelbaanstoren, a 16th century tower; the Waag , Amsterdam’s oldest port and the Pinterhuis public library. The city’s museums comprise: the Cannabis Museum; the Museum Het Rembrandthuis, which contains hundreds of Rembrandt’s watercolours and the Joods Historisch Museum, a complex housing four synagogues, displaying artistic and religious artefacts, narrating the history and culture of Judaism in the Netherlands. The Oude Kerk, a 13th century Gothic church, which today has become a basilica, was a medieval refuge for the poor and homeless. The basilica’s Chapel of the Virgin possesses magnificent stained-glass windows. The south western area of the Oude Zijde is the site of the University of Amsterdam, founded in 1877. The red light district, known as Walletjes (the small walls), is situated beyond the Damstraat. Nieuwe Zijde (new part) is located in the western zone of medieval Amsterdam and is easily reached by public transport. Dam square forms the main centre of this zone and the starting point for two bustling streets. These two streets house two of the city’s finest monuments, the classic Royal Palace (1648-55), which today is the site of the Town Hall and the late Gothic Nieuwe Kerk “new church”, built in the 15th century. The city also has numerous examples of baroque architecture both in its religious and civil buildings: Koninklijk Paleis, National Monument, Centraal Station, Postkantor, Lutherse Kerk, Madame Tussauds Scenerama and the Amstelkring Museum .Some of the streets around the lively Kalverstraat shopping area, follow the route of ancient paths and alleys. The Rokin and Nes streets are renown for being the home of the city’s financial institutions and the location of alternative theatres. Visitors should spend time to visit: the Begijnhof district, with its meeting square and beautiful houses, now considered to be a historical monument; the Houten Huys, the oldest house in Amsterdam, the Catholic chapel and the English church. Jordaan, situated to the west of Grachtengordel, at only five minutes walk from the Dam and Centraal Station, is home to the most important canal-side houses. The zone is a labyrinth of narrow streets and canals with lively bars and “dark” cafés, which spread onto the pavement during the summer months. Iit is also home to the Anne Frank Foundation, which purchased the house, where, during the Nazi occupation, the Jewish families Frank and Van Daan hid for over two years, until the moment of their arrest. The best way to visit Amsterdam is on foot. The city lay-out is simple with circular canals and intersecting streets. Using Singel as the departure point, the canals are arranged in alphabetical order: Herengracht, Keisergracht, Prinsengracht and Singelgracht. The houses, starting from Centraal Station, are numbered, increasing in value as they approach Amstel . The well developed public transport network, comprising bus, train, tram and barge, has its nucleus based around the Centraal Station. A book of tickets (strippenkarten) can be purchased direct from the driver, or the automatic ticket dispensers or the local tourist office(VVV). These tickets are valid for travel anywhere within Holland. Amsterdam is divided into 11 zones and the cost of a ticket depends on the distance travelled between one and the other. A simpler solution could be to purchase a one day travel card (dagkaart). There are 17 tram routes in Amsterdam which operate from 6am to midnight. Those routes of major interest to the tourist are the lines which travel south from Centraal Station along the Damrak and the NZ Vooburgwal. Lines 13,14and 17 run to the Jordaan.The metropolitan is rarely used by visitors to Amsterdam, it has only 3 lines and serves only 4 stations, all of which are located to the east of the city: AmsterdamCS, Nieumarkt, Waterlooplein and Weespeplein. Without a doubt the best method of transport within Amsterdam is the bicycle, with the city’s traffic system having been studied specifically to cater for the cyclist. The system includes cycle routes (fietspaden), maps, traffic lights and link roads. Canal trips leave from Centraal Station and run along the Prins,Hendrikkade, the Damrak and the Rokin. The Canalbus offers a round trip from Singelgracht via Rijkmuseum to Centraal Station, calling at Leidesplein, Leidsestraat/Keizergracht and Westerkerk for Anne Frankhuis. Visitors are free to get on and off as they please. [[[Amsterdam - Not to be missed]]] The Museumplein is lined with the city’s main museums and cultural centres. The Rijksmuseum houses the world’s largest collection of Dutch masterpieces, from the earliest religious works to masterpieces from the golden era. The tour starts with 17th Century paintings by artists such as Vermeer and Haks and finishes with Rembrandt’s Ronda. The Van Gogh musem, houses 200 paintings and 500 designs by the famous artist, together with the 800 letters which passed between Van Gogh and his brother Theo. The Stedelijk Museum has works of art by Matisse, Mondriaan, Monet and Picasso together with displays of sculpture and artistic and industrial design. [[[Amsterdam - Walks and tours]]] Amsterdam, situated at the heart of Holland’s transport system has fast and efficient links to to the towns and villages in the Netherlands. The bicycle, however, still remains the best way to travel and is ideal in order to see the wonderful fields of flowers around the city. There are many interesting sights within easy reach of the city. Haarlem and Ledia are located just 15 minutes away, the historic town of Utrecht lies to the south of the city and the town of Edam is just 22km north of Amsterdam. Departing from Haarlem, it is possible to tour the wonderful fields of flowers. This 30km strip of land between Haarlem and Ledia is referred to as the Bloembollenstreek, and is best viewed from the middle of April to the end of May, when the tulips and lilacs are in their full splendour. The VVV supplies all the necessary information to visit the area together with details of hiring bicycles from Haarlem station. [[[Amsterdam - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Climate : The climate is temperate with a large amount of humidity. The sky is often cloudy and rainfalls are frequent. Opening hours : Shops are open from 8:30am to 5:30pm except for Thursday when they close at 9pm and Saturday when they close at 5pm. Restaurants stop serving at 10pm and close at 11pm. Bars and cafés close at 2am. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm. The state museums are open on Sundays and close on Mondays. Telephones : Country code 0939 followed by the area code without the initial zero. To call Italy from Holland dial 0031 followed by the area code without the initial zero. [[[Amsterdam - A pocket guide]]] Amsterdam provides something for all tastes. The city’s continuous restaurant activity allows the visitor to sample a wide variety of food in any of its numerous bars and cafes. Eetcafes are small, reasonably priced restaurants. The more typical of these restaurants are the bruine kroegen (dark cafés), so called because of their ceilings and walls, stained by smoke and nicotine. The city is one large market, where it is impossible not to find what you are looking for. Noteable areas include: Nieuwendijk, a pedestrianized zone, parallel to Damrak; Dam Square; Rokin, which is a continuation of Damrak, and the large bustling pedestrianized Kalverstraat. The Jordan district, between Prinsengracht and Lijnbaansgraacht, is the area which offers incredible surprises with its array of extraordinary shops. Amsterdam offers a wide range of entertainment at international level. American Jazz is played in various locations around Amsterdam and the city annually hosts the Blues Festival and the Drum Rhythm Festival. The main jazz club in the city is the Bimhuis, with the Café du Lac and the Zilver Café offering jazz music Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon. Amsterdam has many street artists, cafés open until late and in the summer months, offers its visitors various open air theatres: Vondelpark, Nederlands Filmmuseum, Amsterdamse Bs and Amstelpark. A calendar of events is detailed in the monthly Amsterdam Times; the weekly What’s On in Amsterdam; or the free Uitkrankt, available in cafés and bookshops.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>41</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Auckland Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Auckland - Out and About]]] Auckland, situated on North Island, between the Pacific Ocean and the Tasmanian Sea, is the main industrial centre and principle port of entry to New Zealand. In spite of the political power of Wellington, Auckland is the fulcrum of the country’s commercial activity. The city has approximately 1 million inhabitants and from an administrative point of view, is made up of separate towns merged into one large urban conglomeration. The true city of Auckland is located between the ports of Waiemata and Manukau . The city is located 300km from the northern-most point of North Island. It spans a narrow neck of jagged coastline, with thousands of bays and inlets, which make Auckland’s position both unique and fascinating. Numerous rugged hills rise up and encircle the city, these are the traces of the 48 volcanoes, which, over 50,000 years ago, helped to form this neck of land and the jagged coastline. Eruptions are however a thing of the past, with the last eruption dating back to around 1250. When the Polynesians arrived here by canoe around 600 years ago, they immediately realised how fertile this area was and decided to settle here. They built various fortified villages on the surrounding volcanic peaks. In 1839, when the first Europeans arrived, the Maori population had already been decimated by tribal feuds and disease and the area was practically deserted. In 1840 William Hobson, the first governor of New Zealand, gave the name Auckland to the new settlement, taking its name from Lord Auckland, the Viceroy of India at that time. Auckland was proclaimed the capital city, a title, which after 25 years, was transferred to Wellington. Auckland, a fascinating and modern city, has a unique position, set amongst a multitude of bays and inlets, a true paradise for water-sport fans.. Auckland is the “Yachting City”, evident in the enormous number of yachts and boats moored in its splendid tourist port. Yachting is the most practised sport among the inhabitants of Auckland, who, in 2000, witnessed the victory of their local team in the world renown yachting race, the America’s Cup. The heart of the city is focused around Auckland’s port, which has nothing to fear when compared with other perhaps better known ports such as Sydney, Hong Kong, San Francisco and Cape Town. The commercial centre is situated in Queen Street, the city’s main street, which runs from Queen Elizabeth II Square to the cosmopolitan Karangahape Rd. This area has the city’s highest concentration of hotels, restaurants, and evening entertainment. Parnell, located 2km from the centre, is an elegant zone, characterised by numerous wooden houses. Modern architecture has been put aside in this area in favour of accurate and careful restoration to bring the elegant old buildings and shops back to their original splendour. In Parnell Road, one of the most fascinating street in the whole of New Zealand, it is possible to find numerous restaurants, boutiques and art and craft shops. Parnell Village consists of groups of architecuraly similar houses and is characterised by its narrow paved streets, courtyards and pedestrianized zones lined by exclusive shops. Auckland has an efficient bus transport system. The main bus terminal is the Downtown Bus Centre in Commerce Street. There is also a well-developed metropolitan, the Tranz Metro, which has two main lines: one travels west towards Waetakere and the other south, towards Papakura. Ferries, operated by Fullers, link the Quay Street Terminal with the more out-lying suburbs: Devonport, Bayswater, Birkenhead and Stanley Bay. Various taxi companies operate in Auckland and have ranks throughout the city. Taxies may be hailed in the street, however it is advisable to book them by telephone. The Auckland Cooperative Taxi Society is one of the largest in the city, all its taxies have meters. Given the large dimension of the city, having your own personal car would be very useful. Auckland’s roads are in good condition and well sign-posted. The city centre is very congested particularly during rush hour and parking is always a problem. Albert Street, Custom Street West and Beresford Street all have 24 hour parking. [[[Auckland - Not to be missed]]] Auckland is a city rich in important museums and interesting buildings, including the Auckland Museum, the New Zealand National Maritime Museum and the Auckland City Art Gallery. The Auckland Museum houses an interesting natural history section and a magnificent collection of Mauri artefacts, including the highly interesting Waka Te Toki a Tapiri, a 25- metre- long war canoe. The New Zealand National Maritime Museum details the thousand-year-old history of sailing in New Zealand and houses a large number of yachting artefacts. The Auckland City Art Gallery is located in two separate buildings and houses, in one building, a large collection from New Zealand past artists and in the other, numerous temporary displays of contemporary art. The city is home to many historic buildings dating back to the colonial era, all of which have been restored and well preserved. Some noteworthy examples include: Acacia Cottage (in Cornwall Park), Highwic (40 Gillies Ave), Ewelme Cottage (14 Ayr St), Kinder House (2 Ayr St) and the 19th century Alberton (1 Kerr-Taylor Ave). Auckland’s modern architecture is well represented by the Skytower, an imposing structure, which at a height of 328 metres, is New Zealand’s highest building. The tower forms part of the Sky City Complex which houses various casinos, restaurants and shops. Visitors can take the lift, which in 40 seconds transports them up to the tower First Observation Point. It is however worth the effort to climb to the last level, where it is possible to admire a spectacular view over the city and its port. [[[Auckland - Walks and tours]]] The Hauraki Gulf Maritime Park consists of 47 islands, some of which are located only a few minutes sailing time from Auckland and are therefore a favourite destination for day-trippers. Not all of the islands can be visited as some are nature reserves accessible only with special permission. Those islands equipped to welcome visitors are highly popular during the weekends. They include the Rangitoto volcanic island, whose volcanic cone emerged from the sea only 600 years ago. The island is the largest in the zone and from its summit the visitor is able to admire a magnificent view. A visit to Rangitoto can be combined with a visit to Motutapu, an island covered in fields and meadows, which is linked to Rangitoto by means of a fly-over bridge. [[[Auckland - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : NZ$ Electric supply: 230 V., 50 Hz., the Australian round, three pinned plug is used. Climate : Auckland has a all year round temperate climate even if it often rains. The best period to visit, like the rest of New Zealand, is the summer from November to February. The average temperature in July, the coldest month, is approx. 10°C and in February approx. 20°C. Language : English, Maori Opening hours : offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm. Government offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am. to 4:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Friday from 9 am to 5 pm., and Saturday morning from 9 am to 12:30 pm. Once a week there is late night shopping (Thursday or Friday) until 9 pm. Telephones : The national code for Auckland is 09. [[[Auckland - A pocket guide]]] Auckland is a multi-ethnic city with a wide range of restaurants. There is a vast choice of Japanese, Korean, Indian and Oriental cuisine . The zones of Parnell and Ponsonby both have a large concentration of cafés and restaurants. A complete list of Auckland’s restaurants is available in the Dining Guide, published by Diners Club.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>42</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Christchurch Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Christchurch - Out and About]]] Christchurch with its 310.000 inhabitants, is the largest city on South Island. The city is set in the heart of the Canterbury region, one of the flattest zones in New Zealand. Large, orderly and well kept, Christchurch, with its architecture and typically Anglo-Saxon landscape, is considered the most English of cities outside the British Isles. The picturesque river Avon runs through the city, which is centred around the Gothic Canterbury Cathedral. Christchurch, dubbed the “Garden City” is rich in splendid open spaces, gardens and numerous parks, which render the city highly attractive. The peaceful suburbs of Fendalton, Avonhead and Burnside, are characterised by their large expanses of geraniums, chrysanthemums and manicured lawns. Hagley Park, the natural lungs of the city, stretches over an area of 161 hectares. The popular Garden City Festival of Flowers is held every February in Christchurch, when the city is immersed in flowers and explodes with colour and scents. The reputation of the Garden City, is perfectly represented by the Botanic Ggardens, undoubtedly the finest collection of indigenous and exotic plants in all of New Zealand. This unique spectacle is open all year round from 7am to 1 hour before sunset. The city is flat and has been built to a regular, uniform plan. It is therefore relatively easy to travel around on foot, even if the city’s main street often meets the meandering river Avon, which winds its way directly through Christchurch. Cathedral Square is the fulcrum of the city and the ideal departure point for a city tour. The cathedral is a Gothic building with a 63 metre high spire, that soars above the square and from whose panoramic balconies, it is possible to enjoy a splendid view of the city. Every week day at one pm, the square is the site of the apparition of the” Wizard of Christchurch”, an eccentric character, dressed as a wizard, who harangues the crowds on varied subjects. Colombo Street, the city’s main street, dissects Cathedral Square from north to south, however the more inviting strolls are to be had along the banks of the river Avon. Here it is possible to observe the strange flat bottomed boats (punts) which are propelled elegantly and silently, using a long pole pushed deep into the water. The river bank is also the site of Mona Vale, an elegant colonial house in Elizabethan style, complete with 5.5 hectares of gardens, rich in lakes and fountains. Christchurch also possesses the oldest casino in New Zealand. Open 24 hours a day, it is situated on the corner of Victoria and Kilmore Street. Buses provide the best means of getting around the city. The major routes are operated by Canride and leave from Cathedral Square. Fares vary depending upon the number of stops. The Shuttle is a free service which serves approximately 20 stops within the city centre, with departures every 10 minutes during the week between 8am and 7pm (until 9:30 pm Friday and Saturday and until 6pm on Sunday). City Circuits operates two routes which depart from Worcester St. and Oxford Terrace and call at the city’s tourist sights. [[[Christchurch - Not to be missed]]] Christchurch is also an important cultural centre( it is the only city in New Zealand to have two universities) and is the site of many interesting museums. The Canterbury Museum, situated in Rolleston Avenue, houses important sections on Maori civilisation, natural history( with a large stuffed bird display), an exhibition dedicated to the first European colonists and an interesting display regarding the exploration of Antarctica. The museum is open every day from 9am to 5:30 pm. The Robert McDougall Art Gallery is situated behind the Canterbury Museum, the building, open from 10am to 4:30pm, houses a vast collection of works of art by New Zealand and international artists. The Arts Centre, a complex consisting of numerous old Gothic buildings, was once the seat of Canterbury University and is now one of the major cultural tourist attractions of the city. The centre, dedicated to arts and crafts, is a lively place, frequented by craftsmen, musicians and street artists of all kinds. The complex houses numerous shops and workshops where craftsmen produce and sell a variety of products, including Maori pottery, cloth and jewellery. In addition the centre is also home to cinemas, theatres, musical concerts, bars and restaurants. [[[Christchurch - Walks and tours]]] Banks Peninsula, situated a short distance from Christchurch, is the site for many interesting excursions. This hilly peninsula, of volcanic origin, has a furrowed coastline with deep inlets and natural harbours, which radiate outwards from the centre, creating the image of a cogged- wheel. The most important town of the peninsula is Akaroa, a small historic town, which occupies the original site of the first French settlement in New Zealand. Akaroa, situated 82 km from Christchurch, recreates perfectly the atmosphere of a small French town, so much so that even the streets and houses, have maintained their original French names. The town is wonderful and strolling along the streets is a delightful experience. Mountain and winter sport lovers can head towards Arthur’s Pass, west of Christchurch. This 923 metre-high mountain pass, west of Christchurch, was discovered during the gold rush period,. The Arthur’s Pass National Park offers the possibility to undertake interesting hikes of varying lengths and difficulty. All of which offer an all-round view of the surrounding peaks, the highest being Mt Murchison at 2,400 metres. The Craigieburn Forest park, one of the best ski resorts in New Zealand, is located 42 km south of Arthur’s Pass. [[[Christchurch - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : NZ$ Electric supply: 230 V., 50 Hz., the Australian round, three pinned plug is used. Climate : Like many areas in New Zealand, Christchurch is particularly windy. The summer temperatures vary from a maximum of 22°C. to a minimum of 12° C., while in winter the maximum is 11°C and the minimum 4°C. Language : English, Maori Opening hours : offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 8 am to 5 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Friday from 9 am to 5:30 pm., and Saturday morning from 9 am to 1 pm. Once a week there is late night shopping (Thursday in the suburbs and Friday in the centre) until 9 pm. Telephones : The national code for Christchurch is 03. [[[Christchurch - A pocket guide]]] As can be imagined many English style pubs and restaurants adorn the city’s streets, even if during the last few years, many international pubs and restaurants have greatly widened the existing choice on offer. Some restaurants have chosen to combine the cuisine from two different countries such as New Zealand and Italy, thus creating a highly original menu. Those diners wishing to experience a romantic, candle-lit dinner, should head for the restaurants which line the banks of the river Avon. Many of Christchurch’s pubs and clubs offer after- dinner entertainment late into the night.