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Toy Story 2 commentary with Director John Lasseter, Co-directors Lee Unkrich and Ash Brannon and Co-writer Andrew Stanton.

Transcript

  • JOHN LASSETER: Hi, welcome to the audio commentary of Toy Story 2.
  • (VOICE ECHOING): Two, two, two...
  • LASSETER: I'm John Lasseter, director.
  • LEE UNKRICH: I'm Lee Unkrich, the co-direct-tor.
  • ASH BRANNON: Ash Brannon, the other co-director.
  • ANDREW STANTON: And I'm Andrew Stanton, one of the co-writers.
  • LASSETER: So the titles were, were a lot of fun to do because they were kind of inspired by our favorite titles, namely Superman, right? Remember the titles of Superman?
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. Flashlight the cheesiest thing you could imagine in computer graphics is a flying logo.
  • LASSETER: That's right.
  • BRANNON: We've never done flying logos.
  • LASSETER: That were...
  • STANTON: Chrome.
  • LASSETER: Those were the first chrome flying logos Pixar ever did.
  • STANTON: Finally caught up. Yep.
  • LASSETER: To start Toy Story 2, we, we actually went back to an idea we had on the original Toy Story. We always wanted to start with a real Buzz Lightyear adventure. Originally in Toy Story, we wanted to do it cel-animated, but we resurrected the idea 'cause we wanted to sorta take the audience a little off guard, you know? Everybody's coming in, sitting in the theater with the popcorn and Cokes. You know, expecting Toy Story 2, you know.
  • UNKRICH: "Where are our cute little friends from Andy's room?"
  • LASSETER: Yeah, yeah. "Andy room. Where's Andy's room?" And we wanted to like start it as though the projectionist put up you know, real five...
  • UNKRICH: Of Armageddon.
  • LASSETER: ...of Armageddon or something.
  • UNKRICH: Oops.
  • LASSETER: It's just, like, smack in the middle of the climax. And just establishing as Buzz reenters the atmosphere of this planet, he, he flies in close to the surface. Now what you're seeing is actually from A Bug's Life, the model of ant island and the riverbed. And the floating rocks were actually a mistake 'cause we scaled the riverbed to be one and a half times its size to make the cliffs taller, but the rocks didn't get that transformation.
  • UNKRICH: But they look so cool.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. We went into the review and said, "That is so cool. Keep it, let's keep it."
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. They were apologizing for the rocks that were floating in the air. "No, no, this is cool."
  • BRANNON: "Don't change it or you're fired."
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. They went one better and they made them all rotate...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...and that was really great.
  • Buzz: ...no sign of intelligent life anywhere.
  • LASSETER: This is... It's almost the exact dialogue from when Buzz Lightyear was on...
  • STANTON: Andy's bed.
  • LASSETER: ...Andy's bed.
  • UNKRICH: This is kind of an homage to Episode I or Starship Troopers. We just wanted to have as many of these robots as possible just going off onto the horizon of this planet.
  • STANTON: Right. So we thought they way to go beyond that is that they come out of the shoulders and then robots come out of the other shoulders.
  • LASSETER: It's just...
  • STANTON: You can't get any more than that.
  • LASSETER: It's sort of a Dr. Seuss-ian kind of space robot.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, right. This whole thing of course is so packed with references to every...
  • LASSETER: Oh, it's... 
  • UNKRICH: ...sci-fi movie.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, it's HAL's lens there on the little, the camera there.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, that. The other really cool thing about this whole opening is that it was the very... It's literally the last thing we did on the entire movie. And what that let us do, is we always wanted to have things that happen in this opening echo later in the movie when deluded Buzz goes into Al's building and is working his way through the ducts the air, ducts in the house. We wanted there to be all these similarities. Because we did this last, we were able to make sure that this was just chalk full of references to that whole sequence.
  • STANTON: That's a drive we have in any of the movies we do. Is we want to have as many things have more than one use. And that they come back and it just makes the film so much tighter, more organic.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, it's what we call "the weaving." We establish something later in the film and come back in the beginning and set it up. But then the setup is completely disguised and you don't realize it's a setup. "Source of Zurg's power," floating AA battery.
  • STANTON: Can't think of anything better.
  • UNKRICH: One of the biggest laughs in the movie.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • (music plays)
  • STANTON: There was a debate on what themes these should be but 2001 won out. And I think it was the best one.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. It's great and we came up with this great idea of having the chunking, the pounding machinery in the background sound like the tympanis...
  • LASSETER: Yeah, that would be in the tympanis, yeah. Gary Rydstrom, our sound designer, he did that. It was really hilarious. And this is the first time also we have true intersection. It's one of the things we're constantly battling in computer animation. And so in this case, we actually had Buzz Lightyear's hand go right through that battery. One surface doesn't know where another surface is within computer animation. It's constantly intersecting. We're working hard to make things feel like they're contacting just 'cause that's believable.
  • STANTON: This is one of those things where I was just like, "Thank you. Can we get away with that?" There's always just collective silence in the audience. "My God, how did they..." (LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: It was point. We just wanted to make it seem like Buzz is so cool and he's gonna do it, and then he just gets disintegrated from the waist up.
  • Buzz: In fact, you're a better Buzz than I am.
  • Rex: But look at my...
  • LASSETER: So even though this is Andy's new house, of course, 'cause they moved in the first movie, we did the, the walls to be a similar blue, and the lighting is very, very similar to Toy Story 'cause we wanted the audience just right away to say, "Okay, we're in the world of Toy Story, we're in Andy's room." We tried to bring a lot of references and character introductions that would really best represent each of the characters and remind you of, of the original Toy Story.
  • UNKRICH: At one point, we had a whole... We tried having a whole song here, like a whole intro to everybody, just to... Similar to You've Got a Friend in Me at the beginning of the first Toy Story. And we realized everyone knows these characters and we just wanted to kinda get through everything as quickly as possible and meet our old friends and kinda move on with our story.
  • LASSETER: I think that's one of the exciting things about doing the sequel was that you didn't have to worry too much about character introductions. It's just like, everybody is here wanting to see their favorite characters again. So it's like...
  • UNKRICH: We just found something funny for each one and just kinda like moved through everybody quickly.
  • Hamm: ...not beyond.
  • LASSETER: I love Hamm's introduction because the whole notion that lawn gnomes are alive as well.
  • UNKRICH: I think we need to do a whole movie about lawn gnomes.
  • LASSETER: Shh.
  • UNKRICH: Oh, sorry.
  • LASSETER: Lee.
  • UNKRICH: I'm fired, aren't I? (LAUGHS)
  • Mr. Potato Head: ...potato!
  • LASSETER: The first new character we introduce is Mrs. Potato Head. Of course, we have to have Mrs. Potato Head in the movie. And Estelle Harris does the voice. She is fantastic.
  • UNKRICH: She was George Costanza's mom on Seinfeld, of course.
  • LASSETER: And she just...
  • UNKRICH: I can't imagine anyone else playing her.
  • LASSETER: She really brought that character to life. It was great.
  • Woody: ...Andy.
  • Bo Peep: Uh-huh. And the boy who wrote that would take you to camp...
  • STANTON: You basically get the full package of Pixar here at the very beginning of the movie. You get the action, the filmmaking, they you get the entertainment and the humor. Now you get the final ingredient, which is the heart. And we wanted to remind the audience, from an emotional standpoint, very early on, that Woody's world is all about Andy, that he really does care the most about him. We really felt this scene, this little moment here, is what it does that in a very touching way, but also very economical.
  • LASSETER: In using the hat, and losing his hat became a very important device because we always figured as a collectible toy, you want all the parts, and so he kept his hat through the entire Toy Story.
  • (UNKRICH AND STANTON LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: So we wanted to start this movie where he can't find his hat and this is just freaking him out. As you see later in the movie, it becomes a very important element. It's what causes him to get stolen.
  • Woody: Oh, Slink, thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you. Where'd you find it?
  • Slinky Dog: Well, that's the bad news.
  • LASSETER: It was really exciting to sort of set up Buster the dog in the same way that we remembered Scud from the first movie. We wanted this whole setup here is to fake the audience out.
  • UNKRICH: Big vicious dog.
  • LASSETER: Dogs and toys don't get along. Dogs chew toys. That's it. That's what the world, you know, that's what you remember from Toy Story and so this whole thing is set up to really fake the audience out until, of course, Buster finds him and he's gonna ready to chew his head off and he starts licking him. And, and...
  • UNKRICH: People love this.
  • LASSETER: When he... When Woody comes alive. It's a wonderful thing to sorta set the the audience up and to fake them out. Buster's actually a great guy.
  • UNKRICH: Brilliant animation here that Kyle Balda did.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, Kyle did this great. And, you know, there's a lot of new... One of the new technologies that is in Toy Story 2 that's not in the original is that we were actually able to put real fur, you know. The fur on the dog is like thousands and thousands of individual little hairs. It really has an incredible look to it. It makes it be a much more believable dog.
  • Andy's Mom: Andy, honey, come on. Five minutes, and we're leavin'.
  • Andy: Five...
  • UNKRICH: It's my two-and-a-half-year-old daughter playing Molly in the background.
  • LASSETER: Oh, that's right. She's the voice, isn't she?
  • UNKRICH: Singing her little cheese and tomato song she knows.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • Andy: Never! You must choose Sheriff Woody. How shall she die? Shark, or death by monkeys?
  • STANTON: I just love death by monkeys.
  • BRANNON: Yeah. When in doubt use monkeys. You'll be fine.
  • UNKRICH: That's the credo I live my life by.
  • LASSETER: That's right. Lee loves monkeys.
  • Andy: ...beyond!
  • BRANNON: There's a great lighting touch that comes up that Sharon did. When Woody's arm rips, the sun goes behind the clouds. It gets a little bit darker in the room.
  • UNKRICH: Sharon Calahan, our brilliant director of photography.
  • LASSETER: Because we, right here.
  • UNKRICH: There.
  • LASSETER: It's very subtle. Most people don't know, but you feel it.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: It becomes less saturated in colors. But that was... That's one of the most important single little moments in the movie is that rip of Woody's arm. And we went around and around in, in making sure that that just affected everything. And we even added that close-up later 'cause originally we had animated it in the wider shot and it just wasn't reading.
  • UNKRICH: And we were actually amazed when we did preview screenings of the movie, at that moment when his arm rips there was just be this audible gasp from the audience, from kids and adults alike.
  • STANTON: We, early on, decided you had to have something that physically reminded you throught the entire movie how fragile his state was. You couldn't make him feel as old as he was. He couldn't grow older. So you had to have something that always reminded you that he was at the winter of his years. And, the rip and sort of, the inability to use the arm was what did that for us.
  • LASSETER: We always try to find visual storytelling means instead of just saying things. And that's why the puff of cotton that comes out of his shoulder, it's always there and it's always a reminder to Woody of this, that he's very fragile and he's getting old and he's worried that Andy is not gonna play with him.
  • STANTON: Here's another sequence that actually came from an idea that was executed for Toy Story...
  • UNKRICH: That abandoned.
  • STANTON: Yeah. ...that we pulled out that made it into Toy Story 2. We had a nightmare sequence in Toy Story where Woody was worried that Andy was gonna throw him away. But him falling off the bed was so clear, we didn't... It was redundant. We didn't need it.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, we didn't need it. Joe Ranft is our story supervisor and he storyboarded this sequence, and he storyboarded the original Woody's nightmare from Toy Story 1. And he puts all these great little references into it. And one of the things... My favorite was all of the toy characters are playing cards, but all of the cards are ace of spades, which is in, I guess, fortune telling...
  • STANTON: The death card.
  • LASSETER: ...the death card. And it was just one of the early things that kinda tips a hand that something's wrong here. Something... This is not normal.
  • UNKRICH: Something's wrong in this world.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. And of course to represent Woody's broken arm, the trash can is full of just broken arms. So you see Mr. Potato Head's arm, you see Rocky's arm.
  • UNKRICH: Rockem Sockem Robots.
  • LASSETER: The arm from Rockem Sockem Robots, and an arm from a miscellaneous robot.
  • (Woody screams)
  • LASSETER: We needed to establish that Woody was put up on a shelf were things we're played with, things weren't touched for a very long time. And the best way visually to show that is the dust. But dust is really, really hard to do. And we ended up, after a lot of experimentation, having to make a tiny little particle and then having the computer distribute that over the entire shelf. There's like over two million dust particles on this shelf.
  • Wheezy: Well, I tried squeakin'. But I'm still broken. No one could hear me.
  • LASSETER: Joe Ranft is not only our story supervisor but he is the voice of Wheezy.
  • STANTON: Wheezy, the character itself is actually an idea we had in '91, two years before we really had the script going for Toy Story. We just loved this asthmatic squeeze toy penguin. We actually celebrated when we thought of putting him in this movie.
  • LASSETER: So we...
  • STANTON: "Yay, Wheezy!"
  • LASSETER: "We need a toy... We need a toy on the shelf that Woody can find that's long lost." We all looked at each other and went...
  • LASSETER, STANTON: "Wheezy!"
  • STANTON: He's like an old...
  • LASSETER: He's like an old friend. Yeah. It's just, it's hilarious.
  • Sarge: All civilians fall into position now! Single file! Let's move, move, move!
  • Buzz: Hamm?
  • Hamm: Here.
  • Buzz: Potato Head, Mr. and Mrs.?
  • Potato Heads: Here.
  • LASSETER: The yard sale and the toys being afraid of that really kind of is reminiscent of them being afraid of the birthday party in the original Toy Story.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, very similar kind of thing.
  • STANTON: It's really the other only thing to be afraid of.
  • (UNKRICH LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: It's a seasonal thing.
  • LASSETER: But, but unlike... Unlike Toy Story 1, which is about new toys coming in and being replaced, this is about a toy...
  • UNKRICH: Being discarded.
  • LASSETER: And that's what the yard sale represented. And in fact, we originally had Woody going out to the yard sale is kind of an accident and he fell out the window and slid down the roof and landed in a box. But we wanted to have it more motivated by his character. And he's desperately trying to prevent him being discarded, him being, you know... He's just so worried about this, and, and the whole reason that Wheezy exists in the story up on the shelf is an illustration of what's gonna happen to him.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: So you can see...
  • BRANNON: He feels like by going to rescue Wheezy he's gonna save himself.
  • LASSETER, STANTON: Exactly.
  • Mr. Potato Head ...nuts!
  • Slinky Dog: His arm ain't that bad.
  • Rex: Don't do it, Woody! We love you!
  • LASSETER: We wanted to establish that Buster was not just a dog. That he had more of a personality, especially around the toys. And so there's this upcoming scene when they look out to the yard sale and Woody says, "Okay, let's go, and act casual." And Steve Hunter was a great animator. We gave this to him and said, "Okay, Steve, just go to town with this," when he said, "Act casually," and he put so much personality into this dog, like completely overacting. And it gets a huge laugh with the audience each time.
  • UNKRICH: But we wanted it to still feel like a dog. We didn't want to cross into it being cartoony.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • UNKRICH: He found that perfect balance.
  • Bo Peep: See him?
  • Buzz: There he is.
  • LASSETER: In creating the yard sale, we went through just about every single model created in Toy Story. If you look, the saw horses with the door across it, that's Sid's desk.
  • BRANNON: There's a dog collar from the circus in Bug's Life.
  • LASSETER: You'll look up on the desk when she's selling a bunch of door locks, those are all the door locks from Sid's door.
  • UNKRICH: Some of the furniture out there is from Andy's living room...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • UNKRICH: ...in the first movie.
  • Woody: ...pal.
  • Wheezy: Bless you, Woody.
  • Woody: All right, now. Back to Andy's room. Hyah.
  • (Rex laughs)
  • Buzz: Way to go, cowboy.
  • Hamm: Woodster!
  • LASSETER: Of course the whole yard sale and getting Woody out to the yard sale was so that he could be found by a collector. Now the original idea of Toy Story 2 came from the fact that we are all big toy collectors, especially me. I have a huge toy collection in my office. And my sons, I have five sons, and four of them are young, they love to come to Daddy's work to play with Daddy's toys. As they come in and start playing with these collectible toys, I get freaked out, and I started thinking about what's it like from a toy's point of view to be collected. And out of thought came the idea for Toy Story 2. What about thinking of Woody being a collectible toy? And so the idea spawned from that of like, "What if, you know, Woody was very valuable, he still has his hat, and he's found by a collector?" And so as we started discussing this notion, we thought, "What about the Al of Al's Toy Barn?" Now you remember in, in the original Toy Story there's the Buzz Lightyear commercial, and right at the end of it there's a silly little tag of a cheesy toy store called Al's Toy Barn. You know...
  • UNKRICH: "Tri-county available at all Al's Toy Barn outlets in the tri-county area."
  • LASSETER: Right. And so that was the birth of Al McWhiggin.
  • BRANNON: Even the whole idea of having it be Al from's Al's Toy Barn and goes back to Buzz, because we, we thought it'd be really great to have a toy meet his identical, way back. I mean, that's something that happens to toys that humans never encounter. So we thought it would be fun to do that, and in order to naturally get the toys to run into a toy barn, we thought, "What if the owner is the kidnapper?"
  • LASSETER: Is... It's a collector.
  • BRANNON: Right.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Get him, Buzz.
  • (Rex whimpers)
  • Andy's Mom: Where's the red jacket?
  • (music playing)
  • LASSETER: In creating Woody's history, we wanted to establish that he was from a '50s TV show called Woody's Roundup. We thought, "Oh, that gives us such a rich universe to develop the whole '50s style." So we thought, "Well, if he's from the '50s TV show, Al would be a collector of '50s objects." And so that kind of led to the whole... The clothes he wears and especially the car he drives.
  • Bo Peep: Why would someone steal Woody?
  • LASSETER: In, in the story we wanted to keep the audience where Woody was, and keep you confused as an audience member as to what's going on. And so we just kind of started showing you snippets of what's happening...
  • UNKRICH: Where he's being taken.
  • LASSETER: ...where he's being taken, and in the storytelling is... I love this up shot for that reason.
  • UNKRICH: The sign says it all. You know, I mean, Woody's in the worst possible place he could be.
  • STANTON: Right, for a toy.
  • UNKRICH: No children.
  • STANTON: That's what's so great.
  • UNKRICH: We used to have a whole scene right after this, scene right after this where we followed Al up to the apartment and putting Woody into the case. And we finally realized we just didn't need it. It was much more evocative to have him just disappear in the building. And... Next time we saw Woody he was in the case, and we filled in the gaps in between.
  • Hamm: ...B, a composite sketch of the kidnapper.
  • BRANNON: Now, this sequence was one of the first in production because we knew it wouldn't change a lot. It was inevitable with our story line that the characters were going to... Find out Woody was kidnapped and they were gonna try to figure out who had taken him and why and go after him.
  • Hamm: Your eyes are in backyards. It went the other way.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Hey, put a cork in it.
  • Rex: How do you spell FBI?
  • LASSETER: I love the Shriner Lil' Tyke driving the car.
  • UNKRICH: Gotta get him in there.
  • LASSETER: I just love Etch-A-Sketch being alive that can draw so well, and how fast it can draw too. And that actually is a setup for later when he needs to reproduce the map...
  • UNKRICH: Copy the map from the Al's Toy Barn commercial.
  • Rex: What are you doing, Buzz?
  • Buzz: It's some sort of message encoded on that vehicle's I.D. tag.
  • Mr. Spell: Liz try bran.
  • Mr. Potato Head: It's just a license plate. It's just a jumble of letters.
  • Hamm: Yeah, and there were about 3.5 million registered cars in the tri-country area alone.
  • Mr. Spell: Lou's thigh burn.
  • LASSETER: Now, Buzz deciphering the license plate... Ash, I believe you have that exact license plate here in California.
  • BRANNON: Just by chance.
  • UNKRICH: So 49 of you out there in the U.S. can have that same license plate, just not in California.
  • BRANNON: Little kids throw rocks at my car, though.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • Rex: (screams) It's the chicken man!
  • Buzz: That's our guy.
  • Hamm: I knew there was something I didn't like about that chicken.
  • Al: Yeah, yeah, yeah...
  • LASSETER: I just love the transitions in Toy Story 2.
  • UNKRICH: Well, one of the things about how carefully crafter our movies are is that we're able to... Plan these transitions ahead of time. We don't have to find them in the editing. We can do some interesting tricky things like dissolving from Al on the Etch-A-Sketch to him in the suit in his apartment. We like to do stuff like that whenever we can.
  • (Woody grunts)
  • UNKRICH: When we were working on the movie earlier on we originally had Al's Toy Barn be halfway across town, but when we were making the movie efficient, and we didn't want to have characters to figure out how to get all the way across town, we were sitting in a meeting and they said, "Well, why don't we just put Al's Toy Barn right across the street from the apartment building?"
  • LASSETER: And it, it's funny. We thought, oh no. At first we said, "No," 'cause it's just too convenient, then we said, "Well, why not?"
  • UNKRICH: Let's make a joke out of it.
  • LASSETER: It's funny. In establishing the characters, the Woody's Roundup characters, we wanted to do it, each one, in a unique way. The first character you meet is Bullseye. Now Bullseye is Woody's horse. Woody hasn't been around for years, for decades, and to have this horse finally get his owner, we thought, "What would he want to do?" Well, he would want to ride with Woody on him. And so that was just... We said, "Let's take Woody for a wild ride through the apartment." And the next character you meet is Jessie, and she's so excited.
  • STANTON: We actually had to do a couple passes to get Jessie just right. And one of the luxuries is that we already knew we had Joan Cusack. And it was really the simple line from Joe Ranft, our story supervisor of, "What if she's Elly May?" And... Elly May from Beverly Hillbillies, and that sort of like triggered an idea of this really high highs and really low lows.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, she has high... High mountains and deep valleys emotionally.
  • STANTON: Exactly. And then I would watch this scene from In & Out where she's in the wedding dress, you know...
  • LASSETER: Joan. Joan Cusack.