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Queenstown Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Queenstown - Out and About]]] Queenstown, is located at over 1,000 metres above sea level, on the banks of Lake Wakatipu, in the Southern Alps and is considered one of the most beautiful locations in the whole of New Zealand. This small, compact town of 7, 500 inhabitants was initially known as “The Camp”, but its name was later changed in honour of Queen Victoria. The town was highly populated by gold prospectors during the 1860’s and in a relatively short time, became an active and vibrant mining town. Today Queensland is recognised as a first –rate holiday resort and has been dubbed the “world capital of adventure”. The area invests greatly in both summer and winter tourism and has highly developed structures to meet the tourist demand. Queensland has numerous pubs and clubs which guarantee the visitor a colourful and active night-life. Until recently Queensland was noted exclusively for its wonderful hiking possibilities and the ski pistes at the local Coronet Park. However from the 1970’s Queensland has developed a true vocation for adventure and extreme sports. Today it is possible to participate in a wide variety of activities including, tandem parachuting, canyoning, paragliding, bungee jumping, sledging, body boarding, not to mention the numerous water sports such as rafting and canoeing, which take place on the lake and the rivers Dart, Shotover and Karau. Bungee jumping is probably the favourite pastime for sports enthusiasts and there are numerous possibilities to take part. One of the preferred destinations is the 43metre- high Kawaru Suspension Bridge, situated 23km from the Queensland, but probably the most spectacular destination is the Skippers Suspension Bridge. This bridge, which crosses the narrow gorge of the Shotover River, is 71 metres high and offers a truly unique experience. The highest jump however, is from the Pipeline Bridge, a single arched bridge, that spans Skippers Canyon and stands at a height of 101 metres. The various rivers in the area, in particular the Kawarau and the Shotover, offer numerous possibilities to practise rafting. There are various grades of difficulty and to run certain stretches of the river, the minimum age is 12 or 13. The Queenstown Travel and Visitor Centre and the DOC, in Shotover Street, provide information and a booking service for the area’s activities. The centre of Queenstown, just a little larger than 1km2, is very easy to visit on foot. In order to travel further a field, it is possible to use the highly efficient local public transport service. The Shopper Bus provides a service from 6:30am to 11pm and calls at the main hotels, the airport, Sunshine Fernhill, Frankton, Remarkables Park Shopping Centre and Downtown Queensland. [[[Queenstown - Not to be missed]]] Bob’s Peak stands on the hill, overlooking the Queensland and provides the visitor with spectacular views over the town. The less energetic traveller can travel to the summit by means of the Skyline Gondola cable-car. The Kiwi and Birdlife Park is situated next to the cable-car station. This wonderful park houses amongst its pine trees, a refuge for kiwi’s and other birds on the road to extinction. The park is open every day from 9am to 5pm. Underwater World is a submerged observatory, located at the quayside at the end of the Mall, where visitors can glimpse the underwater life of the lake. The Queenstown Motor Museum, houses a collection of vintage cars and motorbikes. The museum is open every day from 9:30 am to 5.30 pm. [[[Queenstown - Walks and tours]]] The pretty village of Glenorchy, at the end of Lake Wakatipu, is an excellent departure point for various excursions , with trails and paths, which wind their way along the rivers Rees and Dart. The village, also the site of a small museum and golf course, is the departure point for those wishing to tackle the mountainous region, that stretches in a northerly direction, away from the lake. Interesting excursions along mountain trails include, Routeburn, Greenstone and the Caples. It is worth noting that the Routeburn trail is so popular, that it is not advisable to set off, without first booking accommodation at the mountain huts along the trail.. During the busy month of January, it is recommended to book at least one month in advance. [[[Queenstown - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : New Zealand dollar Electric supply: 230V, 50 Hz. Australian round three- pinned plugs are used Climate : Queensland is renown for its clean, limpid mountain air. The climate is rather changeable and visitors should bring warm clothes and a waterproof jacket at any time of the year. The summer temperature from November to February varies from 19°C to 29° C, in winter from °C to 10 °C Language : English, Maori Opening hours : offices are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm, while the banks are open from 9am to 4:30pm. The shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm and Saturday morning from 9am to 1pm. There is also late night shopping on Thursday or Friday until 9pm. Telephones : The national prefix is 03. [[[Queenstown - A pocket guide]]] Even though Queenstown is a small town, it has the possibility to satisfy the requests of even the most demanding of visitor. Those wishing to spend a relaxing evening can sit in one of the many quiet bars and swap stories with other travellers. The more energetic can head for the numerous nightclubs. Memorial Street is the site of a traditional Maori show, organized by the Maori Concert and Feast. There is a wide choice of menu in the numerous restaurants and it is recommended to sample the excellent local wine.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Rotorua Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Rotorua - Out and About]]] Rotorua, with its unique and fascinating geography, has been attracting visitors for more than one and half centuries and is one of the most important tourist resources for New Zealand. The town is located on the banks of Lake Rotorua, set deep in-land in the Bay of Plenty on New Zealand’s south Island. The town is nick-named “Sulphur City” due to the presence of numerous volcanoes, hot water springs, geysers and boiling mud pools. Upon arriving at Roturua, the visitor immediately finds himself in a place unlike any other, wisps of steam are evident everywhere, in the parks, paths and roads and the smell of sulphur in the air is an indication of what is to come. A few minutes from the town centre and geysers spurt from the ground and boiling mud gurgles at the visitors feet. The steam, rising from the ground, comes from underground lakes and rivers. The various minerals dissolved in the water, leave a kaleidoscope of colours and shades. The enormous volcanic peaks,now dormant, are a sign of this region’s turbulent past. The volcanic craters are now home to beautiful crystal-clear lakes. Whakarewarewa, situated 3km from the town on the banks of the river Puarenga, is the best place to admire this geothermal exhibition. Whakarewarewa boasts more than 500 hot springs and is the site of Pohutu, New Zealand’s largest geyser, which erupts on average, 15 times a day, reaching an altitude of 90 feet. In addition to the excellent natural characteristics of the area, the tourist development in Rotorua, owes much to the Maori culture and tradition, which had a large presence in this area, in particular during the 14th century. Rotorua’s Maori exhibitions are the most interesting and accessible in New Zealand. In addition the area of Rotorua, offers a wide variety of past-times, with more than 16 lakes, numerous rivers, mountains and canals, the possibility for adventure is uncountable. Kayaking, sailing and jet-skiing are among the most popular water sports in the area, with many visitors also opting for bungee jumping and hikes up the surrounding volcanoes. Those curious to try something new can have a go at “zorbing”, where upon being strapped into a inflated plastic ball, the thrill- seeker is launched down a 150 metre slope. Many private tour companies operate a service to transport visitors around the area. One of the most popular agencies is Pink Bus, which operates between Waiotapu and Waimangu. Information and a booking service are available at the Rotorua Tourism Office at 67 Fenton St. [[[Rotorua - Not to be missed]]] Lake Rotorua, of volcanic origin, is the largest of twelve lakes in the area. Various cruises are organized on the lake during the summer and depart from the quay at the far end of Tutanekai St. The Rotorua Museum of Art and History is testament to the importance of the Maori culture in this area. The museum,also known as Bath house, is located in Government gardens, in a Tudor style building dating back to 1908. The museum houses a collection dedicated to the Araw tribe, the first people to settle in the area, together with information and records of the devastating eruption of the Tarawera volcano in 1886 and an account of the legendary Second World War deeds of B Company of the 28th Maori Battalion. The museum is open from 9am to 6pm during the summer and from 9:30 am to 5pm during the winter. [[[Rotorua - Walks and tours]]] A twenty minute car journey from town and the visitor arrives at the departure point for an interesting trip through the Waimangu Volcanic Valley, an important thermal area, formed following the eruption of the Tarawera volcano in 1886. An easy walk takes the visitor to the Waimangu Cauldron, a volcanic lake with an average water temperature of 53°C. Continuing along the trail, the visitor arrives at Lake Rotomahana ( Hot lake), where it is possible to take a boat trip and explore the waters. Waimangu volcanic Valley is open all year round from 8:30 to 5pm. Visitors should not miss Tikitere, another area of volcanic activity, sometimes referred to as Hell’s Gate, this area is also the site of Kakahi Falls, the highest hot water falls in the Australian hemisphere. The falls are located approx 16km east of Rotorua, on the road to Whakatane.A 2.5km trail leads visitors through the area, passing other interesting sights on the way. The park is open every day from 8:30 to 5pm [[[Rotorua - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : New Zealand dollar Electric supply: 230V, 50 Hz. Australian round three- pinned plugs are used Climate : Rotorua enjoys a temperate climate less windy than other areas of new Zealand. The summer temperature from November to February varies from 20°C to 27° C, in winter from10 °C to 12 °C. The warmest months are January, February and March while the coldest are July and August. Language : English, Maori Opening hours : offices are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm, while the banks are open from 9am to 4:30pm. The shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm and Saturday morning from 9am to 1pm. There is also late night shopping on Thursday or Friday until 9pm. Telephones : to call Italy, dial 0039 followed by the area code without the initial zero and the private number of the person. To call from Italy to New Zealand dial 0064 followed by the area code without the initial zero and the private number of the person, The national prefix is 03. [[[Rotorua - A pocket guide]]] A vast and varied night life is offered in order that the visitor is not short of things to do after dusk. From traditional Maori shows to the numerous pubs and clubs,the choice is surprising given the proportions of the town. Visitors should not miss the opportunity to sample the local Maori cuisine, offered by many of Rotorua’s restaurants. There is also a wide range of restaurants offering an extensive choice of foreign foods.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>45</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Taupo Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Taupo - Out and About]]] Taupo is a quiet bathing resort on the banks of Lake Taupo, situated in the Central Plateau, in the heart of North Island. The area is a zone of intense volcanic activity, even if the most violent eruptions are just a mere memory and date back to over 2, 000 years ago. The volcanoes are however still active, but their destructive force has greatly reduced. In spite of this fact, they are still capable of offering the visitor wonderful , natural displays. Mt. Ruapehu is among one of the many volcanoes, whose eruptions produce vapour, ash and rock. Taupo is the main town in the area. Although for centuries the site of Maori tribes and visited for the first time by Europeans in 1840, the obstacles posed by nature, the poverty of the soil and the rigid cold winters, have been responsible for a development rate slower than in other areas of New Zealand. Only in the last ten years, thanks to an intensive hydro-electricity project, a bettering of agricultural methods and the establishment of an efficient road system, has Taupo seen real and consistent growth. At the same time Taupo has experienced the rewards of such physical and financial investment, growing to become a leading tourist attraction in the area. Today Taupo is the capital of the trout fishing world, thanks to the presence of the largest still-water lake in the Australian hemisphere. The lake is home to trout of extraordinary proportions. For the thrill-seekers Taupo does not lack the possibility of practising adventure and extreme sports including rafting, bungee jumping, paragliding and tandem skydiving. It is necessary to note that even though the town is of relatively small dimensions, a true public transport system doesn’t exist. Two taxi companies, together with a shuttle service, operate a service between the area’s main sights, at a reasonable price. [[[Taupo - Not to be missed]]] The principle attractions of the area are found outside Taupo. In the town however, apart from the view of the volcanoes, which rise up beyond the lake, it is possible to visit the Regional Museum and Art Gallery, situated in Story Place. The museum, which houses displays detailing the history of the zone ,is open every day from 10.30am to 4.30pm. The Spa Dinosaur Valley, is located in Spa Road and is a New Zealand version of Jurassic Park, complete with enormous concrete dinosaurs. It is possible to visit thermal spas, situated close, including the AC Baths in Spa road, or the Taupo Hot Springs, located along the Taupo- Napier highway, about 1km from the lake. In these complexes it is possible to enjoy a wide choice of hot water baths, private thermal baths, saunas, and massages and spend a whole day dedicated to your personal well-being. The Spas are open every day from 8am to 9pm. [[[Taupo - Walks and tours]]] One of the finest and most interesting areas of geothermal activity in New Zealand, is without a doubt, Orakei Korako, situated between Taupo and Rotorua, at a distance of 25km from the town. The park, famous above all, for its silica terraces, also offers the visitor a host of geysers, boiling mud pools and hot springs. The park houses the Ruatapu Cave, a magnificent natural cave containing a small jade-green lake. It is thought that the ancient Maoris used the water as a mirror when participating in the tribe’s various ceremonies, in which dressing of the hair was an important ritual. [[[Taupo - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : New Zealand dollar Electric supply: 230V, 50 Hz. Australian round three- pinned plugs are used Climate : In spite of the fact that Taupo has a temperate climate, the zone is rather windy and cold, when compared with other areas in North Island The summer temperature from November to February varies from 10°C to 25° C, in winter from -3 °C to 12 °C. The warmest months are January, February and March, while the coldest are July and August. Language : English Opening hours : offices are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm, while the banks are open from 9am to 4:30pm. The shops are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30 pm and Saturday morning from 9am to 1pm. There is also late night shopping on Thursday or Friday until 9pm. Telephones : The prefix for Taupo is 07. [[[Taupo - A pocket guide]]] Although the main reason to visit Taupo, is undoubtedly to enjoy what’s on offer during the day, the town does not lack in possibilities to pass an enjoyable evening. There is a wide choice of restaurants, offering an international menu together with the local cuisine.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>46</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Wellington Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Wellington - Out and About]]] Wellington, the second largest city in New Zealand, is situated in a natural harbour, facing the Cook Straits, at the extreme southern tip of North Island. The city is the site of the administrative, financial and cultural centre of New Zealand. The city owes its development primarily to its port, the island’s second largest after Auckland. The port creates notable commercial traffic and has rail links to the principle cities on North Island. Founded in 1840, the city became the capital in 1865. From 1870 and throughout the 19th century, Wellington underwent rapid urban growth, in particular in a northerly direction along the Hutt River valley. Surrounded by green hills, Wellington has a modern and cosmopolitan feel, characterised by wide streets and neat, well kept gardens. A city of multiple personalities and ethnic groups, Wellington can be sophisticated, like other large cities and at the same time simple, like a small village. The best way to explore this lively city is on foot. It is possible to walk the length of Downtown Wellington in under 30 minutes and thereby experience the different districts that make up the city:the calmness of Lambton District, the intellectualism of Willis District and the desire to entertain of the Courtenay District. Wellington’s cosmopolitan feel is also evident in the city’s culinary art .The air is often full of mouth-watering aromas, that entice the passing visitor to enter one of the numerous ethnic restaurants that decorate the city. Lambton Quay is Wellington’s main street and runs parallel to the seafront. Oriental Parade is the site for many residents wishing to take a leisurely stroll, but the true heart of the city is the so called “Miracle Mile”, that stretches from the railway station to Cambridge and Kent Terraces. The historic part of the city is Thorndon, situated a little further to the north. To gain a different perspective of the city, visitors are advised to take a trip around the port by boat, or catch a ferry to Eastbourne. A ride on the cable-car is also highly recommended. The cable-car leaves the dock at Lambton Quay and arrives at Kelburn. The service operates from 7am to 10pm Monday to Friday and from 9am to 10pm on Saturday and Sunday. The cable-car, which leaves every ten minutes, takes visitors to the top of the hill, where it is possible to admire a spectacular view over the city and the port. Those not wishing to ride down, can return on foot through the Botanic Gardens, famous for the Lady Norwood Rose Garden, which houses over 100 different types of roses. Another fine view of the city can be had from the view point on the top of Mt. Victoria. The hike to the top can be strenuous but is well worth the effort. For the less energetic, it is possible to catch a bus, which departs from the railway station. In spite of the modern constructions, which have greatly changed the city’s aspect, Wellington has managed to maintain various historic sites and buildings including: Antrim House, Old St. Paul’s Cathedral, Katharine Mansfield’s birthplace, the Parliament building and many city houses, precariously perched on the surrounding hills. Welington has a first-rate public transport system. Thebuses and the trolley buses are the best way to travel around the city. Stagecoach Wellington operates the most extensive transport system in the city centre. A day ticket costs NZ$5, and allows unlimited travel for an entire day. The railway station is situated right in the centre of the city, thus providing an efficient means of travel, in particular to destinations such as Kapiti Coast and the suburbs of Hutt Valley. Tranz Metro operates four lines, with departures every 30 minutes during the day ( every 10/20 minutes during rush hour) and every hour on Saturday. Boat transport is operated by Westpac trust, which handles ferries from Queen’s Wharf to Days Bay and certain islands. [[[Wellington - Not to be missed]]] Parliament, in Boweb St. is a three-building complex and includes the “Beehive”, the architectural symbol of Wellington and site of the minister’s offices. The other buildings in the complex are the Old Parliamentary Building and the Parliamentary Library. Tours of the buildings are organised daily from 10am to 4pm. Visits are recommended to visit both the Gothic, Old St. Paul Cathedral and the birth-place of Katherine Mansfield, New Zealand’s most important female writer. The building stands at N° 25 Tinakori Rd and houses a display that details the life and work of this world famous author. The house is open every day from 10am to 4pm ( Monday until 2:30pm) The Te Papa (Museum of New Zealand) deserves a mention. This modern, immense complex with its daring architecture, is situated in Cable St. and houses an important collection of Maori artefacts . [[[Wellington - Walks and tours]]] The extensive stretch of white sand along Kapiti Coast, is an easy–to-reach destination for a pleasant stroll, away from the city. Kaptit Coast is very well organised and offers the possibility of practising all types of water-sports. The main centre Paraparaumu, with Paraparaumu and Raumati beach, is the most popular tourist destination in this zone. Kapiti Island stands a little way off shore and can only be visited with permission. Access to this important flower and wildlife reserve is limited to 50 people per day. Simple walks, or expert hikes can be organised in the Tararua Forest Park, which lies further inland. The park, which contains virgin forests and mountain streams, is well equipped with pic-nic areas, bathing zones and camping. [[[Wellington - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : NZ$ Electric suply: 230 V., 50 Hz., the Australian round, three pinned plug is used. Climate : A climatic condition, particular to Wellington, is strong winds, which often blow especially during the days at the beginning of winter. The city, however, generally enjoys a temperate coastal climate with mild and often sunny winters. The hours of sunlight are more numerous here than in Auckland. The average summer temperature is 20.3° C, in winter 11.2°C. Language : English, Maori Opening hours : offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 9 am to 5 pm. Government offices are open from Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am. to 4:30 pm. Shops are open from Monday to Friday from 9 am to 5 pm., and Saturday morning from 9 am to 12:30 pm. Once a week there is late night shopping (Thursday or Friday) until 9 pm. Telephones : The national code for Wellington is 04. [[[Wellington - A pocket guide]]] Wellington’s large number of ethnic groups is evident in the vast assortment of restaurants present within the city. The local cuisine is also well represented, together with that of Europe, the Middle East and Tex-Mex. Restaurants are located throughout the city, with the highest concentration being situated in Courtney Place, Cuba St. Oriental Parade and in the zone, which runs from Manners Mall to Willis St. Cuba Street is also home to numerous cafés, many of which are frequented by local artists.