  • STANTON: Yeah, yeah. Joan Cusack in the wedding, just screaming at the top of her lungs out in the middle of the street. And it, and it was like this little sort of touchstone I would look at every time before I write for her. It was just magic. She would just come right out, boom and, and...
  • LASSETER: Just yelling, "It's you! It's you, it's you!" I love that.
  • STANTON: She was great.
  • LASSETER: We wanted to, to keep the audience in the point of view of Woody through all this to where it's like first he's taken for a wild ride through the room, then he's met by this crazy woman yelling, "It's you, it's you, it's you!" And then he meets the only sane voice of the bunch, and the guy's in a box. And I am so proud of that, more than anything else, is that, that as a toy collector we all know the most valuable a toy can be is mint in the box.
  • UNKRICH: Mint in the box.
  • LASSETER: But from the point of view of a toy, and it wants to be played with by a child more than anything else in the world. The most tragic thing of all is a toy that's never sold. And so we thought about, "What about the dichotomy and the bitterness deep down, of a toy that's never, you know, never been bought, never been played with?" But now he's extremely valuable because he's in that.
  • STANTON: What I loved is they were this little triptych in that the three of them sort of covered the entire range of how you might respond to not being played with. You had Bullseye that was eager to kind of leap back into the world of being played with. You had somebody that had been harmed, Jessie, that never wanted to risk getting harmed again. And then, and you had another toy that had never experienced it, and convinced themselves that they were better off for it.
  • LASSETER: And he... He's kind of the leader of the three and he's convinced all of them that it's better not to be played with, it's best that you be collected because that's where his value is.
  • TV announcer: Cowboy Crunchies. The only cereal that's sugar...
  • UNKRICH: So one of my favorite things in the movie is this whole Woody's Roundup show, how we made it look like an old kinescope. So many people I talk to see this and they assume we just photographed some puppets and put them on this TV set. And I think it's so great that it is all computer animation. Every little last thing you're seeing on the TV is actually animation that we processed to make it look like an old, an old kinescope. And I love that we used this multi-million dollar technology to create this, this old, black and white, cruddy, beat-up piece of film.
  • Chorus: Woody's Roundup.
  • LASSETER: This channel changing scene I think is probably one of the funniest scenes in the movie at least I think so, 'cause it is so accurate to, to the way guys are. 
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Andrew came up with idea originally, when was it? When was it for?
  • STANTON: Well, it was for A Bug's Life. We wanted to do some marketing commercials and thought it would be helpful if the Toy Story characters introduced the Bug's Life characters. And we thought they might watch it on TV, like they were searching for the trailer for A Bug's Life.
  • UNKRICH: A lot of these gags in the writing came right out of those proposed commercials.
  • STANTON: And, and you know, Jeff Pidgeon, is one of our secret weapon story artists and writers, came up with part of the idea of going around the horn. And then I remember we were all talking over one another and I threw out, you know, "It's in the 40s." It was...
  • LASSETER: Oh.
  • STANTON: ...a perfect moment of group Pixar writing.
  • LASSETER: And, and...
  • STANTON: It's one of the best lines I think we've ever come up with.
  • LASSETER: Oh, I know. Like, "Too late. I'm in the 40s. Got to go around the horn."
  • STANTON: "It's faster."
  • LASSETER: Yeah. But you know, it's funny how, how when we talk to couples, every guy relates to it and every woman relates to it because they can't stand the fact that guys go so fast with the channel changer.
  • Buzz: ...do my best, son.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Okay, fellas. Let's roll.
  • UNKRICH: You look in the background, you'll see all the leaves on the trees are billowing and gently swaying in the wind. And the trees weren't like that in the first Toy Story, but we did all kinds of research on A Bug's Life and figured out how to make grass and leaves move like that and we took all of those plants and brought them forward into Toy Story 2.
  • LASSETER: Now this line that Mrs. Potato Head says right here...
  • Mrs. Potato Head: Don't talk to any toy you don't know!
  • LASSETER: And that was added late because at a recording session with Estelle Harris, most of Mrs. Potato Head's lines were sweet, lovey towards Mr. Potato Head. And all of a sudden she said something really loud as a joke, and I loved it. I never thought about Mrs. Potato Head just yelling. And we came up with this idea actually at the recording session.
  • UNKRICH: We thought we should have her say something like, "Don't talk to any strangers," is what we came up with. But then Estelle...
  • LASSETER: Estelle is the one that added, "Don't talk to any toys you don't know."
  • Jessie: ...dynamite.
  • Stinky Pete: Holy tarnation!
  • LASSETER: We had so much fun creating this show and just making it nicely cheesy, even with the critters coming in. Watch one of them get stuck on the tree and knocks it over.
  • (UNKRICH LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Even the schoolhouse, you know...
  • UNKRICH: Everything's wobbly.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, wobbles back and forth. And this is Tom Hanks at his best right here.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: He is so great.
  • UNKRICH: This whole show used to go on much, much longer. We ended up cutting it down just to keep the movie moving. I mean I could just watch this stuff all day.
  • STANTON: Yeah. We could've kept going.
  • Stinky Pete: You're putting out the flame...
  • LASSETER: As we cut back, of course, he passes over the same outhouse. There it is again.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: Jumping over the Grand Canyon.
  • STANTON: I love that. That is like the epitome of every cliffhanger in the old days.
  • LASSETER: And, and what's amazing when you see the background here, there's a seam that goes by. We actually added a seam, as though the clouds are just...
  • UNKRICH: Like an endless loop.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • Woody: Hey, hey, hey. What happened?
  • LASSETER: The TV set is based on my Philco Predicta TV that's in my office. They came... We measured all the dimensions of it.
  • UNKRICH: It's not just based on it, it is it.
  • LASSETER (LAUGHS): I know.
  • STANTON: Down to the inch.
  • LASSETER: It's, it's just, it's just great.
  • Woody: ...why cancel it?
  • Stinky Pete: Two words, sput-nik. Once the astronauts went up, children only wanted to play with space toys.
  • Woody: I know how...
  • STANTON: There's just so many, cool...
  • LASSETER: Oh, this whole collection.
  • UNKRICH: This is like a showcase for this beautiful stuff.
  • LASSETER: The lunchbox, you know, and the, the Thermos.
  • UNKRICH: The stamped-tin bank.
  • LASSETER: Oh, and I had spoons just like those. They were Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear.
  • Woody: ...good-looking guy.
  • (Woody and Jessie laugh)
  • BRANNON: We scripted this section, but I remember when we recorded Tom, we wanted to get some ad-libs out of him, so we mocked up some of these props...
  • LASSETER: And had pictures.
  • BRANNON: And play with them.
  • UNKRICH: We just, we just showed it to him...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • UNKRICH: ...and he rambled on and on and it was great.
  • LASSETER: I just... I just stood in front of him with the pictures, and just held them up. And he didn't even know what that was, started figuring out "What is it? Oh, it's a... Oh, it's a bank! Cool!"
  • UNKRICH: And then I came back, and I took all this great stuff and, and cut it together into this great little bit here with him.
  • Woody: A record player! I have seen any of these in ages.
  • UNKRICH: This is great. We don't know if any children today even know what record players are.
  • BRANNON: It's called a record player. It's a precursor to the CD player.
  • Woody: Hop on, cowgirl! Face fast!
  • LASSETER: This is so fun to play with the record player just like we used to. You know, everybody who grew up with record players, you would play it fast, you'd play it slow, play it backwards. And I love the detail. Even to the... If you look at the label in the center of the record player, it's Woody's nose, the hole is right where Woody's nose comes in. So the spindle looks like Woody's nose.
  • STANTON: Which they did do on a lot of kids' albums.
  • Woody: What museum?
  • Stinky Pete: The museum.
  • LASSETER: You know, the acting of, of these characters, the new characters, is so great, and, and Kelsey Grammer does the voice of The Prospector and he gives such a rich resonance to it. And in, in the beginning, you know, he is so kind and so wise. And then of course, that completely disguises the turn that will come later. It's such brilliant acting.
  • Jessie: Can't go. I can't do storage again.
  • BRANNON: We were lucky to have so many great female animators this time around too, but we didn't have as many on Toy Story.
  • LASSETER: We worked so hard to make a strong female character in this film. It's something... You know, the first movie was made by a bunch of guys about the toys they had as kids and how they played with toys.
  • BRANNON: To play with toys.
  • UNKRICH: It's very much a boys' movie.
  • LASSETER: You know, but, but we really worked hard... Helene Plotkin and Karen Robert Jackson were the producers of Toy Story 2. They were really encouraging us to have strong female characters. My wife would not let me come home if we didn't have a strong female character.
  • UNKRICH: And then Joan Cusack loved that. And she said some of the great stuff in this movie was came completely from Joan, a lot of the story ideas, 'cause she helped us further strengthen the, the idea of having a strong female character in the film.
  • Jessie: ...was you.
  • Woody: It's not like that, okay?
  • STANTON: Now you're at the point in movies where it's tough for a filmmaker to keep it alive because all the information's out now. All the details, the very last one, which is going to Japan, is out. We know everything about the movie, all the dilemmas. And we have what's called the second act sag, where "How do you keep interest in the movie? Because why doesn't Woody just leave now? He, he knows the whole deal and he wants to go." So we had to come up with what you want is a mini-dilemma, something that has its own little beginning, middle and end, and finishes take up about a minute or two of screen time, but its outcome furthers the bigger plot of the movie. And so we came up with, "Let's remove his arm, let's have his arm be taken away." It rips off, and Al has it. And now there's no way he can leave until he gets that item. So it's not so much about some big value dilemma of, "Do I stay or do I go?" 'Cause we wanted to save that for later. It's about you...
  • LASSETER, STANTON: Keep him there.
  • UNKRICH: "How do I get my arm back?"
  • STANTON: "How do I get my arm back?" And it's great.
  • LASSETER: We had, we had so many people say, "Oh, you can't remove... You can't remove Woody's arm." And we were, we said, you know...
  • BRANNON: Buzz did it. People...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: Buzz did it in the first movie.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, we lost his arm. So it's another, another thing that connects Woody and Buzz together. The similarity. Now, it, it, it is actually quite horrible because of the way Woody's reacting but it's why we added this great line, and beautifully read by Kelsey Grammer, where he, you know, The Prospector says, "Come over here and let me look at it. Oh, it's just a popped seam."
  • STANTON: It sort of defused... Defused it.
  • LASSETER: The whole, right there...
  • UNKRICH: Defused it and makes it not morbid and it brings it back into the whole toy realm.
  • LASSETER: "Oh, it's just a popped seam. Easily repaired." So that means, it's like, "Oh, you're gonna be okay," right then and there. And so...
  • STANTON: It's no different than what you do to kids when they have a big scrape. "Oh, it's nothing, it's nothing." You know what I mean? It's just...
  • UNKRICH: But he's, but he's still gotta...
  • LASSETER: Driving to the emergency room.
  • STANTON (LAUGHING): Right.
  • UNKRICH: But he's still gonna get that arm back.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: You know, thoughout this movie we were trying to figure out where we have the great music by Randy Newman or just sound. And this sequence here, you know, Gary suggested, "Let me do it just with sound," and he adds such a feeling of danger and that these little toys are out in this big empty world and there's all this rich sound like stories going on way off in the distance.
  • BRANNON: Dogs barking, sirens going. It makes it feel like not, not such a great neighborhood.
  • UNKRICH: That's what's so great about working with Gary Rydstrom. He's the best sound designer in the business. And, and he can take material and take to a whole other level and, and make little mini-stories out of just putting in some fascinating sound effects.
  • Buzz: ...need. We will not rest until...
  • LASSETER: When we came up with the, the transition of the American flag, though, we realized now this wouldn't work in other countries. So this is one area, and what's great about our, our, our technology and our, our medium, is we went back in and for all of the foreign versions we have created a different transition there. It's, it's a glob with fireworks going off.
  • BRANNON: And a, and a whole new anthem it's called the One World Anthem by Randy Newman.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • (Al snores)
  • STANTON: And now we get into a sequence that was pretty much on the lap of Jeff Pidgeon, one of our storyboard extarordinare guys. He just came up with this, this, this brilliant idea...
  • UNKRICH: It's one drawing. It's one drawing. 
  • LASSETER: One drawing.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • BRANNON: Woody on top of Al.
  • UNKRICH: Al... Al laying on the couch and, and Bullseye was licking the orange Cheeto dust of his fingertips and we just cracked up.
  • STANTON (LAUGHS): Right.
  • LASSETER: And that became a whole sequence.
  • Woody: Bullseye. Bullseye, go, go, go, go.
  • LASSETER: And great animation on Bullseye right here by Rich Quade. It's just, you know, in developing Bullseye's character we wanted him... Originally, remember that, Ash? We... He was going to talk.
  • BRANNON: He had a voice, yeah.
  • LASSETER: He had a voice. And then we thought, "No, no, no, no, no. Let's make him be like a giant puppy dog."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: "Extremely loyal puppy dog," and that gave him a whole different aspect of a toy being alive, you know, that he's more of an animal. And I just love the way he tiptoed across that minefield.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: This is great.
  • UNKRICH: This is one of those...
  • LASSETER: Tim Hittle...
  • BRANNON: Tim Hittle.
  • STANTON: Yes.
  • LASSETER: Tim Hittle did that.
  • UNKRICH: This is one of the most amazing shots in the entire movie.
  • STANTON: He still looks real to me. Al...
  • BRANNON: He's got nose hairs.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, it, it's amazing how, how real the, he looks.
  • Woody: Psst. Bullseye. Cut it out. Stop it. Psst. Stop it. Stop it.
  • LASSETER: I just love that.
  • Woody: Stop it! Stop it.
  • LASSETER: All of the shaders on Al, and it just, it's incredible. The 5:00 shadow.
  • STANTON: It freaks us out too, guys.
  • (LASSETER AND UNKRICH LAUGH)
  • BRANNON: This is... This is John Kahrs animating Woody's reaction.
  • LASSETER: This is so funny.
  • BRANNON: One of the best.
  • LASSETER: It's that silent burp that we all know and it smells extremely...
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • UNKRICH: We spent about... We spent about two hours in post-production layering those sounds with Gary, trying to find the most revolting, evil, foul-smelling belch.
  • LASSETER: And for those of you who have surround sound, you'll notice how it travels across your room.
  • UNKRICH: And it's in your subwoofer.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • Al: No, officer! I swear.
  • LASSETER: When Al wakes up, all of this is amazing performance by, by Wayne Knight. And a lot of this was just ad-libbing. We had very little of it, it scripted, and he just started coming up with stuff about the whole, you know, off...
  • LASSETER, UNKRICH: "No, officer, I swear."
  • LASSETER: And then to even the point of looking around, it just like, he's getting so mad at himself... Where did he put it? Oh, here it is. And that was...
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: We barely edited that. That was, like, Wayne.
  • STANTON: It cracks me up every time I hear it.
  • (Al yawns)
  • STANTON: So this is where we have advanced the main plot of getting the arm back. He now thinks Jessie did it, and it's just further enforcing this, sort of, misdirection that we want to give the audience that Jessie is behind wanting to keep Woody there.
  • Jessie: Say that again.
  • Woody: (enuciating) If the boot fits.
  • Jessie: Okay...
  • LASSETER: Tom Hanks' performance there, when he accentuated the, the "T," he was so funny when he did that. He actually spelled out everything.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: He's amazing. I mean, I'm sure we said this on the Toy Story commentary, but you know, every take he does is good. It's just which one do you want to use?
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. Whenever I'm editing Tom Hanks for these movies, I feel like I'm sifting through a basket of diamonds...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • UNKRICH: ...trying to just put together the most amazing performance. Everything he says is so wonderful.
  • LASSETER: He gives us choices, too, which I find amazing. He will read a line many different ways, knowing that, that we will then cut it together.
  • Woody: ...that way. It's just that Andy...
  • Jessie: Andy, Andy, Andy. That's all he ever talks about.
  • LASSETER: This upcoming scene transition has got one of our little Easter eggs in it. If you look up on the branch...
  • UNKRICH: Upper right-hand corner.
  • LASSETER: Upper right-hand corner. ...you see Heimlich crawling along. Heimlich from A Bug's Life. Also if you see this rusty can over, over near the bushes, that is the bug bar from A Bug's Life. As is, frankly, all of the plants in the sequence is from A Bug's Life.
  • Hamm: Hey, guys.
  • UNKRICH: There's the bug bar over on the right.
  • Buzz: Not now, Hamm.
  • Rex: Oh, I love riddles. Why?
  • LASSETER: Wally Shawn is so funny.
  • STANTON: You know, you actually have to become like this fair Solomon about what toys get what lines 'cause they're such an ensemble cast. And I constantly find myself giving lines to Rex because he's just so fun. You know, just... The dynamic of being a wimp dinosaur, just it seems endless, for and with Wally's voice. So I always kinda go, "Okay, we gotta take some of Rex's lines away, give it to somebody else."
  • LASSETER: And John Ratzenberger, of course, just like will nail every line, as well as Don Rickles and Jim Varney.
  • (Rex whimpers)
  • UNKRICH: This was the... This was the very first sequence that was animated in, in Toy Story 2, was this whole crossing-the-road sequence.
  • BRANNON: But for reasons mentioned earlier, yeah, it was actually in a different location. It wasn't right next to Al's Toy Barn.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. Before we made that decision to move Al's Toy Barn to be right across the street, all this animation had been done for this whole sequence, but it was in a completely different location.
  • LASSETER: It was kind of like an expressway. It wasn't even in the...
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, it was like an industrial area. One of the great... Another great thing about working in our medium is we're able to pretty much take all the work that had been done part parcel and, and just now plunk it here downtown by Al's apartment building.
  • Buzz: Go.
  • LASSETER: I just love, love this. This is great. It's also brilliant work between Randy Newman in the music and Gary Rydstrom in the sound because the way that they worked in, in... We were very scared of this sequence because we knew it was going to be extremely loud. Everything about it was going to be loud. And we thought, "This is gonna be difficult if, if the music is written all the way through it." And so they came up with an idea of just, that Randy would score the music for just when the cones are moving and let Gary have time of all of the big crashes and the noise.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, it's really great. We learned a lot of lessons on the other movies and we were very... John insisted on this movie that, that, that Gary and Randy be together in the same meetings and that we have a dialogue between the two of them so that we can have a nice tapestry of sound and music working throughout the whole movie.
  • LASSETER: In the original story, we had Al as the collector also restore Woody. And as we started developing the character of Al and the kind of character he is, we, we realized, wait a minute, wait a minute. He wouldn't have the ability to actually do all this restoration on the toy. He would just pick up a cell phone and call somebody.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: So we started thinking, well, okay, we need... Then we need another character. Now this was kinda late in the game. And the producers and production managers just started...
  • STANTON: No.
  • LASSETER: ...freaking out because...
  • STANTON: No.
  • LASSETER: ...you can't have another...
  • STANTON: No.
  • LASSETER: ...human character, design one.
  • STANTON: No.
  • LASSETER: We said, "Wait a minute. Let's just use the character of Geri from Geri's Game." It was an Academy Award-winning short film that we did, and it was perfect. And so we brought it in, and we, and we also realized this is great. This is like an in-joke that kids will get because Geri's Game was on, as you all know you're watching this, it was on A Bug's Life videotape.
  • STANTON: It's like when the Beverly Hillbillies went to Petticoat Junction, it was like just blew my mind when they crossed.
  • (BOTH LAUGHING)
  • LASSETER: Or when Batman was battling The Green Hornet.
  • STANTON: Exactly! Now, I mean it.
  • LASSETER: Now, tell me, would Robin really win a fight against Kato?
  • STANTON: No. No. Okay.
  • LASSETER: Come on.
  • STANTON: We're gonna waste the whole DVD talking about this.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • STANTON: When I was writing this to my son that had turned six and he was into videogames finally, and he really pushed himself...
  • BRANNON: Really waiting for that one.
  • STANTON: ...into reading because he wanted to, to read the manuals for how to do these games. And so, I ended up having to read them to him sometimes. And that really got me get, getting the idea of letting Rex find this, find this manual, find how to do all these things and allowed him to talk about Zurg all the time and it would help deluded Buzz get confused.
  • UNKRICH: And then, and go with them.
  • LASSETER: This sequence we're very proud of from a cinematic standpoint becuase it actually... It actually introduced sort of a new way of working for us, where Lee would work with the layout department and they just kind of created all, different, kinds of shots.
  • UNKRICH: I told them basically, you know, I wanted this really lyrical kind of feeling, the camera always moving, gliding around everything. And we just let them be really, really creative and come up with great coverage, like you would shoot in a live action movie.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, I mean, we had so much more layout footage that was going to be used. But actually, you and David were able... David Sall...
  • UNKRICH: David Salter, the, the editor, and Edie Bleiman, the other editor.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, you guys were actually able to cut this more like live action.
  • UNKRICH: Mmm-hmm, exactly. It shows, and I think it's some of... Some of the most sophisticated cinematic work we've ever done at Pixar.
  • STANTON: Yeah, you really feel it.
  • LASSETER: This scene coming up right here, where Andy gets painted over, I'm so proud of that because it gets an audible gasp, you know, every screening.
  • STANTON: And it says, and it says volumes. To me it says more than anything else...
  • Geri: ...only.
  • BRANNON: The voice of Geri is Jonathan Harris.
  • LASSETER: That's right!
  • BRANNON: From A Bug's Life.
  • UNKRICH: Played Manny.
  • BRANNON: It was a great experience on, on A Bug's Life. And he wanted to work with us again.
  • STANTON: We wanted to work with him again.
  • BRANNON: And.
  • UNKRICH: Some Bug's Life toys in the background.
  • STANTON: All right. Now we get into one of those, "Thank goodness we thought of this idea" subplots of... We, we came up... We had a, actually a point where we didn't have the Buzzes get switched early on in coming up with this movie.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, Buzz just met him, had like a funny scene, and that was the end of it.
  • STANTON: And it, and it...