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>47</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Belfast Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Belfast - Out and About]]] The city of Belfast (Béal Feirste, mouth of the sand bank) is the capital of Northern Ireland. Located on an inlet, the city lies on a plain, crossed by the river Lagan. Belfast is laid out like a chess-board, with Belfast Lough and the surrounding area, neatly divided up by the city’s main streets. The city’s urban area is extensive and stretches for a radius of over 30km around the city centre. A visit to Belfast should start from Donegall Place, which winds its way north of Donegall Square, changing its name on the way to Royal Avenue.The roads, in this area, are the liveliest in the city and contain the finest examples of Belfast’s monuments. The area surrounding Donegall Square is one continuous display of beautiful and elegant buildings, including the Scottish Provident Building, with its statues of sphinxes, dolphins and lions’ heads. Queen’s College and Queen’s University stand one km to the south of Donegall Square. The University is home to 8,000 students and is the most prestigious in Northern Ireland, renown for its scientific studies. The refined Botanic Gardens, with its Palm House in cast iron and glass and its Tropical Ravine, a jungle environment, populated by tortoises, is located only a short distance away to the south. The adjacent University Square, is lined by one of the finest examples of terraced houses in all of Ireland. The zone houses many cafés, which are well hidden among the tree-lined streets and are always full of students. The imposing Neo-Renaissance City Hall dominates Donegall Square. A tangled web of narrow streets branch off from the High Street and Ann Street. These streets, called the Entries, are all that remain of the old district of Belfast. The lively zone is full of atmosphere, with its old pubs including White’s Tavern, dating back to 1630 and the Morning Star and Globe Tavern, famous for their cooking. Cathedral Quarter, closeby, has been transformed from a zone of old warehouses in decay, into a fashionable area with restaurants and bars. The surrounding area has a number of noteworthy buildings, in particular the Ulster Bank (1860), complete with cast iron lamps and columns and sculptures which bear the Red Hand of Ulster, symbol of the province. Malone house, built around 1820, is a fine example of Belfast’s Georgian Architecture. Higgin Gallery houses many painting exhibitions, has a fine restaurant and its gardens, planted with rhododendrons and azaleas, have numerous paths leading through them, connecting to the Lagan Towpath. The gardens border the wood and fields at the river’s edge, in the Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park. Visiting West Belfast, separated from the heart of the city by the Westlink motorway, the visitor is transported back to a time when West Belfast was the fulcrum of the city’s linen industry. Today the zone is home to an almost entirely Catholic population. There is hardly a trace of the large blocks of flats or terraced worker’s houses destroyed during the struggles between the Catholics and Protestants. The murals have however survived, these paintings depict the history of the struggle between these two factions. Probably the most famous of the murals is the one dedicated to the hunger-striker Bobby Sands, located close to the seat of Sinn Féin. Other murals have Celtic, religious and historical themes including the potato famine and the various cease-fires and treaties. The Protestant murals are centered around the Shankhill Road, and have a military theme. The first mural example dates back to 1908 and portrays King William of Orange on his white horse. The icons of today's murals, are the members of the Ulster Defence Organisation and the Derry apprentices who barred the city gates in 1688. The best way to visit the centre of Belfast is on foot. Destinations further away can be reached by the excellent Citybus service, which covers 60 routes. Tickets and timetables are available from newsagents and the Citybus kiosk in Donegall Square West. [[[Belfast - Not to be missed]]] The highly informative Ulster Museum is located a short distance away from the Palm house. The museum houses displays giving little- known information about the ancient history of Ireland, its linen and glass industry, relics of large industrial machines and Irish painters, not to mention the sumptuous gold and jewels discovered amongst the wreckage of a Spanish galleon, belonging to the Spanish Armada, shipwrecked in 1588. The museum’s gardens are shared by Queen’s College. The gardens, built in Tudor style in 1849, imitate the gardens to be found at Magdalen College in Oxford. Entrance is free and visitors can reach the museum by catching either bus N°69 or 71. The city’s many tranquil tree-lined streets, are home to numerous bars frequented by Belfast’s students. Belfast is surrounded by hills, which can be seen from the city centre. The highest of which is Cave Hill (355m), from where it is possible to admire a splendid view of the city. The County Park covers an area of 33 hectares and stretches as far as Belfast Lough. The park houses numerous ruins of Iron-Age forts. Nearby, there are five man-made caves, that date back to the Neolithic period. Descending Cave hill, the visitor arrives at Belfast Castle, a Scottish Baronial construction from 1870, now used to host fashionable Belfast weddings. Belfast zoo, at the foot of Cave Hill, offers a splendid view of Belfast Lough and houses fine animal enclosures, in particular the seal and penguin displays. [[[Belfast - Walks and tours]]] The Giant’s Ring is situated at County Down, 8km from Belfast. These immense prehistoric earthworks, with a diameter of almost 200m and a surface area of 3 hectares, houses a 4000 year old Druid’s tomb at its centre. In the 17th century horse races were organised in this area, taking advantage of the natural potential provided by the 4 metre high earth ring. [[[Belfast - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : English pound, sub-divided into 100 pence Electric supply: the standard supply is 220 volts AC in the Republic of Ireland and 240 volts AC in Northern Ireland(50 cycles). The use of an adaptor may be necessary. Climate : the climate is mild and rainy. In January the average temperature is 7-8°C. The summer temperatures are around 14-15°C Language : Irish and English Opening hours : shops are open Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm, with the larger shopping centres staying open on Thursday until 8/9pm. On Sundays the large supermarkets and shops are open from 12 until 5/6pm. Pubs are open from Monday to Saturday from 11am to 11pm and Sunday from 12 until 12pm. The banks are open from 9:30am to 4:30 pm from Monday to Friday and many remain open until 5pm on Thursdays. Telephones: to call Northern Ireland from abroad it is necessary to dial the international code ++ 44 followed by the area code without the initial zero and the number. To telephone abroad from Northern Ireland, first dial the prefix 028. Ireland is on Greenwich time and is in accordance with British summer time, the clocks are put one hour ahead during th middle of March and back by one hour at the end of October. [[[Belfast - A pocket guide]]] Belfast’s night life is lively and animated. The pub culture is very evident and plays a strong part in the life of the city, offering a meeting point to converse, listen to music and to be entertained.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>48</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Oslo Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Oslo - Out and About]]] Oslo is situated at the tip of Oslofjord, an inlet of the Skagerrak, free of ice for the duration of the year. Destroyed in a fire in 1624, Oslo was completely rebuilt on the orders of King Christian IV, who gave the city its regular layout. From that moment, Oslo saw the creation of new districts radiating out from the city centre, complete with neat and orderly road systems. It was during the period 1818-44, that the face of the city radically changed, with the construction of public offices, Parliament,universities, the stock exchange, banks and museums. Oslo is an easy city to visit, given that the major sights are either located in the city centre or are easy to reach using public transport or by bicycle. 18th century Oslo is situated around Karl Johann Gate, a pedestrianized street and the city's main thoroughfare. The street runs from east to west,connecting central station with the Royal Palace and passing Parliament, the university, the student's gardens, the cathedral, central square, the National Theatre and the Town Hall, an important symbol of the tourist port of Pipervika. The port and its quays are the departure point for the ferries to Bygdoy and the boats and yachts, which leave to explore the fjords and islands. The port is also the site of Aker Brigge, where old quays and warehouses have been converted into the residential commercial centre; Festplassen. this centre contains theatres, cinemas, shops and crowded bars. The most elegant part of the city is to be found west of the Royal Palace. An area of 18th century nobility and upper class. The rich quadrangle, which runs from Parkveien to Bygdoy Allé and from Kirkeveien to Uranienborveinen is the site of boutiques, embassies, the Frogner Park and the Oslo Bymuseum, which holds exhibitions on the theme of the history of the city. Holmenkellen, the city's most exclusive district, lies at an altitude of 420m, on the high ground, behind the centre of Oslo. Holmkollen, is Norway's answer to skiing and is the sight of an impressive ski-jump. The ramp is 60m high and finishes with a circular stadium, capable of accommodating 10, 000 spectators. Every year, during the month of March, the city hosts the Ski Festival. Lake Beserud and the Observation tower stand in front of the ski ramp. The base of the tower is home to the Ski Museum. Purchasing an Oslo Card from Central station in Jerbanetorget 2, allows the visitor to travel free of charge on Oslo's public transport system and in addition allows free parking in council car parks, free admission to the city's museums, swimming pools, Tusenfryd amusement park and mini sight-seeing cruise. Central station is also the location of Trafikanten, the information office which provides details on all the city's public transport. Oslo has 5 tram lines, which cross the city, 20 bus routes, with arrival and departure from Busterminalen and eight metro lines, which depart from Parliament Square (Stortinget), four from Majorstuen station towards the east of the city and four from Toeyen station which head to the east. [[[Oslo - Not to be missed]]] Vigelandpark, a wonderful natural area of lakes and trees is dominated by the sculptures of the famous artist Gustav Vigeland, detailing the life and death of this talented person. Akershus, a 13th century fortress, dominates the port. The fortress has a marvellous interior containing stately rooms, an underground prison, and a chapel, still used for royal ceremonies, an home to the cypts of Hakon VII and Olav V. the building also houses the Resistence Museum, which details the German occupation of the country and Norway's fight to defeat this enemy. The Fortess is surrounded by beautiful gardens, which provide a fine view over the city. The city has many museums including The Nasjonal Galeriet, founded in 1837 and housing documentation about the Norwegian painters of the 18th and 19th century. The Kommenes Kunstsamlinger Munch-museet, houses a collection of 1100 paintings, 4,500 designs, 1,800 prints, sculptures, letters and books left to the city by Munch upon his death. The Museum of adventure at Bygoy, houses artefacts that detail Norwegian adventure including Viking longboats and the remains of the Oseberg boat (IX century) rich in ornamental and marine sculptures; Fram, the boat much loved by Nansen and Amundsen; and the Kon -Tiki, the fragile raft used by the anthropologist Heyerdahlt, during his ocean expeditions. [[[Oslo - Walks and tours]]] Marka, whose main access point is Frognerstern, is an immense forest that surrounds Oslo. The zone covers a surface area of 1,700 square kilometres and contains spruce, birch and pine trees set amongst hills and valleys, streams and lakes. The forest has strategically placed chalets throughout the area, which allow rest and repose for the weary traveller. Visitors can take a cruise on one of the boats, that departs from both Vippetangen and Aker Brygge, in order to visit the fjords and enter the maze of small islands that make up the archipelago. [[[Oslo - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Euro Electric supply: 220 Volts A.C Norwegian plugs are round two pinned( not earthed ) Climate : the west coast, exposed to the influences of the Gulf currents, has a rather mild climate during winter. Rainfall is abundant in particular from September to December. Oslo is less cold than other regions but the sky is usually covered and rainfall is frequent Opening hours : post offices are open from 8:30 to 4pm during week days and from 8am to 1pm on Saturdays. Shops are open from 9am to 4pm , except Thursdays, when they are open until 6pm. Many supermarkets are open until 8 or 9pm and until 6pm on Saturdays. Some kiosks and newsagents remain open until 10/11pm. There are kiosks located near petrol stations, which stay open until 11pm or are open throughout the day. [[[Oslo - A pocket guide]]] Aker Brygge is one of the liveliest areas in the centre. This zone of the old port was completely restructured a few years ago. Karl Johans Gate, the city's main street, is also rich in bars and pubs. This pedestrianized area is also home to boutiques and meeting points for the city's artists and street bands. The Grunerlokka district, located outside the city centre is home to many fashionable restaurants, popular with students and the young. The Oslo Snow Festival, held every February, takes place in Frogner Park and sees magnificent sculptures in snow and ice. Sommer pa Akerhus Festning, at the Akerhus Fortress, is an all summer long festival of theatre and music. The Oslo Jazz Festival takes place in August, with concerts in the park, squares and cafés.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>49</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Edinburgh Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Edinburgh - Out and About]]] Edinburgh, a city with a historic centre containing Medieval and Georgian buildings, is dominated by the cliffs of Arthur’s Seat to the south and Carlton Hill to the north .Edinburgh represents Scotland’s cultural, historical and artistic centre and has the largest concentration of monuments, after the city of London. The geography of the surrounding area, consisting of hills and valleys, has played an important part in shaping the city and giving Edinburgh its unusual and interesting form. The city is divided into two large areas, separated by Princes Street. Princes Street, the city’s main street, is one mile long and lined with hotels, shops and interesting public and private offices. The two zones of the city are linked by the valley area, site of Princes Street Gardens. The Old Town, enclosed by the city walls, is situated between the castle and the Palace of Holyrood. This area contains the major part of Edinburgh’s Medieval historical centre. The area is tightly compacted around 66 small lanes which branch off the two main streets of the zone Grassmarket and the Royal Mile. The Royal Mile is a long street, divided into four parts and runs from Castle Hill to Canongate, proceeding along Lawnmarket, the High Street and finishing in front of the Palace of Holyrood. Strolling along this street, the visitor has the opportunity to visit some of the city’s interesting buildings including Lady Stair’s House, a 17th century building, which houses a display on the life and work of Burns, Scott and Stevenson and the 15th century St. Giles Cathedral, the city’s main church complete with the ornate, Gothic style Thistle Chapel. The High Street, the most important stretch of the Royal Mile, is rich in Scottish tradition and home to both Parliament House, a Italian style building from 1630, now seat of the court of justice and the Museum of Childhood. The 15th century residence of the reformer John Knox is situated in front of the Museum of Childhood. Canongate, the last stretch of the Royal Mile, is the longest and was once an independent district of the city, owned by bishops of the Holyrood Abbey .Beyond Marocco’s land, the road continues until the extreme east of the Royal Mile and the site of the Holyrood Palace, which today is the official Scottish residence of the Queen of England. New Town, to the north, spreads beyond the city walls and has the typical architectural features of an 18th century town, evident in the uniformity of its noble Georgian- fronted buildings, with large squares and immense gardens. George Street, which runs parallel to Princes Street, is one of Edinburgh’s most elegant streets and the site of the Assembly Rooms, the Music Hall and St. Andrew, the first church built in New Town. Queen Street is the city’s most renown residential district and is lined with 18th and 19th century offices and buildings, with elegant side-streets and round squares. Georgian House, in the heart of New Town, looks onto Charlotte Street. This excellent example of Georgian Architecture possesses original furniture from the same period. The house can be visited every day from April to October. Queen Street is also the site of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, which contains portraits of famous people born in Scotland, from the 16th century up to the present time. The Episcopal Cathedral of St. Mary is located at the end of Melville Street in the western part of New Town. The cathedral is one of the largest buildings in Great Britain. Edinburgh has two universities. The one built in 1582, is renown for its faculty of medicine. The city possesses neither a metropolitan transport system, nor a tram service. The public transport system is based on the use of buses. Lothian Buses and First Edinburgh, operate the service in and around the city. Given that it is forbidden to park a car in the centre of Edinburgh, the buses circulate easily and quickly. Weekly and daily travelcards exist at a reduced price and permit travel on all routes. Driving and parking in Edinburgh is a problem, and parking space is very limited, with certain zones requiring resident permits. It is therefore advisable to use one of the NCP car parks, such as the one in St. James Centre or that in Casle Terrace, or the Waverly Car Park in New Street. [[[Edinburgh - Not to be missed]]] The castle stands on a basalt mound of volcanic origin. Beautiful and romantic, the castle complex comprises buildings dating from the 12th to the 20th century and reflect the various roles the castle has played: fortress, military prison and royal palace. It was the royal residence until the union of the crown in 1603, when the King established his London residence. The castle is the birthplace of James VI, son of Mary Queen of Scots, and houses the ensigns of the Scottish royal family. Today the building functions as the official seat of the Royal Scots Regiment and houses the War Museum and the Army Museum. The castle is open every day, from April to September, from 9:30 am to 5pm. The National Gallery of Scotland, one of the richest picture-galleries in Europe, is situated in The Mound and houses works from such important artists as: Rubens, Holbein, Tiziano, Raffaello, Tintoretto, the French impressionists and the British Ramsay, Reynolds and Gainsborough. The building is open every day from 10am to 5pm. The National Gallery of Modern Art is located in Belford Road and houses fine examples of European and American art from the 20th century, including works from Magritte, Lichenstein and Moore. The gallery is open every day from 10am to 5pm. [[[Edinburgh - Walks and tours]]] The Scottish Border Tour, 50km long, is dotted with the ruins of ancient buildings and abbeys from the 12th century. The Tour stops off in Berwick-Upon-Tweed, Kelso, Jedburgh, Tweed and Melrose. The lush hilly region, south of Edinburgh, has the river Tweed running through it and is referred to as the Land of Scott. For it was here, that the writer Walter Scott, built Abbotsford House and Galashiles and where he spent the last years of his life. Visitors can view the house’s study, library and Knight’s Room. The house is open every day, from March to October. The interesting ruins of Dryburgh Abbey, stand on the banks of the river Tweed. The abbey, which dates back to 1150, is the site of Walter Scotts resting place.. The ruins of Melrose Abbey, occupy a wonderful position, at the foot of the Tweed valley. The outline of the cloisters, the outer structure of the church and the medieval sculptures are all that remain of the building, founded in the 12th century by Cistercian monks. The Pentland Hills lie 26 km south west of Edinburgh and are an ideal location for hiking along the many well-signposted paths. At Hillend it is possible to take a chair lift to the top of the 490 metre- high Allermuir. [[[Edinburgh - The traveller's notebook]]] Electric supply: 220 Volts/250 Volts. Climate : the best months to visit Edinburgh are May and June and the period from the beginning of September to the end of October Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm. The post offices are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5.30pm [[[Edinburgh - A pocket guide]]] For three weeks, during the month of August, Edinburgh hosts the Edinburgh Festival. A festival of international music and drama, which sees important presentations in the field of theatre, dance and opera. Edinburgh also hosts the Fringe Festival, an alternative arts festival. The castle grounds are the site for the Edinburgh Tattoo, a military exhibition with marching bands and Scottish bagpipers. The city offers interesting night-life throughout the year. The Tourism Office in Prince Street, handles booking for the various exhibitions and shows. Traditional Scottish evenings are organised in the lounges of the King James Hotel, Scandic Crown Hotel and the Carlton Highland Hotel. Edinburgh is home to over 700 bars and pubs. Many of the restaurants and eating places along the Royal Mile offer low priced meals.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>50</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Inverness Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Inverness - Out and About]]] Inverness, a commercial and tourist city, is situated at the mouth of the river Ness in the Moray Firth (North Sea) and forms the gateway to the Scottish Highlands. Church Street, Inverness’ main street runs parallel to the river Ness and is lined by numerous 17th and 18th Century buildings, built using, the local red granite. Albertarff House, built in 1593, is situated at N° 71 Church street and houses an exhibition on the Gaelic language. The medieval houses,Market Cross, the Town house, the Museum and Art Gallery, contain displays of artefacts and folklore from the Highlands. The superb Neogothic Saint Andrew’s Cathedral, with its smooth marble columns, stands in a park in Ness Walk, on the opposite bank of the river. Both Ness Walk and Ness Bank offer possibilities for leisurely strolls along the river, while admiring the houses which line the bank and the Cathedral which dominates the skyline. Inverness, being a small compact city, is very easy to travel around. A large majority of city’s attractions, restaurants and pubs are located in the centre and are therefore easy to reach on foot. The bus is the ideal means to reach the sites and attractions located outside the city such as: Loch Ness and the Culloden Battlefield. [[[Inverness - Not to be missed]]] Cawdor Castle is situated 12km north-east of the city at Clephanton on the B9006. The castle was built in 1835, on the site of the old castle, where tradition has it, Macbeth murdered Duncan, the King Of Scotland. The castle comprises a central quadrangle tower and is surrounded by a moat with fully working drawbridge. The castle’s Drawing Room, houses paintings,Italian sculptures and Flemish tapestries. The grounds contain an excellent botanical garden. The Inverness Museum and Art Gallery, located in Castle Wynd, has an interesting display of ancient and contemporary art and provides explanations in Gaelic. Balnain House, in Huntky street, is the site of the Highlands Music Centre, where it is possible to play various Scottish musical instruments, while sampling some of the specialities of the scottish cuisine. The Flora Macdonald’s monument stands at the top of Castle Hill. The monument is dedicated to the woman, who saved Prince Charles Edward Stewart, helping him to escape after his defeat at the battle of Culloden. [[[Inverness - Walks and tours]]] Scotland’s finest town are all located within easy reach of Inverness. It is possible to visit Culloden, located 8km from the city along the B9006. Culloden is the site of the famous 1747 battle between the Scots, lead by Bonnie Prince Charlie and the English troops. This battle saw the annexing of Scotland with the United Kingdom. Clava Cairn and the Standing Stones, located 3km away, is the site of a burial mound, which dates back to the last Scottish bronze age. The deep waters of the famous Loch Ness, are located a short distance from the city. The Official Loch Ness Monster Exhibition Centre in Drumnadrochit, provides detailed information about the renown monster. The ruins of Urquhart Castle occupy a magnificent setting on the banks of the Loch. The castle,built during the reign of Edward I and given to John Grant of Freuchie by James IV in 1509, was destroyed in 1692, to avoid it falling into the hands of the Jacobites. The pretty town of Beauly, stands to the west of Inverness, on the banks of the Beauly Firth and is home to the riuns of an abbey dating back to 1230. Using Beauly as the departure point, it is possible to do a day tour to visit Glen Affric, one of the most beautiful Scottish Valleys. Dufftown is the departure point for the famous Malt Whisky Trail, which takes in the most important malt whisky distilleries, including Glennfiddich at Dufftown, where during the course of a guided tour, it is possible to see the production of this famous spirit; Glenlivet in Ballindalloch; Glen Grant in Rothes, Tamnavulin; Glenfarclas; Tamdhu and Strathisla. The distilleries are open to the public every weekday from 9:30 to 4.30pm. Glenfiddich is also open Saturday from 9:30am to 4:30pm and Sunday from 12 to 4.30pm [[[Inverness - The traveller's notebook]]] Electric supply: 220 Volts/250 Volts. Necessitates the use of an adaptor Climate : the best months to visit Inverness are May to September. April and October are acceptable. In winter it is advisable to avoid the Highlands. Opening hours : Shops are open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 4pm. The post offices are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5.30pm [[[Inverness - A pocket guide]]] Inverness offers a wide choice of shops offering Scottish products: The Scottish Swater Store at N° 9 Drummond Street, Duncan Chisholm and Sons Ltd at N° 47 Castle Street and for fine wool products, the Holm Woolen Mills.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>51</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Cape Town Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Cape Town - Out and About]]] Cape Town, county town of Western Cape Province, is situated in one of the most beautiful bays in the world. 70 km from The Cape of Good Hope. It is, geographically, one of the most isolated capital cities in the world. The city, dominated by Table Mountain, a 1000 metre high flat top mountain, is set in the middle of a region rich in mountain paths, vineyards and warm beaches. Founded in 1652 by Jan Van Riebeek, who was appointed by the East India Company to establish a landing and refuelling area for passing ships. The city remained under Dutch control until 1806, when it was handed over to Great Britain. Until the 19th century and the construction of The Suez Canal, Cape Town was an important refuelling centre for those ships rounding The Cape of Good Hope. From 1910 until 1961, the city was the legislative capital of the South African Union and is now the capital of the present day South Africa. At first glance Cape Town can seem remarkably small. The centre is situated to the north of Table Mountain and to the east of Signal Hill and the old city districts are all within walking distance. The entire zone lies in within a basin , its borders being defined by the steep sides of the mountain. The main residential districts, inhabited by white people, stretch from the North-East to the South of the city, while the black residents, mainly live in The Townships, which are located in the barren and sandy plains to the east. The spectacular Cape Of Good Hope is located 70km south of the city centre. The Cape’s wonderful local flora is protected by The Cape Of Good Hope Nature Reserve. The city centre(city bowl) is small and therefore possible to visit on foot. Start from “The Castle,” the oldest building in the city and continue on to the impressive council building, taking in: The Grote Kerk (The Dutch Protestant Mother Church), Green Market Squrae, The Cultural History Museum, The Parliament Building and The South African Museum. The most wide-spread architectural style is “Cape Dutch”, even though it doesn’t have any direct links with the true Dutch style, it is possible to notice some shared characteristics. The public transport system is not very well developed. There is a bus terminal at Grand Parade, an old military parade ground at the side of the Castle Of Good Hope, where it is possible to find mini-buses, which provide a cheap taxi service. In order to arrive at Table Mountain cable-car station or The Waterfront, catch the bus that leaves from either in front of OK Bazaar in Adderley Street, or from Seapoint, near the Hard Rock Café. [[[Cape Town - Not to be missed]]] A visit to Cape town would not be complete without a trip to Table Mountain. This massive block, consisting of horizontal layers of sandstone, dominates the city. The summit is easily reachable by cable-car, or the more ambitious, can scale the mountain on foot. The Botanical Gardens are situated on the eastern slopes of Table Mountain. The Gardens, open to the public all week, cover an area of 560 acres, and illustrate the region’s flora at its best. The South Africa Museum is the oldest and most interesting museum in South Africa. It houses realistic reconstructions of there communal life of the ancient San people, constructed using plaster casts of actual people taken in 1911. Additional displays include objects belonging to other indigenous cultures.T he Museum is open every day, from 10am to 5pm. The Castle Of Good Hope was built between 1666 and 1679, close to the site where originally an old fort with mud walls had stood. Its impressive 10 metre-high walls have never had to fend off an attack. Even today it hosts the Head Quarters of the military command, but visitors are more than welcome. The Castle contains two museums which display furniture and paintings depicting Cape Town’s past. [[[Cape Town - Walks and tours]]] Not to be missed is the trip to The Cape Of Good Hope, the extreme southern point of a 100 km strip of land. The journey winds along the M4, following steep mountain roads that link together bays, wide beaches, small villages and fishing communities. A short detour leads to The Cape Of Good Hope Nature Reserve, an institute set up to safeguard the rare floral species of this area, which includes the “ Protea” the flower symbol of South Africa Another pleasant trip leads along “the wine route” towards Stellembosch, Franschoek and Paarl. The wine-making industry represents one of the principle riches of the area and many vineyards are open to the public for visits and tastings. [[[Cape Town - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : South African Rand Electric supply: 220-230 volts, necessitates the use of an adaptor Climate : Mediterranean. In Summer (Dec-Mar) varies from 20-28°C, in Winter (Jun-Aug) from 7- 18°C Language : Afikaans, English, Zulu, Shoni Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday,from 9am to 5.30pm. The shops from 8 am to 5pm and on Saturday ,from 8am to 1pm, shopping centres until 9pm Telephones : The public telephones ,in the post office function 24 hours a day. There are also many private telephone centres, where it is possible to phone and send faxes. [[[Cape Town - A pocket guide]]] Cape Town is perhaps the safest city in South Africa, however it is advisable not to wander the streets after dusk, to avoid isolated areas and where possible to stay within a group. The best and most secure place for those who like the night-life, is The Waterfront, a promenade full of atmosphere with restaurants, bars and clubs offering live music. The Green Dolphin is a busy restaurant, that offers live jazz music in the evenings. The Mussel-Craker Oyster Bar, offers fine fish based meals. One of the cheaper proposals is the Ferryman’s Tavern, where it is possible to eat a light meal accompanied by a range of recently brewed beers. The “Spur” chain restaurants offer quality tex-mex meals at very reasonable prices. An alternative choice could be an evening of classical music in The Nico Malan Complex. Situated on the coast, it hosts classical dance shows, operas and traditional theatre plays, at prices much lower than those in Europe. Shop lovers should visit Cavendish Mall at the end of Protea Road, the most elegant shopping centre in the city. Long Street is bustling with shops and Green Market Square hosts a thriving flea market, with stalls offering local arts and crafts. Handicrafts can be bought from African Image (Church Street), Out Of Africa (Church Street) and Peluzu (70, St Georges Mall). Muandi Textiles (90 Staion Street) sells printed cloth and material, while Evlyn Kubukeli(190 LowerMain Road) is the place to go for those wishing to buy traditional medicinal products. The Cape produces fine quality wines, to ship a case home try Vaughan Johnson’s wine shop on the Waterfront.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>52</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Johannesburg Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Johannesburg - Out and About]]] Johannesburg is situated in Southern Transval, in the heart of the Witwatersrand region. The city, affectionately referred to by its inhabitants as Jo’burg, Jozi, eGoli or the “City of Gold”, is located at an altitude of 1,750metres, 45km south, south-west of Pretoria. Johannesburg was founded in 1886, following the discovery of gold deposits in the area around the city, and is now the most populated and important city in South Africa. The city, with its straight and ordered streets, has a modern feel to it and is very easy to travel around. The appeal of Johannesburg comes from being a city of great contrasts, a city that is capable of merging together its varied and irreconcilable soul: from the luxurious shopping centres, the steel and glass skyscrapers to the desperate and pitiful shanty- towns, from the elegant districts of Houghton and Parktown, surrounded by jacaranda and Australian acacie trees, to the Zulu ghettos and the Beverly Hills district with its black millionaires, where their magnificent villas stand next to the painted shacks, that dominate this residential zone of the bourgeois Zulu. The Northern suburbs, referred to as the South-Western-Townships, are large squatter camps with Soweto being the most important. This sprawling and sometimes frightening mass of bungalows, huts and shacks is can be visited. A tour is organised, which includes stops at the old residences of Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu, together with visits to restaurants, shops and other places of interest. The tour costs 150 rand. It is here in Soweto, that the anti-apartheid uprising began in 1976. The area is host to 4 million inhabitants, divided into 9 ethnic groups: predominantly Zulu, Soto and Xhosa, the tribe to which Nelson Mandela belonged. Johannesburg has numerous cultural institutions, among them The University of Witwatersrand, founded in 1922, The Witwatersrand Technical College, an astronomy observatory, a geology museum and an art gallery .Some of the most important buildings include: Saint Mary Anglican Cathedral, built of sandstone in 1926, The Carlton Centre, with its panoramic floors and towers, The City Hall, the Public Library, The Civic Theatre complex, The Stock Exchange building and The Rissik State Post Office, built in 1897. Johannesburg is not a difficult city to find your way around. The city’s main bus station is in Vanderbijl Square, where an information desk provides details of the bus service. Few buses run after 5:30pm, after this time it is more convenient to catch one of the mini-buses which operate as taxis and which can be found throughout the city. The International Airport, situated 25 km from the city centre, has a bus service which connects it to the city. This service runs every half hour from the airport to Leyds Street, next to the railway station. The train station is the main departure point for all the region’s trains. [[[Johannesburg - Not to be missed]]] The Chamber of Mines organises trips to the local gold mines. The African Museum has exhibitions detailing the dawning of South Africa and the African Museum in Progress has an ethnology exhibition, with reconstructions of old dwellings, tools and equipment. At Phumangena u Muzi, near Aloe Ridge, visitors can stay in an old style Zulu village, complete with food and tribal dances. The Bernberg Fashion Museum hosts a complete collection of South African costumes. The era of the great gold rush, which began in 1886, can be re-lived at Gold Reef City. This mine with its old foundry, now offers a hotel, restaurant, chemists, chinese- laundry and gold exchange. [[[Johannesburg - Walks and tours]]] For those wishing to see lions and antelopes in their natural habitat, visit the Honeydew Lion Park and the Neighbouring Kugersdorp Game Reserve, both located less than half an hour ‘s drive away from the city. The Gauteng Snake Park, at Midrand, north of the city, provides an ideal setting for its large collection of African Reptiles. Pretoria, the administrative capital of South Africa, with its wide tree-lined streets, is located 45km from Johannesburg. Sun City , the entertainment highlight of South Africa is situated to the north-east of the city. Sun City is a pay to enter vast recreational complex,with numerous slot machines gambling tables. The Sun City complex offers the most ostentatious hotel structures on the African continent, set in a wonderland of sub-tropical gardens,lakes,paths and waterfalls. [[[Johannesburg - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : South African Rand Electric supply: 220/230 volts, necessitates the use of an adaptor Climate : The Summer temperatures rarely exceed 30°C. The Winters are warm and sunny with temperatures ranging from 6°C to 17°C Language : Afrikaans and English Opening hours : The banks are open Monday to Friday, 9.00am to 3:30pm.The main bureaus of exchange are open Monday to Friday, from 8am to 8pm, Saturday from 8am to 6pm, Sunday from 10am to 4pm. The main shopping centres are open until 9pm; shops close at 5pm Telephones : There are many private telephone services throughout the city. The most practical method is to purchase a phone card from the various Telkom branches. The number for local information is 1023. The General Post Office is in Jeppe Street and is open from 8am to 4:30pm and from 8am to noon on Saturdays. [[[Johannesburg - A pocket guide]]] Johannesburg is a difficult city, with a history of violence, due, above-all, to the enormous difference between its rich and poor. It is a rather dangerous city and therefore not advisable to wander alone after 5pm. The only district in Johannesburg where it is relatively safe to walk around at night is Yeoville. It is possible to catch a taxi in order to reach Yeoville, but the fare must be agreed upon before-hand. Rosebank is the heart of the shopping district, with flea markets, caft stalls offering products from all regions of Africa and hundreds of shops, which together with restaurants and pubs, line the bustling streets. More exclusive purchases can be made at the Sandton Shopping Centre in the Intercontinental Hotel Tower, with its fashion boutiques, diamonds and ethnic art. True shoppers can make their way to the Carlton Centre in Commissioner Street, which has three-storey shopping centre. The Carlton Panorama is a terrace located on the 50th floor of this complex and offers spectacular views of the city. At Market Theatre, in Bree Street, among art galleries, theatres and cafés, the jazz enthusiast will find an excellent meeting point at Kippie’s Bar. The Oriental Plaza, with over 300 shops is only a short distance away. Marcia Street is the site of the vast Flea Market World, which comprises of numerous stalls, selling arts and handcrafts. There is also also possible to watch colourful ethnic dances being performed, similar to those attractions offered at Gold Reef City. South Africa has a rich choice of cuisine, thanks to the contributions of its people,and the vast and varied nature of this country, that spreads from The Tropic of Capricorn to the temperate regions of The Cape. To the north of the city, vineyards originally planted by the French, produce some excellent wines. Spices and techniques imported from India and Malaysia add an exotic touch to the food. Johannesburg’s gastronomy has a cosmopolitan flavour and the connoisseur will be embarrassed by the choice. Le Canard in Sandown, The Chapters in The Sandton Sun Hotel and the l’Ile de France in Randburg, are but a few of the fine restaurants available. Traditional South African dishes can be sampled at Anton Van Wouw, Leipoldt or Grammadoela. The “Spur” restaurant chain, offers good quality Tex-Mex style food at highly compatible prices.