  • LASSETER: My favorite shot. My favorite shot. Wait. Shh, shh.
  • STANTON: Ahh.
  • LASSETER: Okay, go ahead.
  • STANTON: And it dawned on us that half the reason it was so fun to Buzz in the first movie because he was deluded. And by having him switch...
  • LASSETER: Absolutely.
  • STANTON: ...with another Buzz, it brought back deluded Buzz.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. That was a fundamental problem. Everything was so funny about Buzz in the first movie, we couldn't do because Buzz...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • UNKRICH: Buzz's head was smaller and he knew that he was a toy.
  • STANTON: And, and what was great is that we were able to make him more deluded.
  • LASSETER (LAUGHING): In the first reel we pushed him. We really pushed him.
  • STANTON: And come on, we're all fans of Star Trek and "The Enemy Within" is the best episode of Star Trek.
  • LASSETER: Good Kirk.
  • STANTON: Where good Kirk meets evil Kirk.
  • LASSETER: That's it.
  • STANTON: And you had to do this. It just was meant to be.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: I just love the fact that Potato Head needs to drive and he's terrible at it.
  • UNKRICH: This is John's joke here. It's just, it's just so funny.
  • Buzz: Am I really that fat?
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: It is funny.
  • STANTON: I laugh.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • UNKRICH: I'm serious.
  • Buzz #2: Hoy-ya!
  • Buzz: Ow. What are you doing?
  • Buzz #2: You're in direct violation of code 6404.5.
  • BRANNON: That code is actually the California no smoking regulation.
  • STANTON: Is it?
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • BRANNON: We were sitting in a restaurant, when we wrote the line.
  • UNKRICH: The importance of research.
  • Buzz #2: Buzz Lightyear to Star Command...
  • LASSETER: We actually did quite a bit of work to get Buzz's face smashed up against the glass. That was quite a little effort there by our wonderful effects team to do that.
  • UNKRICH: Love the cheesy little rocket going around.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, and the sound Gary added...
  • STANTON: The sound effect just plussed it twice as much.
  • LASSETER: We wanted to make, make it purposely cheesy just to show that this, he is just a toy and how deluded...
  • UNKRICH: He's just completely lost his mind.
  • (Buzzes fight)
  • UNKRICH: When we came up with the idea for this big Barbie beach party we knew we wanted to have all the girls dancing around and doing all these different dances, and we had to come up with different dances for everybody. And I remembered watching this Elvis movie with Ann-Margret, when I was growing up, where she did this really...
  • LASSETER: Viva Las Vegas.
  • UNKRICH: Viva Las Vegas. She did this minimalist little dance, and if you look at the Barbie... Right here in the foreground.
  • LASSETER: Oh, yeah.
  • UNKRICH: Yell out. That's the Ann-Margaret dance.
  • Barbies: How low can you go?
  • LASSETER: The voice of Barbie...
  • UNKRICH: Of every single Barbie.
  • LASSETER: ...is Jodi Benson, who does the voice of Ariel, the Little Mermaid. And she was fantastic.
  • Hamm: ...Al of Al's Toy Barn?
  • Tour Guide Barbie: I can help.
  • (Barbies laugh)
  • Tour Guide Barbie: I'm Tour Guide Barbie. Please...
  • LASSETER: I used to have G.I. Joes and my sister had Barbies. And my G.I. Joe would climb in his jeep and drive down the hall and take Barbies out on dates, but Barbies couldn't bend their legs and so they couldn't fit into G.I. Joe's jeep. That just always inspired me by how stiff to animate Barbie. If you notice, as Tour Guide Barbie drives, her fingers are completely stiff the whole time.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • UNKRICH: They're all fused together.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • Rex: (screams) It says how you defeat Zurg!
  • LASSETER: Our effects department had pretty a tough job ahead of them when we came up with this idea that they would run into this container of Super Balls and just have them bouncing everywhere, but they did a fantastic job. And Gary, again, with the sound just like carried it through with, with the balls bouncing all around the audience.
  • Rex: My source of power! No! Come back!
  • UNKRICH: How can you have a dinosaur chase a car without doing this? Jurassic Park.
  • LASSETER: This is... This is my favorite reference, movie reference in all the film because Rex is so opposite of the T. rex...
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER ...in Jurassic Park. And also he was inspired by it because Jurassic Park came out when we were developing the first Toy Story.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: And we had the idea of, let's put a dinosaur in there because of how cool that T. rex was.
  • Buzz: You don't realize what you're doing!
  • LASSETER: This line right here...
  • Tour Guide Barbie: And this is the Buzz Lightyear aisle. Back in 1995, shortsighted retailers did not order enough dolls to meet demand.
  • LASSETER: ...is probably my favorite line in the movie because it's true.
  • (STANTON AND UNKRICH LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: There was such a huge shortage, as we all know, of Buzz Lightyears after the original Toy Story came out. None of the toy stores would buy any. In fact, you know, they, they put orders in for only 60,000 Buzz Lightyears in all of the United States and Canada. And Albert Chan, who makes Thinkway Toys and made the Buzz Lightyears, has ended up making more than nine million Buzz Lightyears since then. So they kind of under-ordered in the original Buzz Lightyears.
  • Al: (chuckles) This is like printing my own...
  • LASSETER: We casted a great actor, Wayne Knight, to do the voice of Al, and he brought so much personality to this guy, and it just a pure, like love of, of, of collecting toys. And he just was really into it. And every time we recorded, I couldn't believe how much effort he put into this, this performance, and it comes through. It just... Every time Al's on the screen it just comes alive.
  • Jessie: Great. Now you can go.
  • LASSETER: We animated Woody in this sequence to be about as annoying as possible.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Just so Jessie would like... She's so mad at him, she just would, like... You know, they have this, this... This is the point in the relationship where they just can't stand each other. You know that she's been really mean to him and, you know... He's been...
  • LASSETER, UNKRICH: He's been nasty to her.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • UNKRICH: Frustrated.
  • LASSETER: And it's Bullseye that kind of like softens Woody, 'cause Bullseye is just a sweetheart, you know.
  • STANTON: If you go back and track this, you realize how manipulative The Prospector actually is. Because his whole motivation to get him, Woody to go over and talk to Jessie is nothing other than to...
  • UNKRICH: Keep Woody there.
  • STANTON: Yeah. Keep Woody there, you know.
  • UNKRICH: And that was, that's actually the last... It was a very delicate balance to have, to have us trust The Prospector without ever tipping our hat that he was up to no good, yet when we reveal that he's a bad guy, and not having it come completely out of nowhere.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, and when he... When that happens you can go back and look at everything he says to Woody, and he's slowly mainpulating Woody.
  • UNKRICH: There's a subtext to everything. And it all... It all kinda makes sense in the grand scheme.
  • LASSETER: This leads into, I think, one of the, the best uses of, of a song in, in, in any movie. We were working very hard on this sequence where Jessie relates her backstory of being a toy that was really loved by a girl named Emily. And it was exact, we wanted it to be an exact parallel to how Andy loves Woody. And every time she would say the story, she would tell the story, it lost some emotion, and we were sitting in a meeting once and we said, "What about a song?" "What about a song?" And, you know, we, we, we don't like to have characters break out in song in, in our films. We like to have the songs, you know, really reinforce the emotion of, of the scene. And it just fit so well. And so we met with Randy Newman, and I think this is one of the best things he has ever written. And we... He wrote it actually very fast. But I remember telling him, "Randy, this does not have a happy ending. This song has to be sad." And, and he just did a wonderful job, and I tell you, probably one of the, the, the highlights of my career will always be the recording session between Randy Newman and Sarah McLachlan. It was in Vancouver, and it was just, just him on the piano and she singing, and the two of them alone in the, in the studio. And it was so special, and it just brought tears to our eyes to what, how much emotion she brought to this song. And I knew, I said, "Oh, we have to have the visuals support how beautiful this song is."
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. Sharon Calahan, our, our director of photography, did just a gorgeous job giving this a, just a, kind of a luminescent feeling of, of old bittersweet memories.
  • LASSETER: And there's, there's a glow, a softness to it, that, that she added to this. And the art direction was fun, where we started with, with, really, more '50s, early '60s sort of cowboy motif, and then went to more later '60s sort of music motifs. And, again, the dust. You know, the stacking the dust on underneath, just to give the sense like she's been there a long time.
  • STANTON: One of the nice sort of dual things that happened in this emotionally is that not only does it tap into people's memories of the toy they forgot, but it just taps into separation of somebody that you love. And so it affects parents as well. You really think about...
  • UNKRICH: About your kids growing up.
  • STANTON: ...kids growing up and leaving.
  • LASSETER: Yeah...
  • STANTON: But for us it's the doll, and her owner is leaving her.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. My, my oldest son went off to college not too long ago, and the emotion that we had when he left, and, and I just kept thinking back that it's like... It was yesterday I took him to first grade. And Tom Hanks, you know, mentioned to me, and he says that, you know that, that, that he was so impressed that here's a story about toys, you know, being played with by kids but all I could think about was my kids, you know, during this sequence.
  • STANTON: And that's intentional.
  • UNKRICH: This was the most brilliant work that Joan did on the movie.
  • Jessie: You never forget kids like Emily...
  • LASSETER: The recording session, I'll never forget, it was in Chicago.
  • UNKRICH: We all flew to Chicago.
  • BRANNON: Three Kleenex boxes.
  • LASSETER: Oh, my goodness. Everybody in the recording... She was in tears while she was acting this. And I had tears rolling down my face. And I turned and looked at everybody else in the room had tears rolling down our, our faces 'cause she just... Even though it wasn't very many words, it was so emotional and, and it was really, really special.
  • Stinky Pete: How long will it last, Woody? Do you really think Andy is gonna...
  • STANTON: This is my favorite cut in the movie because the one image of looking down that dark vent and hearing, you know sorta that haunting sort of wind, it just encapsulates the entire dilemma of Woody.
  • BRANNON: That's what you do to people in that.
  • STANTON: Dark, scary future of uncertainty, or this comfortable, warm friends to stay with. And I just think... I just love it when things can capture the entire meat of a movie without being...
  • UNKRICH: In an image.
  • STANTON: Yeah. Hitting you on the head, being expositional or anything.
  • LASSETER: Well, yeah. In fact Sharon Calahan actually warmed up the lighting in this sequence to have more of that contrast. It's always...
  • UNKRICH: To feel more inviting.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. It's always been very, very cold and, and, and blue in that room. But in the sequence she warmed it up just to make that decision more easily made by Woody. So after, after this, this sequence which is full of emotion, we really needed to have some laughs to bring us back. And of course, you know, we had this sequence and... We had, had, had built the Rockem Sockem Robots for a completely different part of the movie, earlier in, in the Toy Barn sequence. And we thought, "Why don't we use them here?" And so Lee and I did the voice. I'm the blue guy, right?
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. And I'm the red guy.
  • LASSETER: Right. But there's something little special about the red guy. Right, Ash?
  • BRANNON: It's the blue guy.
  • LASSETER: The blue guy?
  • BRANNON: You can't see it here 'cause his ear's turned away. But we modeled this about the time of the Big Tyson-Holyfield fight when Tyson bit Holyfield's ear off.