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>53</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Barcelona Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Barcelona - Out and About]]] The north-eastern Spanish city of Barcelona, is the capital city of the autonomous region of Catalonia. The city, the second largest in Spain with its 1,454,695 inhabitants. is the principal commercial, financial and editorial centre of the country. The city is not only a university seat but also a lively cultural centre, which houses museums of great interest including the prestigious Picasso museum, the Museum of Catalonian Art and the Mirò Foundation. The Gothic Barrio is the medieval heart of the city and site of the Santa Eulalia Gothic Cathedral and the beautiful Santa Maria del Mar Gothic. It is also the location of the Picasso Museum, which houses works relating to the entire of the artists activities.The city is divided to the south-west by the Rambla. This famous street is bustling with flower sellers, mime artists, and newspaper stands open 24 hours a day. The street leads from the promenade at the water's edge to the Placa de Catalunya, the 18th century part of the city and site of the elegant Passeig de Garcia with two magnificent buildings by Antoni Gaudi: the multicoloured Casa Battlò and the splendid Mila house, better known as 'La Pedrera' . The north-western part of the city is the site of the unfinished Sagrada Familia. The Eixample is the area that developed after the destruction of the city walls and became the true centre of the city. The area is home to modern monuments including the Quadrati d'Or, the Passeig de Sant Joan, the Avingude Diagonal and the Ronda de Sant Pere. The Edificis Trade is the city's largest retail area and includes numerous elegant shops. Other interesting areas include the Palau Reial de Pedralbes and the Monestir de Pedralbes, built in the 14th century and which today houses part of the Thyssen-bornemisza collection. A fine view of the city can be had from the summit of Tibidabo (532 metres). Barceloneta is the seaside district of the city and the meeting point for the city residents and the sea. It is here that the finest beaches and bathing areas are to be found. The metropolitan has four lines and operates from Monday to Friday from 5am to 11pm, Sunday and holidays from 6am to 1am. Buses run from 6.30am to 10pm and the most convenient ticket is a travel card. The Montjuic rack railway, departs from Number 1 metropolitan station and runs to Avinguda de Miramar, from here it is possible to take a cable-car ride up to the Montjuic Castle. [[[Barcelona - Not to be missed]]] Take the Gaudì artistic and architectural trail, which leads through the city. It starts with the unusual street lamps with which the young Gaudì, who, at the time, was a student of architecture, won the urban design competition and subsequently became responsible for designing the Placa Reial, a Neoclassical square with palms and porticoes. The route continues, taking in his first house ( Casa Bellsguard) and leads the visitor to the spectacular Casa Battlo and the Casa Mila 'Pedrera'. The ' Pedrera' has a undulating smooth surface of pale stone, with a Art nouveau railing in wrought iron, which tempt the observer to gaze from the ground skywards a metaphor for the passage from the earth to the heavens. This passage culminates in a splendid terrace, comprising medieval knights carved from warm red stone, steep brick staircases and bottle-green and white mosaics. Both Casa Battlo and Casa Mila look out over the elegant Passeig de Gracia. The Sagrada Familia, located in the north-east of the city, was the final work of the Catalan artist . This audacious building, a mix of architectural styles, Neo-Gothic, Cubist and Art Nouveaui, was started in 1883 and today still remains unfinished, following the express wishes of the artist. The incomplete building is intended to signify the tortuous and unfinished path of the individual in his search for God and spirituality. [[[Barcelona - Walks and tours]]] An unforgettable trip is that which starts from the Passeig de Gracia and heads north-east for several kilometres leading to the Guell Park, planned and in part built by Antoni Gaudì. The park was originally intended to be a garden city at the gateway to Barcelona. The entrance to the park evokes the fairytale world of Hansel and Gretel, laid out as a maze, combining natural and artistic forms with mosaics, tiles and wrought iron as the raw materials. The buildings are purposely built with a pronounced lean to them, giving the visitor the impression that they are about to collapse or melt. The Montjuic Hill, is situated on the other side of the city near the sea. The summit is easily reached by bus or by cable-car. This is the site of both the 17th century castle and the Joan Mirò Foundation, which houses works from the great Catalan artist. The surrounding park is the site of the Sant Jordi Olympic Stadium, built for the Olympic Games in 1992, an event which established Barcelona as an internationally important city. Barceloneta ( small Barcelona) is the old working class district of the city. At one time inhabited by fisherman and sailors, this zone is now the favourite seaside and bathing area for the residents of Barcelona. [[[Barcelona - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : euro Electric supply: 220 Volts but in some places it is still 125 Volts or 110 volts. Round two pin plugs are used. Climate : mild climate with limited rainfall Language : Catalan, Spanish Opening hours : banks are open Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 2pm. Saturday from 8:30am to 2pm. [[[Barcelona - A pocket guide]]] Barcelona organizes some of the most important festivals in Europe, including the Grec, Barcelona Summer Festival, a festival of antique music, the Festival Jazz and the Festival of Contemporary Music. A complete guide of what's on is published weekly in the Guia del Ocio or other publications including the Revista Municipal, Barcelona e Vivire Barcelona. Important shopping areas in Barcelona include Diagonale and the zone between Piazza Catalunya and Portaferris.Les Encants in the Plaza de la Glories is an open-air market selling all manner of things. Barcelona is one of the richest European cities for night-life and entertainment. The city's bars and clubs are crowded with young people. Numerous discos and clubs can be found in Diagonale, Aribau and Muntaner. Poble Esapanyol, on the mountain of Montjuic, houses one of the most glittering and entertaining clubs , both for its size and for its structure. Port Vell is a new zone of Barcelona, dedicated to entertainment. A wide range of Catalan dishes are on offer in the restaurants in the sea-front zone of Sea Palace.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>54</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Madrid Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Madrid - Out and About]]] Madrid is both the capital of Spain and of the autonomous region of the same name. The city is situated on the Meseta plateau in the Nueva Castilla region. Madrid, lies along the Manzaneres river and at 655 metres, is the highest capital in Europe. Madrid presents itself as a large European city of great cultural and artistic interest. Originally a Moorish settlement called Magerit, the city was conquered by the Christians and by the Spanish in the 11th century acquiring great prestige in the 16th century, when Fillipo II transferred his court and nominated Madrid as the capital of his empire. Between the 18th and 20th century, with the help of the Bourbons, the city changed radically, seeing the construction of large squares, parks, sumptuous palaces and an efficient road system. The Paseo de la Castellana, is the main road in the city, which runs from north to south and links the two most important railway stations in Madrid.(Chamartin and Atocha). The oldest districts in the city are between Paseo del Prado, site of the city's art galleries and the Royal Palace in the west of the city. Remains of the original historic centre of Madrid include: Puerto del Sol and Plaza Mayor, historic site of city parades, executions and Inquisition trials.. The square is dominated by the Panaderia (1620), with it two towers dating back to the 18th century. The centre of the square is the site of a statue of Filippo III on horseback. The Royal Palace is located to the west, the official residence of Spain's royal family until 1931. the building is now referred to as the Oriental Palace and houses government offices. The Sabatini Gardens , situated in front of the Palace, house artificial lakes, classical statues and tree-lined paths. Madrid's city life rotates around two important roads, Gran Via and Via Alcala, which represent the city's path to 20th century modernization. A magnificent fountain representing the Roman- Greek Goddess of nature, Cibeles riding a chariot pulld by two lions, stands in the centre of Plaza de Cibeles. The four corners of the square are occupied by the Bank of Spain, the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Communication and America House ( Linares building). The latter houses a fine collection of Latin-American artists. The Metropolitan is the best way to reach the centre. The system has 10 lines and operates from 6am to 1:30 am. The metro tickets are also valid for travel on the buses. It is also possible to to purchase a ' tarjeta turistica' which permits travel on all the various public transport for 3 or 5 consecutive days. The state railway is operated by RENFE, whose trains heading north and to France leave from Chamartin Station, those heading south, from Puerto de Atocha Station and noth west from Principe Pio Station. [[[Madrid - Not to be missed]]] The Prado Museum, houses the world's best collection of 11th and 12th century Spanish paintings, together with Flemish, Italian, German and English masterpieces. The Reina Sofia Art Centre, has one of the largest exhibition spaces in the world and houses works of art from 1881 to the present day. Amongst the various halls it is possible to admire works of art including. Mirò, Dali, Juan Gris, Gonzalez, Chillida and the famous ' Guernica' by Picasso. [[[Madrid - Walks and tours]]] The 'Slag Heap' Monastery is located 45 km from the capital. This palace-mausoleum of S. Lorenzo, was built for Filippo II to celebrate his victory at San Quintino. It gets its name from its unfortunate position next to a slag heap. It is however, an impressive building and a magnificent example of early Spanish Renaissance. A visit to the Pardo Forest is highly recommended. This oak forest is located 20km from the centre and is the site of the Quinta Palace and the Royal Palace, at the centre of the park. This royal building was constructed for Charles V in the 16th century and was the residence of Francisco Franco from 1940 to 1975. [[[Madrid - A pocket guide]]] The principal shopping area, is the zone comprising Gran Via and Puerta del Sol. Elegant shops are also to be found near Goya metro station. Madrid is lo interesting for those looking for second-hand markets and unusual shops. Bars clubs and discos are to be found throughout the city and is is often possible to listen to live music and dance the flamenco. To really live Madrid it is necessary to move from place to place and be absorbed by the music and atmosphere.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>55</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Stockholm Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Stockholm - Out and About]]] Stockholm, Sweden's capital city and major port, lies between lake Malaren and the Baltic Sea. Part of the city is situated on an archipelago of twenty islands and part on the Swedish mainland. The city, with its bridges and canals,its large open spaces and both old and modern buildings, creates an efficient, harmonious city. The old city, which, when founded in the 12th century, had a city wall. This area is made up of Stadholmen. Riddarholmen and Holgeandsolmen islands. Even though the city has suffered a lot of damage from fires, the centre has still managed to maintain its medieval feel. This is the site of two highly important religious buildings, dating back to the 13th century, the Saint Nicholas Cathedral, on the island of Stadholmen, site of royal coronations and the Riddarholm Church, on the island of the same name, resting place of Sweden's Kings and Queens. Stadholmen island is also the site of the Royal Palace. Completed in 1754, the building contains 608 rooms, some of which still host official royal ceremonies. The National Museum, located in front of the Palace, is housed in a 18th century building and contains the largest collection of Swedish art. The 17th century House of the Nobles ((Riddarhuset), on the island of Riddarholmen, is a splendid example of Dutch Baroque and once served as the residence of the Nobility. Holgeandsolmen island is the site of the Parliament building (1905) and the old State Bank (1906) and the Town hall, which is located in the centre of the Kungsholmen district. This red-brick building was constructed between 1911 and 1923 and features a 106 metre bell-tower, which chimes twice a day. The building's blue room is the site of the Nobel Prize presentations, which take place on the 10th of December every year, on the anniversary of the death of Alfred Nobel, the rich 18th century industrialist. The lush, green island of Djurgarden is located to the east of the centre, beyond the small island of Skeppsholmen, site of the 1998 Modern Art Museum. Djurgarden was the royal hunting zone and today is the site of the Vasa Museum, inaugurated in 1990 and home to a large battle-ship. The Skansen, a large open-air ethnology museum is situated a short distance away. The museum houses exhibitions of Swedish farming life, with entire ancient Scandinavian buildings on display, which have been transported and re-built on site. The ultra modern district of Norrmalm is located on the mainland to the west of Lake Malaren and north of the old city. The district is home to the main railway station and the Kungstadgarden, one time royal gardens and now an important meeting point. The Stadium, built in red brick in 1912, for the Olympics of that year, is situated in the Ostermann district. The large district of Sodermalm, south of the old city and linked to it by the Centralbron (central bridge), is the location of the Globen Stadium. Built in 1989 and site of sporting events and concerts. The 1883 Katarinahissen, is a 38 metre high panoramic lift, which provides the visitor with spectacular views over the city. Like other large cities, Stockholm is best appreciated by walking around it. The public transport system is , however, clean and efficient. [[[Stockholm - Not to be missed]]] The metropolitan has three lines and 100 stations. The service operates until 1am, when the night time bus service begins. The buses are powered by ethanol and greatly reduce the pollution in the city. Bus passes can be bought for a single ride, 10 rides, daily use, 3 days or monthly. It is also possible to buy the Stockholm Card, a travel card which also allows free entrance to the city's museums but is not valid for travel on Stockholm's ferries. The ideal means of transport, in particular during the summer, is the bike. these can be easily rented and the cycle paths are well signposted and numerous. Canoes, kayaks and pedaloes can also be easily hired in order to enjoy Stockholm from the water. [[[Stockholm - Walks and tours]]] The Dottningholm Castle ( 1662-1700), the royal family residence, has been declared a Unesco World Heritage Site. The castle grounds are the site of a theatre constructed in wood, dating back in 1763, which hosts Baroque musical operas. The Theatre Museum with costumes and original scenery is located nearby as is the not-to-be-missed Chinese Pavillon. A boat which leaves from the city centre takes visitor to Birka, on lake Malaren, the first Swedish town, founded by the Vikings in the 8th Century. The Stockholm Archipelago comprising 24,000 islands, merits a boat trip. A 25- minute boat trip takes the visitor to Fyaderyolmarina at the mouth of the archipelago, site of characteristic pubs and shops, a sea museum and an aquarium. The island of Vexholm is 75 minutes from Stockholm and has modern houses and a XVI Century fort. Visitors can arrive on the island of Uto in 2 hours and 45 minutes, site of the oldest iron mine in Sweden. Samdhamn is noted for its natural beauty. A pleasant trip with background jazz music can be taken on the steam boat Blidosund. [[[Stockholm - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : Swedish Crown Electric supply: 220 Volts, 50 Hertz Climate : pleasant summers and fresh winters, thanks to the Atlantic Current. The average temperature during the period May to September is 15-22°C. Opening hours : shops are open Monday to Friday from 10am to 6pm and from 10am to 3pm on Saturday. Many are also open on Sundays. Post offices are open from Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm. Banks are open Monday to Friday from 9:30am to 3pm and one day a week until 6pm. [[[Stockholm - A pocket guide]]] Midsommer ( the longest day of the year) is one of the most interesting festivals in Sweden. The festival is celebrated the weekend closest to the 24th June. Stockholm is decked with flowers for the occasion and people meet at Skansen, to celebrate with music and dance.The Saint Lucia Festival is held on the 13th December, when, during what is considered the shortest day of the year, young girls dress in white and bearing candles, offer biscuits and hot drinks. The Stockholm Beer festival is held during the months of May to September. September and October are the months of Xposeptember, the city's film festival. The Christmas Market takes place during November and December in the main shopping zones of the city, including Hotorget, Gamla Stan, Drottninggatan, Hamngatan, Bibloteksgatan and Stureplan.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>56</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Boston Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Boston - Out and About]]] Boston, the state capital, is situated in the bay of Massachusetts, near the mouth of the Charles Mystic rivers. The city was founded in the first half of the 17th Century, and grew in the 18th Century, parallel with its increase in economic fortune. As the city of Boston grew, it encompassed those villages on its outskirts and became the most important Atlantic business centre. Boston’s complex urban network is made up of minor villages that have been swallowed up by the ever expanding city; all this, located in a setting rich in hills and lakes make Boston a relatively difficult city to travel around. The city stretches along a series of small peninsulas, linked by a system of bridges and tunnels, which give the city the feel of an elegant province with a tendency towards being a modern metropolis. From various locations around Boston, it is possible to comprehend the history of the city. Old Boston can be seen in what remains of the old road network in North End and some of the rare buildings to be found in the Beacon Hill residential district. Some of the buildings in this area date back to the first half of the 18th century, such as the renaissance building which houses the Public Library(1852) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) building (1723). Most of the historic monuments are situated along the Freedom Trail, an interesting and easy route, best done on foot. The 6.5km route is indicated by a red stripe painted on the pavement. The route leads to Park Street, passing King’s Chapel (1749-1758), the first hotel built in the city and the Old City Hall; School Street houses an old library (1712) ; the Neo Classic Tontine Crescent; the Neo-Romanic Trinity Church and the Neo-15th Century Boston Public Library, with over 1 million volumes; the Shaw Monument(1897) commemorating the 54th regiment of Massachusetts and Smith Court, which houses the African Church (1806), the oldest cultural site of Boston’s black population. Crossing the John F. Kennedy Expressway, the red stripe leads the visitor to North End. The wooden house at number 19, North Square, now a national monument ,was the old residence of Paul Revere, who, between 1770 and 1800, became a hero of the revolution. The building is the oldest in the city and one of only a few that remain from the colonial period. The pedestrian area of Beacon Street is lined with old houses and architectural treasures reflect the essence of Boston .Boston is a city of refined cultural tradition and an important centre of learning. The city is the seat of various universities, including the prestigious Harvard University,founded in 1636 and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1865).Boston’s numerous cultural institutions include: the Museum of Fine Arts, containing Egyptian artefacts from the IV dynasty; the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, housing a rich collection of Italian art (Tiziano, Rafaello) and the world famous Boston Symphony Orchestra Institute(1881). The city is serviced by the Logan International Airport and numerous rail links. Boston’s fishing port is the most important in the USA The city transport system consists of four metropolitan lines, five boat lines and 170 bus routes, that function from 6:30am until late in the evening, allowing the visitor easy and cheap access to the city. [[[Boston - Not to be missed]]] Plymouth is a beautiful example of an old New England coastal village. It is advisable to begin a tour of the village from the information centre, on the corner of Water Street and Memorial Drive. Plymouth is home to a full-size replica of the Mayflower, the ship used by the Pilgrim Fathers when they first arrived in 1620. Harvard University, founded only 16 years after the arrival of the Pilgrim Fathers, merits a visit. Whilst touring the university grounds, it is possible to see the Jonston Gate, the Massachusetts Hall and the University Hall, with its bronze statue of the founder John Harvard. Botany lovers should explore the Arnold Arboretum (125 Arborway), which boasts a fine collection of trees, bushes, bonsai, lilacs, roses and Chinese plants. The Observatory of the Prudential Centre Sky Walk skyscraper offers fine views over the city of Boston and on clear days, it is possible to see as far as Cape Cod. A worth-while tour is that of the Boston Duck Tour, an amphibious craft, that takes its passengers both along the city streets and onto the Charles River. For a more relaxing tour, try a cruise of the bay and discover the many small islands. [[[Boston - Walks and tours]]] The Old Sturbridge Open-Air Museum, 60 miles from Boston, in the heart of New England, narrates the history of the USA. Cape Cod, comprising New Bedford, is located south of Boston. This seaside town, made famous by Melville and his story Moby Dick, is one of the most popular villages on the East Coast. The whole of the east coast of the peninsula has been declared a protected nature zone. [[[Boston - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : US $ sub-divided into 100 cents. Electric supply: 110-120 V, 60 Hz Climate : Humid, the average annual temperature in Boston is between 10-11°C. The State often has hurricanes and tornadoes. Opening hours : The shops are usually open from Monday to Saturday from 10am to 6pm, the large shopping centres until 8pm. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 3pm. Telephones : Telephone code: 617 [[[Boston - A pocket guide]]] Quincy Market was once the city’s open air market, today it is now a bustling centre of shops and restaurants. By taking the fly-over from here, the visitor arrives in North End, the Italian district of the city, the site of a fruit and fish market, which is held every Saturday. Beyond the old port, where restaurants line the waterfront, there are rows of old houses, which once belonged to Boston’s fishermen. The city’s principle street for shopping is Boylston Street. Newbury Street , running parallel to Boylston Street, has numerous health-food stores. The buildings along Commonwealth Avenue, house a large number of university student associations.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>57</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Chicago Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Chicago - Out and About]]] Chicago with its 2,800,000 inhabitants is the largest city in Illinois, USA. The city, with a surface area of over 25km2, lies at the extreme south-western point of lake Michigan, at the mouth of the rivers Chicago and Calumet. The Loop is the most interesting and characteristic zone of the city. It is Chicago’s business centre and is bordered by Michigan Avenue to the east, the Chicago river to the north and west and Congress Parkway to the south. The Loop is home to Chicago’s major firms and industries and houses the city’s tallest skyscrapers, some of which are of great architectural importance: the First National Bank Building and Sears Tower which, at 443metres, is the world’s second tallest building. Lake Shore Drive winds its way along the shore of Lake Michigan. It stretches for 20km, from Lincoln Park in the north to Jackson Park in the south, passing over an impressive bridge, which spans the mouth of the Chicago river. This wonderful road is flanked by marbled buildings on one side and a series of flowerbeds and parks on the other. Some of Chicago’s most important cultural institutes are located along Lake Shore Drive. They include: the Museum of Science and Industry on south side; the Field Museum of Natural History; the Shedd Aquarium and the Art Institute of Chicago, all of which are located in Grant Park. The Art Institute is famous above all for its collection of French Impressionist art and the American Gothic art of Grant Wood. Chicago is the American and world capital of modern architecture and houses America’s first and now famous school of architecture. Chicago’s architectural culture is centred around the experiences of Frank Lloyd Wright and Mies van der Rohe. The characteristics of this architectural movement are clearly evident in Praire House, “organically” designed in order to merge with the natural surroundings. The Praire Avenue District houses some of the most elegant limestone and brick buildings, which have been restored and are now held in great consideration as authentic masterpieces of the 19th century. The Glencoe District , to the north of the city, is one of the oldest and richest suburbs in America. Chicago possesses many large parks, including Jefferson, Washington, Hyde, Morgan and Kuburn. The city, an important cultural centre, boasts over 100 further education university and post-university institutions: University of Chicago (1890), the North Western University (1851), Loyola University and the Public Library, which contains 1.5 million volumes. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1891, is amongst one of the most prestigious orchestras in the world. Chicago has always been characterised by dimly-lit and smoky jazz bars, featuring blues singers and musicians from the deep south. To obtain detailed information regarding the jazz scene, call at B.L.U.E.S. in North Halsted or at Checkerboard Lounge in South-side. Chicago is served by over 20 rail links and three airports of which the international airport O’Hare is the busiest in the world. The subway provides an easy and comfortable way to visit the city. [[[Chicago - Not to be missed]]] Oak Park District, situated to the west of the Chicago ring road, is easily reached by the overland subway (elevator) which runs to Lake Street CTA. Having arrived at Oak Park Avenue, the visitor should walk one block north to Lake Street and for two blocks west to Kenilworth Avenue, the suburb where Hemingway grew up and where F.L.Wright lived and worked during the first years of his career. The largest collection of his work is made up of the 25 buildings located here. Wright’s studio home ( 1889) is perhaps the best expression of his genius. The principal F.L.Wright buildings are: Walter Gale, 1031 Chicago Avenue, William H. Winslow at 515 Auvergne Place, Mrs. Thomas Gale, at 6 Elizabeth Court, Lake Shore Drive Apartments, 860-80 North Lake Shore drive. A map of the area is indispensable. It is possible to obtain a breath-taking view of the city and Lake Michigan from the terraces of the skyscrapers Board of Trade Building, Tribune Tower, Prudential Building and Marina City. The Marina City Skyscraper, built between 1964/5, with its unusual cylindrical shape, is of particular interest. The city centre often hosts open-air sculpture exhibition, featuring great artists such as Holdenburg, Calder, Picasso and Mirò. [[[Chicago - Walks and tours]]] The Indiana Dunes State Park and National Lakeshore are located east of Chicago, a few kilometres beyond the Indiana border (a 60- minute car drive). These two neighbouring parks allow the visitor to admire: beautiful sand dunes, which vary from 3 to 20 mt. heights and stretch for over 3 km.; sandy beaches; forest lakes; swamps and prairies. Long Grove, situated 60 km. north-west of Chicago, is an old village that has maintained intact the atmosphere of the 19th century. The village’s old wooden houses and covered bridges are famous for having been featured in the film “The bridges of Madison Country”. It is an ideal place for shopping, with numerous little shops that sell a little of everything, from antiques and chocolates to clothes and souvenirs. Starved Rock State Park, situated 80 minutes by car, west of the city, is one of the most popular attractions around Chicago. The park has over 16 miles of paths and trails, which pass amongst rock formations, small canyons, thundering torrents and panoramic view points, from where it is possible to admire the Illinois river and its valley. [[[Chicago - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : US Dollar, sub-divided into 100 cents Electric supply: 110/120 volts, 60 hertz Climate : continental Opening hours : Shops are usually open Monday to Saturday, from 10 am. until 6 pm.; the large shopping centres until 8. Banks are open Monday to Friday, from 9 am. until 3 pm. Telephones : Telephone code : 312</testo> 
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 <titolo>Honolulu Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Honolulu - Out and About]]] Hawaii, the fiftieth state of the United States of America , consists of eight large islands, four smaller ones and numerous tiny coral islets. Honolulu, the capital city of Hawaii, is situated on the south-east coast of the island of Oahu. The city, with its, 400,000 inhabitants, stands on the slopes of Punchbowl Crater, an extinct volcano,and covers a surface area of 220 km2 . Honolulu is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world, favoured for its splendid natural surroundings, lush vegetation and healthy climate. Honolulu, which means “sheltered port”, was discovered in 1794 and the Hawaiian king’s residence was constructed in 1820. The city houses both a university specialising in the study of marine biology and numerous cultural institutions:the Neal S. Blaisdell Centre; the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, which possesses one of the finest collections of Hawaiian and Polynesian ethnological objects; the Honolulu Academy of Arts, which houses oriental and western works of art and the Alice Cooke Spaulding House, which contains Asiatic works. Other interesting areas and buildings within the city include: The Iolani Palace State Museum, the official residence of the King of Hawaii, until the abolition of the monarchy in 1893; Saint Andrews Cathedral,built in 1862 and the US Arizona Pearl Harbor Memorial, which commemorates the victims of he Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. In the Punche Punchbowl, an old crater town, it is possible to visit both the Pacific National Memorial Cemetery, with the mortal remains of those victims, who lost their lives fighting in the Second World War and Korea; The Kawaiaho Church built in 1840, the oldest in the city, and the large statue of Kamehameha I, which is ornately decorated during national holidays. Pearl Harbor is located to the north. This important US naval base represents a major economical resource for the state of Hawaii. Commercial maritime traffic is very intense, as the island, well protected by coral reefs, is used by the major transpacific freight companies. Honolulu serves as an important stop-over airport for the major international air companies. Moving around the city is easy, using the City Express bus service, while the Country Express bus service links the city to the out-lying areas. A ferry service takes visitors to the other islands of the archipelago. [[[Honolulu - Not to be missed]]] The elegant bathing zone of Waickiki, with its famous beach, is situated in the bay of Mamala, to the west of Honolulu. The bay of Maunalaua and the extinct 222metre- high volcano, Diamond Head, are to be found to the south of the island. On the eastern part of the island of Oahu, the road for Kahana bay, takes the visitor, first to the fascinating Makapu Point and the Makapu Beach Park and then onto the Sea Life Park ,with its collection of over 2000 species of fish. At Laie, it is possible to visit the Polynesian Cultural Centre, a highly popular Hawaiian attraction, where reconstructions of old polynesian villages allow the visitor to gain an insight into the ancient culture of these islands. [[[Honolulu - Walks and tours]]] The Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is situated on Hawaii, the largest island of the archipelago. The national park was established in 1916 to protect the natural wonders of the Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. A visit to this park should start from the Kilauea Visitor Centre, where a notice board provides information about the daily activities on offer (free guided tours), together with updated information about the volcanic eruptions. The best way to visit the park, other than a guided tour, is to follow the Crater Rim Drive, a 18km circuit, that takes the visitor around the smoking craters of Kilauea Iki, Halemaumau and others. There are many interesting routes to be explored on foot, which apart from offering views of lava formations, allow the visitor to admire the local flora and fauna. The national park of Haleakala is situated on the island of Maui. The park is home to the largest volcano in the world, which last erupted in 1790. The volcano's crater has a circumference of 34 km and is 914m deep. The park comprises both the volcano and the coast of Kipahulu, nominated by the United Nations as “one of the few areas of outstanding natural world importance.” The road that runs through the park is 17km long and offers superb views of Mount Leleiwi, Kalahku and Puu Ualua. The visitor centre is located at a panoramic view point, at the entrance to the park. [[[Honolulu - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : US dollar, sub-divided into 100 cents Electric supply: 110-120 V, 60 HZ Opening hours : The shops are generally open, Monday to Saturday from 10am to 6pm, the large shopping centres until 8pm. The banks are open, Monday to Friday from 9 until 3pm. [[[Honolulu - A pocket guide]]] There are a number of large shopping centres which house over 100 shops, offering a wide choice of goods: Aloa Tower-Market Place, Wictoria- Ward Center, Ala Moana- Hawaii’s Centre.</testo> 
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 <ID_gui>59</ID_gui> 
 <titolo>Las Vegas Guide</titolo> 
 <sottotitolo /> 
 <testo>[[[Las Vegas - Out and About]]] Las Vegas, with almost 405,000 inhabitants, is the largest city in the state of Nevada, in south-western USA. Founded in 1855 as a Mormon colony, the city began to expand rapidly, following the construction of a dam on the Colorado River and the subsequent formation of Lake Mead. In that same year the State of Nevada legalized gambling. The city is also home to the University of Nevada-Las Vegas(1957), and the Nevada State Museum and Historical Society, which contains interesting sections regarding the history of the state. Las Vegas is famed however for its large casinos and luxurious hotels. The first of which being The Flamingo Hotel, built in 1946 , owned by Bugsy Siegel, a renown gangster, who invested their money gained from a life of crime, in the sumptuous interior of the hotel and its dazzling pink neon façade. Thus creating the guidelines, still valid today, for the elegant and somewhat flashy hotels. The gambling nerve centre of Las Vegas is Downtown, the Centre and above all the Strip, an 18 km long road flanked by hotels and casinos of monstrous dimensions. Theme hotels have sprung up over the last twenty years, these amusement parks house the largest casinos, characterized by the constant background noise of the tinkling of thousands of slot machines. The true monuments to Las Vegas are its hotels and their large and surprising interiors. The Imperial Palace houses one of the largest collections of historic cars, while the Mirage, situated in front of the Imperial, welcomes its visitors with an artificial lake and a volcano that erupts and spews lava every 15 minutes. In front of Treasure Island, visitors are treated to a naval battle, complete with pirates, cannons and sinking ships. The New York- New York is a reconstruction of the island of Manhattan, with skyscrapers, Brooklyn Bridge and the Statue of Liberty. The prize for the most kitsch goes to Caesar’s Palace, a replica of ancient Rome with marble columns, statues, fountains, and a golden chariot illuminated by torches; the interior houses reproductions of famous Roman statues and a copy of the Bernini fountain in Piazza Navona, it is also possible to have a drink and be waited upon by staff dressed as ancient Egyptians on Cleopatra’s Barge. The Excalibur is located further along the Strip, the hotel resembles a castle with merlin the magician looking out of the top window. The Luxor is a giant pyramid which houses over 5000 rooms, built to Egyptian style. The MGM hotel has copies of the famous Hollywood studios. The most recently built hotels include: Paris, Venice and Bellagio, which are scale reproductions of these towns and cities complete with Eiffel Tower, gondolas and Lake Como with a fantastic dancing fountain display. All these luxurious hotels apply a very reasonable tariff, much lower than other USA cities, basing their earnings on the gains derived from gambling. It is easy to find a double room for about 100 dollars, while those hotels located off the Strip offer much lower rates even as low as 30 dollars. The city also offers hundreds of nightly shows and exhibitions. The Las Vegas Entertainment Guide (Tel. 702-2255554) provides an updated recorded message, giving detailed information on what the city has to offer. To fully appreciate the Strip it is necessary to stroll along its length on foot. Relatively cheap taxis and buses are the best means in order to visit the rest of the city .During the day it is best to hire a car to visit the surrounding area and leave the glitter of Las Vegas for the evening. [[[Las Vegas - Not to be missed]]] Old Las Vegas Mormon Fort State Historic Park is located at the cross-roads between Las Vegas Boulevard and Washington Avenue. The park houses both the remain of the old fort built by the Mormons in 1855 and various artefacts from the same period. Main Street, which starts where the Strip finishes, is lined with tiny doll-like chapels, used for lightning-quick weddings typical of Las Vegas and the State of Nevada. Hoover dam is located a few miles south of the city . The dam holds back the Colorado river and is 224 metres high and 384 metres long. Guided tours and boat trips can be booked from the Visitor Center. [[[Las Vegas - Walks and tours]]] The Desert National Wildlife Range is situated a short distance from the city along the US highway N° 45. The park is the largest natural reserve in the state and is home to hundreds of species of animals including coyotes, deers, elks, prong horn and rare birds. The reserve is open all year round. The reserve entrance is located at Corn Creek Field Station. Valley of Fire, the oldest and largest state park in Nevada, is situated approximately 50 miles north-east of Las Vegas. The park obtains its name from its red rock formations, often covered by petroglyphs. The park also contains an area of petrified forest. The 100 mile long artificial Lake Mead, considered to be the Las Vegas Riviera, is located 30 miles south of the city. A more strenuous trip, which can be undertaken in one day, is a visit to Death Valley, located approx. 140 miles north of Las Vegas (2.5 hours by car). This arid place is full of fascinating and wonderful panoramic sites. The landscape varies from the mountains of Dante’s Peak to the golden rocks of Zabrienski Point, from the hollow of Sand Dunes at Furnace Creek and Mosaic Canyon to the ghosts towns and the old magnesium mines. Grand Canyon is an undoubtedly splendid but expensive trip (approx. 200 dollars per person). The Canyon can be reached by car, living the interstate 40 at Williams for the interstate 64. Plane flights from Phoenix or Las Vegas take the visitor to the town of Tusayan, 8 km. from Grand Canyon village. However one arrives, they are met by the awe-inspiring site of this enormous gorge eroded over a period of millions of years from a mountain plateau. Gand Canyon can be observed from three separate zones: the South Rim, the North Rim and the gorge itself, from where it is possible to descend directly to the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon village is located on the South Rim and houses numerous hotels, a post office and supermarket. The North Rim offers a wide of variety of hikes and trails and is less crowded by tourists. For booking and accommodation: Reservation Department, Grand Canyon National Park Lodges, Grand Canyon AZ 86023, tel. 602-6382401. [[[Las Vegas - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : The unit of currency is the US$, subdivided into 100 cents. Electric supply: 110/120 volts, 60 hertz Climate : desert Opening hours : Shops are usually always open inside the hotels and casino. The shops of the city are open every day from 10 am. to 9 pm. Telephones : Telephone code: 702 [[[Las Vegas - A pocket guide]]] The large hotels-casinos contain numerous restaurants offering a range of meals from elegant dinners to fast-food snacks. These large complexes also house a variety of shops and boutiques offering gifts, clothing, jewellery and perfume.</testo> 