  • LASSETER: And so the blue guy's...
  • BRANNON: And so. He's missing a little bit of his ear.
  • UNKRICH: Got a little notch.
  • LASSETER: The blue guy is missing part of his ears.
  • UNKRICH: But you can't see it. You'll just have to trust us.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • Slinky Dog: It's him.
  • Hamm: Chicken man.
  • (Al laughs)
  • Buzz #2: Funny, he doesn't look like poultry.
  • Slinky Dog: That's the kidnapper, all right.
  • (Al laughs)
  • Buzz #2: Kidnapper...
  • UNKRICH: I just love... This just like sinks it home and reminds the audience that this is not the regular Buzz, this is...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • UNKRICH: ...insane Buzz.
  • BRANNON: Well, it was important to remind people all the time. I mean, all you had going for you was, other than the acting, was the helmet and the belt to remind you.
  • LASSETER: And, and it is so funny that, that we were able to really push him, too. And, and, and, the... You know, and you, but you, but you bought that Andy's toys didn't get it.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: Like, he is such a lunatic...
  • UNKRICH: It's Buzz. They're with Buzz.
  • STANTON: Yeah. Even from us, from a writing and, and filmmaking standpoint, we're just so happy to see deluded Buzz back. We're just, coming up with many things as we could. It was just so fun again.
  • LASSETER: One of the funniest lines is, "Where'd you get the cool belt, Buzz?" "Well, they're standard issue."
  • LASSETER, UNKRICH: "Slotted pig."
  • STANTON: Right, right.
  • (Al humming)
  • STANTON: This is another... You know, I always like to lead people to the... A certain expectation and then rip the rug out from under them, leading with no idea how you're gonna get out of something, doing that with these doors.
  • UNKRICH: And then right at that moment take it just a little further.
  • BRANNON: And add a monkey.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Add a monkey.
  • STANTON: Always helps.
  • LASSETER: Always helps. Monkeys are funny.
  • STANTON: I always... There's such a big groan from the audience when he hits that.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. And then the... I just love this scene, too. He's... This little toy jumping on this, this rubber mat. It's so futile.
  • STANTON: Oh, yeah. Then there's the jumping and they see him park across the street.
  • LASSETER: Across the street. Just across the street, oh.
  • STANTON: Now, Lee.
  • UNKRICH: Yes.
  • STANTON: The Zurg doll.
  • UNKRICH: Yes. (LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: This whole idea of seeing through the back of the eye...
  • UNKRICH: My favorite toy, bar none, when I was growing up was my Six Million Dollar Man doll.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • UNKRICH: And the Six Million Dollar Man had a little hole in the back of his head which you could look through to see...
  • STANTON: Steve Austin's.
  • UNKRICH: ...with Steve Austin's bionic vision. And I am so happy.
  • STANTON: So for all of you that had that doll, that's why this is in here.
  • UNKRICH: Here we go.
  • LASSETER: "Look Here."
  • UNKRICH: Into the eye.
  • LASSETER: There we go.
  • UNKRICH: And this is the same as the control panel that Zurg has at the beginning.
  • LASSETER: You go back to the beginning. You see the control panel's in exactly the same shape as that, that point of view. They're both called "Zurg Vision." This is one of my favorite deluded Buzz Lightyear bits.
  • Buzz #2: No time to lose!
  • LASSETER: That's great. The dashboard is amazing on that car.
  • STANTON: They do it with computers.
  • Buzz #2: He's assending in the vertical transporter. All right, everyone. Hang on. We're gonna blast through the roof.
  • LASSETER: I love this right here.
  • Rex: Uh, Buzz?
  • LASSETER: The pause is just great.
  • Buzz #2: ...and beyond!
  • LASSETER: And Randy. Randy hit the eye opening with that little bit of music. He's amazing!
  • (Mr. Potato Head grunts)
  • Buzz #2: I don't understand. Somehow my fuel cells have gone dry.
  • BRANNON: This was some of the first deluded Buzz animation we did for the film. We wanted to take him over the top, of course, and a lot of the inspiration came from Bob Peterson's storyboards.
  • STANTON: They're amazing.
  • LASSETER: They're so funny.
  • UNKRICH: He just did all these really extreme poses. His arms would be up in the air.
  • LASSETER: Just silly, too. And just like even if he's pointing one direction, it's like both hands up and both hands straight out.
  • BRANNON: A finger is not enough for pointing.
  • LASSETER: No.
  • BRANNON: Use both arms.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • BRANNON: Then you give it to Angus MacLane, one of our animators. And he just took it over the top.
  • LASSETER: We started using Angus, to bring him over to other animators' work stations and he would act out the way deluded Buzz would do something. And it was so hilarious 'cause we have all this video footage of Angus acting things out, and it just is hilarious.
  • UNKRICH: It just inspired all the other animators who worked on deluded Buzz.
  • BRANNON: And we can use it against him someday, too.
  • STANTON: Sometimes, the other thing is there's a line...
  • LASSETER: When he gets a girlfriend.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: There are lines that are cut out of Toy Story that we... You know, we miss, and one of them for me was Buzz calling Potato Head "Vegetable Man."
  • LASSETER: Ohh.
  • STANTON: And here was a chance to get the line in, in this movie. Was "Quick. Help me prop up Vegetable Man or we're done for." It's my son's favorite line, too.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • Buzz #2: Quick! Help me prop up Vegetable Man or we're done for.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Hey! Hey!
  • LASSETER: I love the fact that he has names. "Lizard Man," "Vegetable Man," "Slotted Pig" and "Springy Dog."
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, that's right. That was in the first movie when he met all the toys on the bed.
  • STANTON: "Greetings, Vegetable Man." was the one that had to go.
  • Buzz #2: Come on. We've got no time to lose. Everyone, grab hold!
  • UNKRICH: More really brilliant deluded Buzz animation.
  • LASSETER: I remember Angus acting that shot out where he's taking the magnets out of his, his utility belt.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. They actually shot that on video and then brought into the computer so that the animators could just model...
  • BRANNON: I think they animated that.
  • UNKRICH: ...model the animation after Angus' nutty acting.
  • LASSETER: So funny.
  • Rex: Hey, Buzz! Stop!
  • STANTON (LAUGHING): Rex. Hearing Rex way...
  • LASSETER: Rex way up there. And you could tell. It's just, like, two words.
  • Al: ...how much? What? That's in...
  • LASSETER: The character of Al, you know at times seems so realistic. But look at him. His... His legs are what? Like six inches long.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. I want to know... I want to know how this... I want to know how this guy drives a car.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHING)
  • STANTON: It's all about caricature.
  • LASSETER: I know.
  • STANTON: I mean, you want to make people feel like they're seeing something real but you have to really cheat to do it.
  • Jessie: Whoo-hoo!
  • LASSETER: I'm always amazed by this foam. It really feels like it's, it's... The, the, the, the work that Brad West and the shader team did is just to a whole other level. The shaders... Every surface is modeled. You have to have the color, the texture, you know, whether it's an image or painting or whatever, that's called the shaders. And, you know, the level of quality of shaders in this film, this is part of what brings Toy Story 2 to a whole other level. It's, it's astounding.
  • Hamm: Uh-oh. Hey, heads up...
  • LASSETER: This scene is almost verbatim from a scene that Bob Peterson storyboarded. I remember seeing it for the first time and it was just howling with laughter. And... Because of the way that he, like we said before, drew the deluded Buzz, and, you know, it's interesting because we came up with this scene first. And when we developed the opening, the Buzz Lightyear adventure, we, we wanted to put it sort of this, this anti-gravity servos, whatever that would be.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And that would be like... That's when we came up with the idea with the big blue bubble around that, that made him float.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. He originally didn't even say "To infinity and beyond." at the beginning. And then we realized, op, this is... Yet another thing from this scene that should be in the opening of the movie.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: Yes. In fact, even a lot of the staging is just exactly the same. So the parallels from the, the opening adventure to this, this all this effort that deluded Buzz is going through, the bowels of Zurg's fortress, you know, we matched the two so that there was actually a parallel so that you, you as an audience member would know what was going through deluded Buzz's head and would kind of buy it, you know?
  • STANTON: Cape Fear.
  • UNKRICH: Cape Fear.
  • Woody: How about giving me a little intro...
  • LASSETER: This little sequence here between Jessie, and Bullseye and, and, and Woody has got, I think, some of the best animation I think I've ever seen. This scene, in particular, right here. Doug Sweetland at his finest.
  • STANTON: I was like, "Did you make a deal with the devil?" Because this is just amazing. It's like alive, he's alive.
  • LASSETER: And I think more so than, than, than any scene in recent years... To have animation entertain an audience to that level, just the pure animation, is just astounding to me.
  • Woody: The blind's on fire! I've got you, critters.
  • LASSETER: There's a scene where Woody calls for his trusty steed Bullseye. Bullseye runs up under his partner there, and as he does a "Hi-Yo, Silver" kind of pose and slips off, originally this was a test animated by Angus MacLane. And it was so funny to us, the, the, the way that Bullseye, as the, the saddle would come off it'd be he'd feel like he was naked and slip away. Then when John Kahrs was animating the real shot, you know, he pulled that test animation and, and massaged it, as we say, adjusted it and, and made it work for the real scene. And it just is fantastic.
  • BRANNON: We had that scene animated for a long time and didn't even have a place for it. So we looked in desperation for the right moment.
  • LASSETER: 'Cause we just loved it. It was just... It said so much about Bullseye's character and was so funny.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Buzz, can you see what's going on?
  • STANTON: Another Potato Head gag.
  • LASSETER: Oh, this is so great. But this is, you know... I love taking it to another level, the fact that it's like a remote camera.
  • STANTON (LAUGHS): Right.
  • LASSETER: I just love that. That actually... That came... Another thing that came from the original Toy Story. Remember Joss Whedon, our original screenwriter, had this idea, to where he was gonna have Potato Head take his eye off, drop it on the floor, and kick it under Bo Peep's skirt.
  • STANTON: Yeah. She was gonna smack him with her.
  • LASSETER: And then she was gonna smack him with her cane. And we realized he can't quite do that, but we loved the idea of that remote camera kind of quality.
  • STANTON: This is one of my favorite gags.
  • Mr. Potato Head: ...Angry Eyes!
  • BRANNON: This is Pete Nash animating.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • Woody: ...don't understand. These are my friends!
  • Rex: Yeah, we're his friends!
  • LASSETER: The structure of this whole sequence was that of, like, we imagined this SWAT team coming in, you know, grabbing a hostage and taking him out really quick, like, boom, boom, boom, you know? And the energy was so fantastic in it. And then of course.
  • Toys: Buzz?
  • LASSETER: Which Buzz is, is the right one?
  • UNKRICH: And I love that we staged this just like those old cheesy movies where you'd have the identical twin meeting himself.
  • BRANNON: Can't cross the mirror.
  • STANTON: Our... Our homage to Freaky Friday.
  • UNKRICH: It's just purely in profile. No trickery. It's just one guy on one side of the screen, and the other guy on the other.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: It's like we had to do split screen.
  • BRANNON: Split screen.
  • LASSETER: We copied...
  • BRANNON: We farmed it out to ILM.
  • LASSETER: We contemplated having like a seam down the middle to make it look like we did a split screen.
  • Slinky Dog: I had a feeling it was you, Buzz. My front here just had to...
  • LASSETER: I love the way that Buzz shows who's the real Buzz by just opening his helmet, and we actually copied that animation almost verbatim for the way that Doug Sweetland originally animated it...
  • UNKRICH: In the first Toy Story.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, and Gary Rydstrom copied the same sound effects as well.
  • STANTON: Code 546 is the prefix of my hometown phone number.
  • BRANNON: You know, everybody's gonna start dialing 0000,0001.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • BRANNON: "Is this the Stanton residence?"
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • (UNKRICH LAUGHS)
  • BRANNON: 002.
  • Woody: I'm a rare Sheriff Woody doll, and these guys are my Roundup gang.
  • Buzz: Woody, what are you talking about?
  • Woody: What am I talking about? Woody's Roundup!
  • LASSETER: When we came up with the original idea of Toy Story 2, that Woody, that Woody gets stolen by a toy collector and gets caught up with the notion of being a collectible, and, and Buzz would go and rescue him, we, we thought we finally... It would be great to get him into a situation where, where Woody is caught up in, in his own world and Buzz gets to say to Woody this time, "You are a toy!" Exactly the opposite of, of Toy Story 1. And, you know, we, we, we always had it to where he mimicked, Tim Allen actually mimicked the way that Tom Hanks read the line.
  • Buzz: You are a toy!
  • LASSETER: And it was always, like, too harsh.
  • STANTON: Trying to force it in, like you're trying to shoehorn the wrong reading.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • UNKRICH: But...
  • LASSETER: And it was always...
  • BRANNON: It wasn't right for the moment.
  • UNKRICH: Trying to...
  • LASSETER: Too harsh. And in fact, if you really look at the, the, the structure of that line, it's reverse because originally it says... Tom Hanks says, "You are a toy." "You're not a..." You know, "You're not a spaceman. You are a..."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: "...action figure."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: "You're a child's plaything." And in, in this one we reverse it to where he says, "You are a toy," at the end of the line.
  • UNKRICH: This is the last. The capper.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • BRANNON: Just another parallel, like the arms, both get ripped off. There's so many examples of where Woody and Buzz have switched places in this movie.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. And Buzz is the one that's re-teaching Woody the notion, and the importance and nobility of being a toy.
  • BRANNON: Everything that Woody taught him.
  • STANTON: Yeah. That's what I find so poignant. Is that it's everything Woody taught him.
  • Woody: I don't have a choice, Buzz.
  • LASSETER: What, what I find so great about the way that this finally, you know, was structured is that The Prospector did such a good job in, in kind of brainwashing Woody, and he's only telling him one half of the story, that "You come to this museum, you'll be loved by, by children for generations. You'll be loved, you'll be loved, you'll be loved." And Buzz is the one that sorta tells him the dark side of it. Says "Yes, but you'll be behind glass. You'll never be touched. You'll never be loved again." And it's...
  • STANTON: It's the dilemma of do you want to live life and have it short or do you want to live forever and not really enjoy it?
  • LASSETER: Right. It's, yeah. It's immortality or to be loved, you know.
  • Woody (singing): We stick together and see it through...
  • UNKRICH: The thing I love about this is when, when Tom Hanks first came in on the first Toy Story meeting and we had our first meeting with him to play Woody, one of the first things he said was, "You're not gonna make me sing, are you?"
  • STANTON: That's the very first thing he ever said to us. (LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: "I... I can't sing. You're not gonna make me sing." And so we kind of made him sing.
  • Woody (singing): The way I do. It's me and you, boy.
  • LASSETER: Again, the "Andy" on Woody's boot and how poignant that is.
  • STANTON: Makes my job so much easier.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. It's just... It's such a nice thing to show visually that it's, like, he scrapes it off and realizes, you know, the meaning of, of, of being a toy.
  • Woody: You're right, Prospector. I can't stop Andy from growing up. But I wouldn't miss it for the world.
  • LASSETER: I love that line. I love that line, it means so much about being a parent as well, you know. I know we can't stop our kids from growing up, but we wouldn't miss it for the world.
  • Woody: Hey, you guys... Come with me.
  • Jessie: What?!
  • Woody: Andy will play with all of us.
  • LASSETER: This is such great animation here on Jessie. Look at, look at how, how, troubled of, of this decision is. She's just, like, so mixed up.
  • STANTON: And then this...
  • LASSETER: The subtlety in the animation of the eyes.
  • STANTON: And this is one of those moments that I have to only enjoy vicariously because I always know The Prospector is the bad guy and I, you get to hear the audience gasp when they see that empty box. And you always go, "That's right."
  • LASSETER: I...
  • STANTON: "They don't know that."
  • LASSETER: I am so proud of that moment because, you know, we, we, we, we thought, "Oh, people aren't gonna... People will get it. People will, will, will predict it." But they don't. And they, and they get so surprised and it's really fun. It's so fun to be an audience member and all of a sudden it's like, (GASPS) "What do you mean?"
  • UNKRICH: Well, any time...
  • LASSETER: "Darth Vader is Luke's dad."
  • UNKRICH: Or, or even beyond that. Any time you set up a character as someone to be trusted, you trust this person, and then you realize you...
  • BRANNON: Betrays you.
  • UNKRICH: ...never should have trusted this person ever. That...
  • LASSETER: This moment right here. The acting Kelsey Grammer does, the animation Glenn McQueen did, and, and the music Randy did. This is one of the best moments in the whole score. He just took that to another level. I'm so proud of that because you get it. You finally... You realize, "Wait a minute, he's a bad guy." And then you think about it from his point of view. He was never bought.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And the bitterness.
  • BRANNON: He was stuck on a shelf in a box, the kids didn't want him.
  • LASSETER: The deep bitterness that he has. And it's like, you know, "I finally am somebody and you're not gonna take it away from me."
  • Rex: ...I use my head?
  • (Woody grunts)
  • Woody: It's Al!
  • (Jessie gasps)
  • Al: Look at the time. I'm gonna be late! Figures. I can't miss this flight!
  • LASSETER: In using the ventilation, air conditioning grate, as, like, a jail cell, you know, Gary Rydstrom followed it up with the sound and all, and that he's trapped in this, in this cell, it was, it was really... It really worked well in, in that moment right there when, when his friends are on the other side and he can't get out.
  • STANTON: And now we come to one of our favorite moments.
  • LASSETER: Yes.
  • STANTON: The final confrontation.
  • Zurg: So, we meet again, Buzz Lightyear.
  • BRANNON: You know, we set up Zurg following Buzz and then you forgot about him just long enough...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • BRANNON: And then he...
  • UNKRICH: That's right. Right when things can't possibly get any worse.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • UNKRICH: Zurg shows up.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. And, and he looked phenomenal in that shot.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: You know. Sharon and her, her lighting team did such an amazing job, and we, and we studied The Empire Strikes Back and that brilliant lighting in that confrontation between Darth and Luke, and, and that orange and blues and stuff, and, and it was so fun because we just wanted the parallels and, and the homage and how fun all this is.
  • STANTON: There was just no other choice on how to bring this confrontation to an end. I mean, there was just... It was always, to us, the, the obvious solution.
  • BRANNON: I'm kind of proud of the fact that the villain wears a skirt too.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • BRANNON: I wanted an, an easy way to animate him, on little rollers, and it turned out to be perfect...
  • LASSETER: Little squeaky rollers.
  • BRANNON: ...with Gary adding the squeaks.
  • LASSETER: So great.
  • UNKRICH: Little side note, we actually have the voice of Zurg sitting here with us in the studio.
  • LASSETER: Yes.
  • STANTON: Thank you very much.
  • LASSETER: Andrew Stanton is the voice of Zurg because it was so heavily futzed.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: And we needed just good acting.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: Here it is.
  • Zurg: No, Buzz. I AM your father.
  • STANTON: I had to read that line so many times to get it right.
  • LASSETER: Yes.
  • STANTON: They actually called me in on a second session to read it again.
  • Al: Come on, come on.
  • LASSETER: I love that.
  • (Rex screams)
  • LASSETER: Zurg's gun that he lifts up. it goes up to 11. Okay, that's our little homage to Spinal Tap. See?
  • UNKRICH: 11.
  • LASSETER: There's the 11 right there. The whole sequence was actually quite difficult to do because we, we had it on top of this moving platform elevator. And I think they go up and down how many times?
  • UNKRICH: Oh, God. They must be in, like, a 400-story building.
  • LASSETER: Story building.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • (Muzak playing)
  • STANTON: The Muzak...
  • LASSETER: Okay. Yeah, the Muzak. The Muzak in the elevator is actually a part of the score from A Bug's Life done...
  • BRANNON: The 101 strange.
  • LASSETER: ...like a Muzak. Yeah.
  • UNKRICH: Bruno Coon was our...
  • STANTON: This is our...
  • UNKRICH: ...did some...
  • LASSETER: Here it is, here it is.
  • STANTON: Oddjob.
  • LASSETER: Oddjob. James Bond. Go...
  • BRANNON: The guy who animated it didn't even know who Oddjob was.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: That's right. That's right.
  • BRANNON: What's an oddjob?
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: That's right. Just like in the first movie, when the Pizza Planet truck comes out of nowhere just when we need it more than anything else, we do it a second time. Now, I'm very proud of this little Field of Dreams moment with, with Zurg. Look at this, one tooth is out.
  • STANTON: I know.
  • LASSETER: The light bulb. I love that.
  • STANTON: The Letterman Zurg.
  • LASSETER: It's, it's, it's just... It's really hilarious as a, as a topper on the whole thing. Originally we had, you know, Buzz carrying like the lifeless body of, of the Zurg toy off.
  • UNKRICH: Saying "I have to go bury my father."
  • LASSETER: "My father." And it was just a little too morbid, so we thought of Field of Dreams.
  • Buzz: Oh, no.
  • Rex: He's at a red light!
  • LASSETER: One of the favorite characters in Toy Story is the little three-eyed alien. And we originally had one or two of them in the, in Andy's room, just in the background. Andrew, you went to Japan on a publicity tour for A Bug's Life and you came back...
  • STANTON: Yeah. And I said, "The alien is everywhere. Everybody likes the alien."
  • LASSETER: It was huge in Japan.
  • STANTON: It has to be in the movie.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. It has to have a bigger part in the movie. And we thought, "What could we do? What could we do?" And we thought, you know, we had two ideas. One was when they're at the airport in the baggage area they would find just like a crate going to Pizza Planet...
  • BRANNON: Or somewhere.
  • LASSETER: ...a shipment of like thousands of aliens. And we thought, well, that might be a little difficult to do. And then we thought well... Well, maybe the Pizza Planet driver, like, you know, he works at Pizza Planet.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, or purpose like...