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 <titolo>Los Angeles Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Los Angeles - Out and About]]] Los Angeles, situated on the Pacific Ocean coast, surrounded by the San Bernardino mountain range, is the largest city in California. Los Angeles, the USA’s second most populated city after New York, is a major industrial and commercial centre. The city’s world –wide fame is linked to the film-making and television industry, however Los Angeles, with its mild winters and warm summers is also a popular holiday destination. Los Angeles was founded in 1781 by Spanish Franciscan monks and given the name Nuestra Senora Reina de los Angeles. The city belonged to Mexico until 1848, when, together with California, it became part of the USA. Los Angeles, 80 km long and with a surface area of 1200km2 is too large to rotate around one city centre. The city’s construction has never followed a rational building plan and the result is a de-centralised city with a number of individual built-up areas linked by a dense network of roads. (Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Culver City, Hollywood, Inglewood, Long Beach, Pasadena) Los Angeles is a notable cultural centre and is home to numerous academies including: the California State University(1947); the Loyola Marymount University (1911) and the University of California-Los Angeles UCLA ( 1919), worth a visit, in order to gain an idea of an American university campus. The city does not possess many significant or important monuments or buildings, however its title as the capital of the cinema industry, makes it’s a great attraction. A guide d tour of Los Angeles usually starts in the Hollywood district, where a tour of Universal Studios is obligatory. The studios house the Universal Amphitheatre, where international rock groups and pop stars perform. Hollywood Boulevard, a large open-air amphitheatre in Highland Avenue is home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. The pavement, outside Mann’s Chinese Theatre, is famous for its foot and handprints of show-business stars. The 40km- long Sunset Boulevard, immortalised in the 1950 film of the same name, best shows the vast economic and architectural differences of the city. The road stretches from the rich and famous Bel Air and Beverly Hills to Hollywood and Downtown, the oldest part of the city. Travelling westwards the visitor arrives at the self-governing Beverly Hills, home of Rodeo Drive and its luxurious shops. The most ostentatious houses are located along Benedict, Colwater Canyon and Laurel Canyon. The original nucleus of ”Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles del Rio de Porciuncula” is the Downtown administration centre, around Olivera Street and near to the City Hall. Olivera Street is the oldest street in the city; it resembles an old Mexican market square and has some buildings that date back to the 18th Century .The Union Passenger Station is located along Alameda Street. This 1939 railway station, a mile-stone in Los Angeles architecture, connects the city to San Francisco and San Diego. El Pueblo de Los Angeles is a historic park which preserves the atmosphere of an old Spanish village. The park houses the Plaza Church (1822) and the Bradbury Building (304 South Broadway); this national monument, a masterpiece of marble, steel and precious wood, has an open cage lift and was featured in the Ridley Scott film, Blade Runner. From Malibu to Newport, the Los Angeles’ coast is lined with beaches: Venice, Malibu and the enormous Santa Monica with its famous Pier which houses fairground attractions from the last century. A cycle route runs along the coast from Pacific Palisades until Marina de Rey. Los Angeles has numerous beautiful parks including: Griffith Park, which houses the city zoo and the Gene Autry Heritage Musuem; Exposition Park, with the Museum of Science and Industry and the Museum of Natural History and Hancock Park, between the residential districts between Melrose, Wilton and Wilshire, noted for its 1920’s architecture. The Los Angeles county museum of Art is located on Wilshire Blvd and houses collections of contemporary, Asiatic and Middle-Eastern art. Other notable museums include the Museum of Contemporary Art; the Southwest Museum; the Hollywood Bowl; the Malibu and the Paul Getty Museum, a reconstruction of the Villa dei Papiri in Ercolano, home not only to the museum, but to an art research and study centre, set up by the millionaire Paul Getty. The museum’s collection includes 18th century American artists, Renaissance, Baroque, Roman and Greek art. Los Angeles, with its large and heavily congested Freeways, is best visited by car. During rush hour it is possible to travel at the slow speed of 40 km per hour. Apart from the beaches, the only part of the city, where it is possible to visit on foot is: Little China town, Little Tokyo and Olivera St. The three metropolitan lines ( blue, red and green) and numerous bus routes, connecting the various centres, make moving around the city relatively easy. [[[Los Angeles - Not to be missed]]] Venice, overlooking the Ocean, is a lively and colourful location of artists, break dancers, punks, surfers and musicians. Marina del Rey separated from Venice Beach by a Quay, is a huge tourist port. The port is overlooked by Fisherman Village and is the site of numerous beautiful walks. Long Beach in South Bay offers two attractions: Queen Mary, the famous transatlantic liner,now a museum and the Spruce Goose, an enormous sea-plane, built during the Second World War, by the millionaire and Hollywood producer Howard Hughes. Disneyland, created in 1955 by Walt Disney, is located in Anaheim,and is easily reached travelling along the Santa Ana Freeway, exit at Katella avenue. The park is divided into six zones which depart from Main Street : Frontierland, Bear Country, Adventureland, Fantasy Land, Tomorrow Land and New Orleans Square. The Main Street is the site of the Electrical Parade,an evening procession of cartoon characters and floats, illuminated by thousands of fairy lights. The parade finishes with a magnificent firework display. Take a ride on “ Colossus”, the largest and fastest big dipper ever built. It is 3km long and reaches a speed of 100km per hour. The big dipper is located at Six Flags Magic Mountain on Interstate 5 near Valencia to the north of Los Angeles. [[[Los Angeles - Walks and tours]]] The coastal town of Santa Barbara, marks the imaginary Southern Californian line, where travelling northwards, the visitor leaves behind him the influence of Los Angeles. The town is dominated by Spanish architectural style. Its white painted houses, covered with red-tiled roofs are decorated with ornate wrought-iron balconies. In the 18th century the Spanish gave this place the name of “ Tierra Adorada” and founded the Santa Barbara Mission, an excellent example of a Franciscan mission and which today houses a museum. One of the most beautiful national parks in America is located on five small islands off the coast of Santa Barbara. The park is so extraordinary, that is has been declared an International Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations. The channel, which separates the islands from the mainland, is a migratory route for whales and sea lions. Any tour of the island should start from the port of Ventura, where a visitor centre provides all the necessary information about this archipelago. The park is a real paradise for divers and for those wishing to observe the park’s flora and fauna. The island of Catalina, located 30 km. off the coast of Los Angeles, is a carefully protected nature reserve. The visitor centre rents glass bottom boats, which allow the visitor to admire the extraordinary sea bed, giant algae and multicoloured fish. The Mojave National Reserve is located approx. 200 km. to the east, along Interstate 10 and 15. The reserve comprises 600 hectares of arid and fascinated desert. The various roads, which cross the Mojave, allow the visitor to appreciate mysterious volcanic landscape, sandstone cliffs, shimmering salt flats, abandoned mines and sand dunes, which reach a height of 180 metres. The reserve is home to the desert tortoise, big horn sheep and the American black tailed hare, known as the “Jackrabbit”. [[[Los Angeles - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : US Dollar, subdivided into 100 cents. Electric supply: 110-120 volt, 60 hertz. Climate : Mediterranean, with warm and dry summers with mild winters. Opening hours : Shops are usually open Monday to Saturday, from 10 am. to 7 pm. Many are also open Sunday at the same times. Telephones : Telephone code: 213 [[[Los Angeles - A pocket guide]]] National holidays: New Year’s Day, 1 January Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May Memorial Day, last Monday in May Flag Day, 14 June United States of America’s Independence Day, 4 July Labor Day, first Monday in September Columbus Day, second Monday in October Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day, 25 December</testo> 
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 <titolo>Miami Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Miami - Out and About]]] Miami is situated in southern Florida on the Atlantic coast of the USA. The city lies in Biscayne Bay, at the mouth of the river Miami. Miami was founded in 1870, on the original site of Fort Dallas, constructed during the war with the Seminole Indians. The city began to expand rapidly in 1870, following the construction of the rail link, that joined the city with West Palm Beach. Since this period the city has undergone continuous urban growth, becoming a luxurious city and one of America’s most famous bathing and health resorts. The city comprises Miami Beach, situated on a 13km long island, at the extreme north of Biscayne Bay and the large suburbs of Coral Gables, Miami Spring and Miami Shore. The largest concentration of Art-Deco buildings from the 1930’s are to be found on the southern part of the island between the coast and 23rd Street. The area, bordered by the four streets: Ocean Drive, Alton Road, Washington Avenue and Lincoln Road, comprises 800 buildings with original trompe-l’oeil from the 30’s together with other architectural styles, including Mediterranean Revival and Tropical Style. Miami Beach forms a small part of the larger and more complex Miami City, an area that contains a heterogeneous population, consisting mainly of black and Latin-American nationalities, especially Cubans, who live in Little Havan, between Southwest 12th and Southwest 27th Avenue. The heart of this Cuban district is Calle Ocho, where the shops display Spanish jewellery and crafts and where everything is Cuban, even the hot dogs are called “perros calientes”. The area is bustling with open-air markets, restaurants and live music in the squares. The North Shore Recreation Area, a beautiful lush park, only a few paces away from the beach, is located 5 miles north of the city. Travelling a further 5 miles will bring the visitor to the Old Spanish Monastery. Dedicated to San Bernadino, the monastery was erected in 1100 in Spanish Segovia and brought here brick by brick to be re-constructed on this site. Bayside, with its many elegant shops and dance clubs, is located along Biscayne Bay in the city centre. Coral Gables, considered to be the Beverly Hills of Miami, is a district built almost entirely of coral rock. The site of numerous millionaire’s residences and home to the spectacular Hotel Biltmore, Al Capone’s refuge when he escaped from Chicago. Artists and writers, whose presence has added a Bohemian touch to the city, are grouped on and around Coconut Grove, where many of the older houses have been constructed using salvaged wood from naval wrecks. Notable examples in this area are: Villa Vizcaya, residence during the 1920’s of the collectionist James Deering and now an interesting museum with splendid garden and the Barnacle, home to the pioneer Ralph Middleton Munro, who resided here at the beginning of the last century. The Miami Seaquarium, at 4400 Rickenbacker Causeway, offers dolphin shows and the possibility of observing a “lamantino”, a species of dolphin with a large, bulbous and somewhat comical nose. The city possesses a university seat and is home to: an institute for oceanic research, interesting museums ( modern art, history and natural science), a snake house and a racecourse in a magnificent park setting. The island of Miami beach is crossed length-ways by Collins Avenue. The old hotels, located in this area, have undergone extensive refurbishment during the last ten years and a wooden boardwalk has been constructed along the beach, between 21st and 46th Street, allowing visitors to stroll along the water’s edge. One of the marvels of Florida are the Keys: a chain of coral islands that initially stretches in an orderly, single file for 240 kilometres, from Key Biscayne to Key West and then continues in a more random manner for a further 110 kilometres to Dry Tortugas. 42 bridges and innumerable pillars planted on the ocean floor, link each of the coral islands and forms a spectacular setting for the road that runs for 240 kilometres to Key West. Having arrived at Key West, it is recommended to visit the beautiful aquarium and the Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site. The best way to move around Miami Beach is by bicycle or moped, both of which can be rented from Miami Beach Cycle (601 Fifth Street) Miami Airport is located 11km from the centre. Various bus companies run services that connect the airport to the centre and the centre to its out-lying districts. [[[Miami - Not to be missed]]] The Biscayne National Park, situated south of Miami in Biscayne Bay, comprises 30 small islands, that peek out no more than 2.5metres above the surface of the sea. The bay has an average depth of 2 metres and is home to banks of long- leaf seaweed, which attracts shrimps, crabs and sea-horses. This under-sea world makes up 95% of the park and is home to the northern most coral banks in our hemisphere. 50 different types of coral have been identified. The more interesting banks are to be found 3-5km to the east, at Elliot Key, marked by blue and white buoys. Other varieties can be seen among the reefs of Elkhorn and Coral Star, while the delicate, purple- fanned coral can be found at Dome Reef. Visitors should start their tour from the Convoy Point Visitor Center, which has a pier stretching for almost 1km out to sea. A private tour operator, based in Convoy Point, organizes boat and diving trips together with a taxi service to Elliot Key, one of the largest islands in the park. The island is home to a variety of tropical vegetation, including mahogany, Jamaican cornel, wild coffee, cinnamon, the strangler fig and many others. Visitors to the island, who are advised to wear mosquito-protective clothing, will find a 7km path, which provides an interesting view of this fascinating Jungle. The Everglades National Park, founded in 1947, covers and area of 5700 km2 at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula. Numerous animals live within the parks confines including: panthers, alligators, otters, sea-cows, snakes and birds. The area has been classified an International Biosphere and Swamp-land Reserve. A trip along Anhinga Trail, 6 km from the entrance, is an interesting and exciting adventure. The trail runs past the alligator reserve, where it is also possible to observe various species of heron, including the green-back and blue. The Ranger station, at Everglades City, is the departure point for short cruises around the mangrove estuary, referred to as Ten Thousand Islands. Numerous companies organise excursions along the Tamiami Trail. The Wilderness Waterway is a 100 mile trip by boat, between Flamingo and Everglades City, which allows the visitor to penetrate the heart of the park. [[[Miami - Walks and tours]]] Cape Canaveral, America’s famous space station, is located 220 miles north of Miami. It is linked by a bridge to Merritt Island, a natural oasis and at the same time the site of , NASA Air Force Station and rocket launch site. Kennedy Space Station is located a few miles from the entrance. Here it is possible for the visitor to stroll among the rockets., enter the Shuttle and watch three-dimensional documentaries about space. A guided tour of 2 hours leads the visitor through the various testaments to man’s space exploration. The other side of Merrit Island is the National Wildlife Refuge, a park created in 1963, which provides a safe exile for the regions birds. The area is extremely interesting for bird-watching fans. Orlando is situated 200 miles north of Miami and 35 miles west of Cape Canaveral. It is home to three major attractions: Sea World, a marine–biology centre with an enormous aquarium offering seal, sea lion, dolphin and killer whale displays; Universal Studios and Walt Disney World, first opened in 1971 and now the biggest amusement park in the world. [[[Miami - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : The unit of currency is the US$, subdivided into 100 cents. Electric supply: 110-120 V, 60 Hz. Climate : The temperature is tropical with a high rate of humidity. The end of summer sees the arrival of hurricanes that can simply result in strong winds or, as happened in 1992 with Hurricane Andrew, devastate the area causing severe damage. Telephones : Telephone code:. 305 [[[Miami - A pocket guide]]] National holidays: New Year’s Day, 1 January Matin Luther King Memorial, third Monday in January G.Washington Birthday, third Monday in February Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May Memorial Day, last Monday in May Flag Day, 14 June United States of America’s Independence Day, 4 July Labor Day, first Monday in September Columbus Day, second Monday in October Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day, 25 December</testo> 
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 <titolo>New York Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[New York - Out and About]]] New York, or as it is often referred to “The Big Apple”, is situated in the state of New York, in the north-east of The USA. The city is located at the mouth of the river Hudson and is sub-divided into five districts: Queens, Brooklyn, Bronx, Manhattan and Richmond (Staten Island). New York, the main destination for European and Asian immigrants, has, during the last century, become one of the biggest and most cosmopolitan cities in the world. The lay-out of Manhattan is easy to understand. The avenues run from north to south and are numbered from east to west, from First Avenue to Eleventh Avenue. Some of the avenues have names and not numbers, such as York, Park, and Madison Avenues; the avenues all operate a one- way traffic system. The streets, which run from east to west, are for the major part all one- way. The roads in Lower Manhattan until Houston Street all have names. From Houston Street travelling north, the streets are all numbered. Manhattan Island, divided into 23 historic districts, is the main tourist attraction in New York. The city has only few buildings which date back before the 19th century; the more noteworthy are: Saint Patrick’s Cathedral(1879),and the Trinity Church (1846). The city is best known for its skyline, made up of tall and impressive skyscrapers: The Flatiron Building (1902), The Woolworth Building(1915), The Chrysler Building(1930), The Empire State Building (1931) and The Rockfeller Center (1931). Until the events of the 11th of September 2001, the Twin Towers of The World Trade Center (1977) were the city’s tallest buildings. The New York Transit Authority runs a scheme which provides a quick and efficient way to visit Manhattan. The scheme consists of two bus routes, which operate at week-ends and national holidays. Upon buying a ticket it is possible to get off the bus at any of the designated stops along the route, visit the area and hop on the next bus that passes. New York, the economic and financial capital of the country, hosts the seat of The United Nations, The Stock Exchange (Wall Street) , The Federal Reserve Bank and other important financial institutions. The major television networks and the principal publishing companies have their head offices in the city. New York is also host to the prestigious Columbia and New York University and contains a vast array of important museums: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the USA’s art museum looks out over Central Park, The Guggenheim Museum in Park Avenue, The Museum of Modern Art or MoMA, among one of the richest contemporary art museums and The American Museum of Natural History, the world’s largest natural history museum. Broadway, the city’s theatre district, contains over 30 theatres. The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, near Central Park, houses The Metropolitan Opera House, The New York City Opera and The Avery Fisher Hall. Carnegie Hall, built in1890 and one of the country’s most prestigious concert halls, is located on 7th Avenue. Due to the chaotic traffic and the lack of car parking , it is advisable to travel around the city using public transport . Taxi cabs are probably the best means of travelling around New York, however they are conditioned by the traffic situation and therefore should be avoided during rush hour. The bus service, reliable and economical, is often too slow. Most routes operate 24 hours a day and those buses painted blue and white are the most comfortable, as all of them are fitted with an air-conditioning system. The subway is the quickest and most efficient way of moving around the city. The network consists of 469 stations and many lines are operational 24 hours a day. The carriages are modern, well- lit and fitted with air-conditioning. The other districts, although less interesting, form a tourist’s point of view, play a fundamental role in making up this varied metropolis. Brooklyn, connected to Manhattan by both a series of bridges and The Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, is the most well-known and populated district of New York. It is located along subway Lines 2 and 3 . Brooklyn Bridge, built in 1869, crosses The East River and is the most famous bridge linking Brooklyn with Manhattan. The least built-up district is Richmond, on Staten Island, linked to Brooklyn by The Giovanni da Verrazzano Bridge. The Bronx district is situated on the mainland but, unfortunately,does not enjoy a good reputation. It is worthwhile visiting The New York Botanical Gardens, an immense park which boasts 230 varieties of roses, 58 varieties of peonies and a world famous herb garden. In order to arrive at the gardens, catch the Metro North which leaves from Grand Central Terminal. Queens is the largest district and is host to over 120 ethnic groups. The N line of the Metropolitan(subway) serves this area or it is possible to arrive in Queens by either crossing The Queensboro Bridge or by driving through the Queens-Midtown tunnel. New York is serviced by three airports: John Fitzgerald Kennedy (referred to as JFK) situated in The Queens district; Newark Airport, situated to the north in New Jersey, which handles international flights and La Guardia situated in Queens, which handles domestic flights. In order to arrive in Manhattan, from either of the three airports, it is advisable to catch a bus. The two Manhattan bus terminals are: Grand Central Station, located between Park Avenue and 42nd Street, close to a subway station serving the east of the city, and The Port Authority Bus Terminal, on 8th Avenue. The buses leave every 30 minutes from 6am to mid-night. [[[New York - Not to be missed]]] The Empire State Building on Fifth Avenue is one of the symbols of New York. From the observatory on the 86th floor, the view, both during the day and at night, is truly breath-taking. A boat trip around the island of Manhattan, allows the visitor to admire the city’s skyline and to visit Liberty Island, where the famous statue is located. The Statue of Liberty, a gift from France, was designed by the Frenchman Frederic Bartholdi and given to the USA in 1876. A stroll in Central Park is not to be missed: this green heart of the city stands in 340 acres, in the centre of Manhattan. This large park alternates between grassy open spaces, woods and artificial lakes. A system of bridges and arches links the paths, lanes and the paved roads. The visitor can take a ride on one of the horse-drawn carriages for an unforgettable tour of the park. Take a walk along Fifth Avenue, passing the Rockfeller Center, an extraordinary complex of 19 buildings built between 1931 and 1940, which houses among others The NBC television studios and The Radio City Music Hall, which is accessed from 6th avenue (Avenue of the Americas). The heart of the complex is The Rockfeller Plaza, with its famous ice-skating rink dominated by the golden statue of Prometheus. Travelling south, along Broadway, having crossed lively and bustling Times Square, the visitor meets Greenwich Village, the artistic district of the city; Little Italy, the Italo-American stronghold of New York and Chinatown, home of the busy Chinese community. The New York City Hall, a beautiful building, open to the public, is located on the corner of Broadway and Murray Street. Visit The Museum of Modern Art (entrance in W53rd St between 5th and 6th avenue), Guggenheim Museum(entrance in Park avenue) and The Metropolitan Museum Of Art (entrance in Park Avenue). [[[New York - Walks and tours]]] Coney Island is in reality a peninsula to the south of Brooklyn. It is located one hour’s train journey away from the centre of Manhattan. It is the destination of the New Yorkers, who, during sunny days, flock to Brighton Beach. The real attraction of Coney Island is its old- style fair ground , with an enormous Ferris wheel, which operates from Spring to Autumn. Ellis Island, a small island close to Liberty Island (both can be reached by boat), hosts the historic Immigration Office which, from the period 1892 to 1954, saw the arrival of 12 million people. Today it has become a museum, dedicated to those people, who travelled to the New World, in search of hope and fortune. The Queens district houses The Flushing Meadows-Corona Park which, between 1939 and 1964, hosted The Universal Exhibition. The USTA National Tennis Centre, home of the US Open, and The Shea Stadium, home of The Mets, are located within the confines of the park. The Richmond Museum, an open-air town museum, is located on Staten Island and consists of 39 historic buildings, 15 of which are open to the public, where actors, in period costume, help create the atmosphere of a by-gone age. [[[New York - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : the unit of currency is the US$, subdivided into 100 cents. Climate : winters are harsh and summers are sultry. The best time to visit is spring or autumn Opening hours : the majority of the shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 10am to 6pm. The large stores in Midtown remain open until 8pm on Thursday. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 3pm. The museums are closed on Monday, one time a week they remain open until late in the evening, offering reduced prices or free admission. Telephones : Telephone code. 212 Manhattan and Bronx, 718 Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island [[[New York - A pocket guide]]] A trip to Soho is not to be missed. Take the subway, lines C and E to Spring street; lines N and R to Prince Street, lines B, D, F, Q to Broadway- Lafayettte. It is the focal point of the colourful artistic district of the city and a peaceful pastime can be had strolling among the numerous art galleries. The “Time Out” magazine, with its “Gallery Guide” details what is on offer in this area. Some addresses for the shopping enthusiast: Macy’s, the largest department store in the world (Herald Square at 34th st.- tel 212.6954400), Bloomingdale’s ( 1000, 3rd Av. At 59th st- tel. 212.7052000), Saks Fifth Avenue ( 611, 5th Av. – tel. 212. 7534000), Barney’s (660, Madison Av. – tel.212.8268900) and Brooks Brothers, (346, Madison Av. –tel. 212.6828900), Nike-Town (6E 57th st, tra 5th Av e Madison Av. –tel-212.8916453), Original Levi’s Store ( 3E 57th st- tel 212.8382188), F.A.O. Schwartz (77, 5th Av –tel 212.6449400) a famous toy store, Annex Antiques Fair and Flea Market ( 6th Av, tra 24th e 27th st) has 600 stalls,open Saturday and Sunday, The Showplace (40W, 25th st at 6th Av), The Garage (112W, 25th st at 6th Av). National holidays. New Year’s Day, 1 January Matin Luther King Memorial, third Monday in January G.Washington Birthday, third Monday in February Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May Memorial Day, last Monday in May Flag Day, 14 June United States of America’s Independence Day, 4 July Labor Day, first Monday in September Columbus Day, second Monday in October Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day, 25 December</testo> 
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 <titolo>San Francisco Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[San Francisco - Out and About]]] San Francisco, California’s second largest city, is located on the Pacific coast, at the extreme northern point of the San Mateo Peninsula. The San Francisco area stretches southwards along the peninsula and comprises nearly 40 hills. The city and its hills form an incredibly scenic back-drop, home to Victorian houses, suspension bridges and the famous cable-cars straining to climb the steep roads. The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco’s most famous suspension bridge, is one of the longest in the world. The bridge, built in 1937, serves to link the city with Marin County at the mouth of the bay. It is possible to drive over the bridge by exiting at the Sausalito junction of the freeway and passing along Conzelman Road. To see the bridge from its base, the visitor should go to Fort Point, site of the Praesidium, a fortified military zone, founded in 1776 by the Spanish and occupied until 1847 by the Americans. The chapel and the officer’s club still remain, as evidence of this military period. The Praesidium complex is located in the elegant district of Richmond which is lined along its ocean shore by Lincoln Park. Castro Street and the Mission District are located on the hill-side nearby and originally formed the nucleus of the city. Today it is the site of the Hispanic community, which developed around the site of the Dolores Mission, situated between 16th Street and the corner of Dolores Street. Dolores Street joins Market Street, and leads into Buchanan Street, site of the Japanese Consulate and home to the Japanese community. The beautiful Japanese “Cherry Blossom Festival” is held here every April. Following Van Ness, one of the main city streets, the visitor descends to Market Street and the Civic Center, which houses various Government, State and Council buildings, together with the more prestigious cultural institutions in the city: the 1915 City Hall, inspired by the Classic-style architecture of the 17th Century; the State Office building; the Main Public Library, the Civic Auditorium and the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, built in 1980 and home to the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (closed Monday), located in the vicinity, offers an extensive range of European and American contemporary art. Continuing along Market Street ,the visitor arrives in Hallidie Square; from here, Powell Street leads on to Union Square, the commercial centre of San Francisco. Maiden Lane between Geary Street and Post Street, located to the east of the square is considered the most beautiful street in the city. The Circle Gallery built in 1948 by F.L. Wright and inspired by the Guggenheim Museum in New York, is located at N°140. The largest Asian community living outside Asia, lives in San Francisco’s colourful Chinatown. A labyrinth of narrow alleys and streets complete with Buddhist temples, restaurants, shops selling exotic gods and cultural institutions including the Chinese Cultural Center and the Chinese Historical Society Museum, which displays photographs and records, detailing the development of the Chinese district. The Financial District is located at the end of Kearney Street. This zone is the centre for business, banking and commerce and is the site of the city’s skyscrapers: the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Building (1929); the Bank of America Building; The Bank of California; the Pacific Coast Stock Exchange and the Transamerica Pyramid (1972), which has now become one of the symbols of the city. North Beach, the exclusive residential district of the city is located a few blocks away from the Transamerica Pyramid. North Beach is the Italo-American district, famous for its restaurants, art galleries and night life. It is also the site of Saint Peter and Paul Catholic Church, where mass is celebrated in three languages. Italian, English and Chinese. Telegraph Hill, offering wonderful views over the city, is located a short distance away. The Coit Tower, built in 1933, stands on the summit of Telegraph Hill and commemorates the heroic work of the city’s firemen during the blaze, which followed the 1906 earthquake. Columbus Avenue, Nob Hill and Russian Hill lie to the west and make up the wealthy and prestigious West Coast district. The area is dotted with Victorian style houses, painted in pastel shades. The majority of the houses date back to the period 1870 to 1906, having miraculously survived the 1906 earthquake. Fine examples include the Haas-Lilienthal House Museum, Whittier Mansion and Octagon House. Nob Hill is also the site of the Neo-gothic style Grace Cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of the Episcople Church of California.Lombard Street, located on Russian Hill, is regarded as the world’s most tortuous street. It has an incline of 40% and a series of 10 curves, which wind their way around among elegant flower-beds. Fisherman’s Wharf, the city’s liveliest district, is located north of Colombus Avenue, in front of the Cannery. This old quay, with its large number of souvenir shops and local restaurants is a firm tourist attraction. The ancient, but fully functional, Ghirardelli Chocolate Manufactory stands in Ghirardelli Square between Beach, Larkin, North Point and Polk. San Francisco is home to numerous academic institutions, including: Berkeley University of California (1868), San Francisco State University(1889), Golden Gate University(1901) and Stanford University of Palo Alto (1885). San Francisco’s public transport system is comfortable and efficient. A first-time visitor must take a ride on the famous trams and trolley cars. [[[San Francisco - Not to be missed]]] A spectacular 360° view of the bay can be had from the summit of Twin Peaks. Alcatraz Island stands 2.5km off the coast. The island is the site of the famous prison, from which nobody ever managed to escape. The prison, which was closed in 1963, opened to the public in 1973 and now forms part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Ferries to the island leave from Pier 41 and 43 and guided tours are held every 90 minutes. It is advisable to book. The Golden Gate National Recreation Area is considered the largest urban park in the world. Visitors should stroll along the Golden Gate Promenade, a 6.5km trail which starts at Aquatic Park and runs to Fort Point and Golden Gate Bridge. A very scenic walk that allows the visitor to admire the Palace of Fine Arts. This semi-circular building, with two large pillars at its entrance, was constructed in 1915. The Golden Gate Park to the west of the city, is one of the most beautiful town parks in the city. The park administration at McLaren Lodge provides information and detailed maps. Guided walks are organised every week-end from May to October. The park houses: the Conservatory of Flowers, a large greenhouse with tropical plants and flowers; the Asian Art Museum with a vast collection of Oriental art and the Japanese Tea Garden, a delightful Japanese garden with wooden bridges, ornate arches, pagodas, lakes and statues of Buddha. [[[San Francisco - Walks and tours]]] The Monterey Peninsula is situated 200km south of San Francisco along the panoramic CA1. The area is renown for its beautiful landscapes and its rich and varied marine flora and fauna. The zone is the site of three charming towns: Monterey, Carmel and Pacific Grove. A detour from Pacific Grove takes the visitor along “17-Mile Drive”, a panoramic road surrounded by rare natural beauty, that passes sandy coves and rocky shores inhabited by sea lions, otters and seals. Carmel possesses the San Carlos Borromeo del Rio Carmelo Mission(1774), considered to be the finest in Northern California. Sacramento, founded in 1849 is the state capital and is s located 140 km east of Los Angeles along Interstate 80. The city contains many interesting buildings including: the State Capitol Building ,constructed between 1860 and 1874; the Old Governor’s Mansion (1877); the Californian State Indian Museum, with a fine collection of Indian artefacts and the Old Sacramento Historic Park, the old historic centre with buildings dating back to 1860. Following the I80 for a further 160 km brings the visitor to Lake Tahoe. The lake, renown for its limpid waters, is situated in a valley in the Sierra Nevada and is the largest mountain lake in North America. The lake surrounded by thick forests and bordered by small beaches is the ideal location for those who wish to practise aquatic or winter sports. 250km east of San Francisco it is possible to visit the famous and very popular Yosemite National Park. The park stands in the centre of the Sierra Nevada, and provides a spectacular display of nature: thundering waterfalls cascading down vertical, white-granite cliffs, forests of giant sequoias and meadows full of wild flowers, all this inhabited by deer, coyote, badgers and marmots. There are a host of trails and paths to be explored on foot. A bus leaves from the Visitor Center and takes the visitor to the more interesting points in the park. [[[San Francisco - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : the unit of currency is the US$, subdivided into 100 cents. Climate : Mediterranean, during the summer period fog is often present in the bay. Opening hours : The majority of the shops are open from Monday to Saturday from 10am to 7pm. Many are also open on Sunday at the same times. The banks are open from Monday to Friday from 9am to 3pm. Telephones : Telephone code:. 415 [[[San Francisco - A pocket guide]]] National holidays. New Year’s Day, 1 January Matin Luther King Memorial, third Monday in January G.Washington Birthday, third Monday in February Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May Memorial Day, last Monday in May Flag Day, 14 June United States of America’s Independence Day, 4 July Labor Day, first Monday in September Columbus Day, second Monday in October Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day, 25 December</testo> 
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 <titolo>Washington Guide</titolo> 
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 <testo>[[[Washington - Out and About]]] Washington, in the district of Columbia, situated at the fork of the Potomac and Anacostia river, is the federal capital of The United States Of America. The city, with its 53,000 inhabitants, is the seat of political activity for both The State and numerous international organizations, which together employ around 35,000 people. The city is divided into quadrants, with The U.S Capitol forming the centre. The streets, running north to south, are numbered, with the avenues, running east to west, bearing the name of the states. The central nucleus of the city is located between K Street and Capitol Hill. The Capitol, home of The American Senate, is situated on Capitol Hill. It is from here, that The Mall, the main axis of the city begins and runs until the Potomac River. This vast grassy expanse is lined with museums and public offices, which leads up to the Washington Memorial from here, the grassy expanse gives way to large gardens, which stretch up to and beyond The Lincoln Memorial until finally arriving at the river. The Abraham Lincoln Monument, erected in 1922, resembles a Greek temple, with 36 Dorian columns, one for each of the states, which made up America, at the time of the president’s death. The White House is situated to the east, at number 511, 10th street. The Ford’s Theatre is located to the north-west. It is here that President Lincoln was assassinated in 1865. A Museum, bearing his name, is housed under the theatre and possesses both the assassin’s pistol and diary . The Pentagon, site of America’s Ministry of Defence, is located at Arlington, on the bank of the Potomac river. This enormous pentagonal-shaped building covers an area of 12,000 acres. It is possible to book a guided tour at The Visitor‘s Centre. The more interesting aspects of the city are to be found in and around The Mall. Pennsylvania Avenue, a wide 2.5km long street, connects The Capitol to The White House and is the site of the annual President’s Parade. The White House, open to the general public, was built between 1792 and 1800. The building, designed by James Hoban, is built in Neoclassic style. The Smithsonian Institution Museums, located only short distance away, house The Freer Art Galleries; The Hirshorn Museum and Garden; The National Air and Space Museum; The National History Museum and The National Museum of American History. The 16 million exhibits on show, bear witness to the industrial, cultural and economical development of this country. Other note-worthy buildings include: The Kennedy Center for The Performing Arts, host to theatre plays, operas, musicals and films, and The Corcorana Gallery of Art, (subway stop -Farragaut West), this private gallery’s collection of American paintings and sculptures is second only to the Metropolitan in New York. An excellent bus and underground network, with stops at all the principle monuments , makes touring the city very easy indeed. The ticket is valid for travel after 9:30 am Monday to Friday and at all times during the week-end and can be purchased from the ticket booths in the station. Taxis do not have meters, the fare depends upon the number of city zones crossed in the course of the ride. The capital is linked by three airports: Washington National, Dulles International and Baltimore-Washington International . [[[Washington - Not to be missed]]] There is nothing more magnificent than night-time visit to the monuments, all of which are illuminated. From the viewing room at the top of The George Washington Memorial, it is possible to obtain a superb view of the entire city. Starting from The Lincoln Memorial, crossing The Memorial Bridge and entering Arlington, it is possible to visit The National Military Cemetry, where among others, John F Kennedy and his brother Bob, have been laid to rest. The changing of the guard at The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is carried out every half hour from April to September and every hour during other times of the year. Equally impressive, is the monument dedicated to the Marines, it details the raising of the flag on Mount Suribachi during the battle of Iwo Jima during The Second World War. The Botanical Gardens, built in 1816 and one of the oldest gardens in America, are located near The Capitol. Do not miss: The Library of Congress, situated in front of The Capitol.-This complex, which consists of three buildings, the oldest dating back to 1897, is elaborately decorated with murals , mosaics and sculptures and contains over 80 million volumes; The National Gallery of Art, one of the most important in the world, The Phillips Collection, the oldest contemporary art museum in the country; The Bureau of Engraving and Printing, The American Mint and The Pentagon Building, where guided tours are possible of this, the largest military complex in the world. [[[Washington - Walks and tours]]] The old town of Alexandria, situated a few kilometres south of Arlington, is well worth a visit. The town has superb 18th century buildings, which have been restored and transformed into elegant shops and restaurants. Mount Vernon, the splendid residence of G.Washington, is located along the G. Washington Pway. Travelling north-west towards Canal road, we reach The Great Falls, the last waterfalls created by The Potomac river, before it enters the city. It is advisable to walk along the bank of either canal C or O and follow one of the paths that leads to the falls. The beautiful Rock Creek Park, is situated along 16th Street, to the north of The White House. The park, with its majestic trees and wild animals, allows the visitor the possibility of discovering traces of the country’s history, while strolling along The Algonquin Indian Trail. [[[Washington - The traveller's notebook]]] Currency : US$ Electric supply: 110-120 volt, 60 hertz. Climate : Temperate Language : English Opening hours : The shops are open from 10am to 6pm, the shopping centres from 9am to 9pm Telephones : Telephone area code: 202 [[[Washington - A pocket guide]]] There are many shopping centres, which generally open from 10am to 8pm or 9:30 pm during week-days. Some of the more notable centres are: The Old Post Office Pavilion in Pennsylvania Avenue, a historic building, from whose clock tower it is possible to look out over the city. The Chevy Chase Pavilion in Wisconsin Avenue and the Fashion Center at Pentagon City, (subway stop- Pentagon City). New Year’s Day, 1 January Armed Forces Day, third Saturday in May Memorial Day, last Monday in May Flag Day, 14 June United States of America’s Independence Day, 4 July Labor Day, first Monday in September Columbus Day, second Monday in October Thanksgiving Day, fourth Thursday in November Christmas Day, 25 December</testo> 
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 <apertura>0000-00-00 00:00:00</apertura> 
 <lang>en</lang> 
 </guides>
 </hostelsclub>

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