  • LASSETER: So he would get a few of them and they'd be dangling from the rearview mirror. The airport scene, especially this opening shot, we're expectionally proud of because of the incredible amount of detail. There's no way we could have done this four years ago. No way when we made the original Toy Story. The amount of detail that's in this. Galyn Susman and her incredible team, the technical team, you know, through the modeling and, and the ability... I mean, we took a lot of the knowledge that we developed on A Bug's Life in doing all of the ant colony and applied it here. I am still amazed at all the detail.
  • UNKRICH: This, this shot is just so cool.
  • BRANNON: I love the kids playing patty-cake.
  • LASSETER: Watch this. Watch this. Watch, watch, watch. Boom! He slugs her and, and hides. You know?
  • STANTON: Ooh, bam.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • Al: Listen, flyboy.
  • STANTON: That's my kidnapped Molly.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • STANTON: It's like, "That's Molly."
  • Al: ...sport?
  • Airport employee: I understand, sir.
  • Al: You be careful! Do you have a "fragile" sticker or something?
  • BRANNON: We were real lucky to know somebody who had a connection at San Francisco International Airport and we got an actual tour of the baggage claim... Actually, besides... Behind the scenes, where we're going right here.
  • UNKRICH: Wahh!
  • LASSETER: This took 70 hours a frame to render.
  • STANTON: Soon to be a new ride at Disneyland, I hope.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • (UNKRICH LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Wouldn't that be awesome? By the way, the ceiling of this baggage area is the ceiling of Al's Toy Barn.
  • BRANNON: And Buzz has a sticker on his rear end. It's from Butte, Montana.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. It's... I'm sorry, that's just a joke that I loved.
  • STANTON: We got...
  • BRANNON: Sorry. Butte Chamber of Commerce.
  • UNKRICH: Sorry to all our friends in Butte. (LAUGHS)
  • BRANNON: If we have any left.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • Slinky Dog: Woah!
  • UNKRICH: Not only was this, this whole sequence really difficult to render, it was really, really difficult to, to do the layout and the, and the staging. Ewan Johnson and Rikki Cleland led an amazing layout team. And... This was really bar none the most difficult sequence in the entire movie to layout. It was just so visually complicated. It was like doing a giant three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle, putting this whole thing together. And...
  • LASSETER: They'd...
  • UNKRICH: ...it just looks amazing.
  • LASSETER: They would work on the, the main track where the action was going first. Where we'd get all that, that working. Then the set dressing would come in afterwards, once we figured where the main action would go, and put the conveyor belts that you see off to the left and right, and, and just put it in there shot by shot.
  • UNKRICH: Well, the amazing thing is we can do all the hero animation, all the foreground stuff, and we had that done. And then later on we started to see stuff rendered with the bags in the background. And it just added such a rich complexity to the whole thing. And it really just makes this, this sequence look so dazzling.
  • LASSETER: This was done... This was done so late in the production that we just... Thank goodness, it was, it was looking good the first time through.
  • Stinky Pete: Spending eternity rotting in some landfill!
  • Woody: Well, Stinky Pete...
  • STANTON: We actually deliberated for a long time what the proper comeuppance for The Prospector was.
  • LASSETER: Oh, yeah. We, we reworked this comeuppance numerous times.
  • Stinky Pete (whimpering): No!
  • Woman over PA: Atlantic Air fight 810 from Point Richmond...
  • LASSETER: There it is, Lasset Air, Flight A113.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: A113 was our animation room at CalArts.
  • Amy: ...makeover.
  • (Stinky Pete whimpers)
  • LASSETER: When we originally were, were designing the, the drawing that was gonna be on the side of Barbie's face, we had like, you know, makeup, like badly drawn makeup. When we were talking to the folks at Mattel they were the ones that suggested, "Why don't you do it more like, you know, face paint?" And we thought, "That's even better," because the line is that she's an artist...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...and it turned out to be really funny.
  • Jessie: Ohh! No!
  • LASSETER: The beginning of this rescue, when of Woody going out to save Jessie, we were so excited with the idea of actually Woody being a real cowboy and he's comfortable with it. So he gets on Bullseye. And even though these are toys running across a tarmac at an airport, we studied lots of Western movies and, and really staged this in...
  • UNKRICH: We just wanted this to be like a classic Western.
  • LASSETER: A classic Western.
  • UNKRICH: Down to the tiniest detail.
  • LASSETER: And even, even with Randy Newman's music at this point. We said, "Randy, this is a Western. Ignore what you're seeing, this is a Western." And we're so proud of this. This is great.
  • UNKRICH: And it's also so great that it's like another diametric opposite from the first Toy Story. Woody is so completely in charge here, and it's almost like Buzz is almost for the ride. Woody is just grabbed the reins literally and just gone for it, trying to get out there and rescue Jessie.
  • LASSETER: You know, and part of it is he knows what Jessie has been through, you know? And, and her emotion.
  • STANTON: Yeah. They're connected. They're soul mates about this. And... That's why this is the best capper for the climax is you've saved Woody, he knows where he needs to be, but the ultimate selfless way to deal with the whole subject matter is to save another toy who will not be played with from, from that fate and, and bring her back to a kid. So that just really rung true for us. Is that's the proper way to really end this climax, save Jessie.
  • BRANNON: And that means risking everything he needs and wants in order to do that.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • UNKRICH: They could have turned around and just gone home.
  • STANTON: It... It makes him more a hero.
  • UNKRICH: And they got Woody by now.
  • STANTON: He's finally gotten back, he's gonna get his Andy, but he's gonna risk himself all over again to make sure she gets it, too.
  • LASSETER: And he doesn't even question it.
  • Woody: Excuse me, ma'am, but I believe you're on the wrong flight.
  • Jessie: Woody!
  • Woody: Come on, Jess. It's time to take you home.
  • Jessie: But...
  • LASSETER: Such great voice acting.
  • Woody: Nonsense! Andy will...
  • BRANNON: And it was serendipitous, you know, that Andy had the little sister Molly.
  • Jessie: Why didn't you say so?
  • BRANNON: Who...
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • BRANNON: Who could take Jessie and grow up with her and...
  • STANTON: These are the other moments, I love doing it again. Back to like doing what the audience is gonna expect, try and lead them into that they're gonna jump out of this thing.
  • UNKRICH: Everything's okay?
  • STANTON: Bam.
  • UNKRICH: Oop. No, it's not.
  • LASSETER: We...
  • STANTON: I always love this moment.
  • LASSETER: We always held to moment in Toy Story, the first one, when the match blew out.
  • STANTON: What are they gonna do?
  • LASSETER: What are they gonna do? And we said we gotta have that in this once again. And we came up with the idea that the door closes and the plane is gonna take off.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • (plane whirring)
  • UNKRICH: In our original conception at this, the... The first time we put it together, it was originally Jessie who slipped and fell and Woody caught her and saved her. And she was the one dangling, almost falling in front of the tire. And this is a good example of how Joan Cusack inspired us to make Jessie a stronger character. We talked to her about this during a recording session in Chicago and she actually made us come up with the idea of, "No, let's have Woody slip and Jessie saves the day." Jessie grabs Woody and saves him. And she doesn't have to be just a stereotypical damsel in distress dangling under the plane.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • BRANNON: Joan, Joan was not the type to just take the lines and read them. She had a strong opinion. She was no, not afraid at all to mention it.
  • LASSETER: She really... She really loved Jessie the character and was like, "Why is this so typical?" And we realized, yeah, it is typical. Why are we doing this? And so we, we switched it around right then and there at the recording session. And I remember being in Chicago and calling Andrew on the phone. And like, "Andrew, what if we swtich it?" And we quickly wrote lines over the phone and did it. And it was so exciting.
  • STANTON: And that's how all our movies get made. I mean, it's just everybody pitches in and, and good stuff inspires more good stuff and, and, and on and on and on. You just... You know you've done it right when at the end you're just like, "Thank God everybody that worked on this movie was working on this movie."
  • Woody: Oh-oh-oh.
  • LASSETER: One of the things that, that we strived for, that, you know, I don't know if we've ever really had truly, is, is an ending where the audience just wanted... You just, get up and cheer.
  • UNKRICH: Break out in a cheer.
  • LASSETER: And we were so excited. We really worked hard on this. And this idea of the second plane coming in was so fun because it's just that it comes out of left field and it just makes people squirm.
  • UNKRICH: It's just that you've got this big jubilant balloon of everyone so excited that they made it, then we just pop it.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • Andy: Yee-hah!
  • BRANNON: Do you remember how this used to start? We were with Andy and Mom. And they were coming home from camp, and they passed by the baggage truck from the airport.
  • STANTON: Yeah, they...
  • BRANNON: We were totally giving it away.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • UNKRICH: This was much, much funnier because they're vivid, they made it back to the room. And you're kinda thinking Well How did they possibly get back? And, oh, I guess they're just cheating and saying they made it back. But no, we explain.
  • Andy: Cool! Thanks, Mom!
  • LASSETER: And the having the parallel of the beginning of the nightmare sequence, too.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: The staging and the animation...
  • BRANNON: Shot by shot.
  • LASSETER: ...is almost, almost the same there. And I love this couple across the street.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: This guy's standing there with a coffee cup just like, the morning just like... Even as, even as it rack focused the guy takes a sip of coffee. I just love that.
  • Andy's Mom: ...Woody!
  • Andy: Yeah. Glad I decided not to take him to camp. His whole arm might have come off.
  • LASSETER: Now we, we at Pixar are big fans of epilogues that nicely tie up each of the little characters, you know, in nice, neat little bundles. Because... It's frankly the kind of movies we like to see. You like to see one last time with your favorite characters. And so we went through each of the characters. And I just love that, the business with Bullseye and, and with the "Andy" written on his foot. But every little moment, we really worked hard on. And, and even in the editing, we kinda shifted things around. Remember that? We had the single individual moments, but which order they were in, we, we worked on a little bit.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah, it's really easy for epilogues to kinda go on too long 'cause you're trying to wrap everybody up. And we found a great balance of giving everyone their moment and moving on.
  • LASSETER: The, the Hot Wheels car she's riding down right there is actually an extremely scaled-down version of Emily's car from the...
  • UNKRICH: From Jessie's song.
  • LASSETER: From Jessie's song, yes.
  • Hamm: Oh... Hey, Rex, I could use a hand over here, buddy.
  • Rex: I don't need to play. I...
  • BRANNON: Yeah. For the longest time we had no comeuppance for Al, and then somebody thought of, "Let's do the commercial again." Even though...
  • UNKRICH: It makes no sense.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • UNKRICH: He's off in Japan.
  • LASSETER: He's in Japan right now, and this is live TV.
  • UNKRICH: But nobody questions it. And if they do, so what? This is, this is such a satisfying ending.
  • STANTON: But you bought the disc by now.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • UNKRICH: Very futzed.
  • LASSETER: Oh, well.
  • Bo Peep: ...tough.
  • (Mr. Potato Head smooches)
  • (Mrs. Potato Head laughs)
  • Aliens: You have saved our lives.
  • LASSETER: I love this animation of the, this scene. And, and Estelle Harris does such a great job there. And the way she tweaks the antenna. Such great animation.
  • BRANNON: Pete Nash again.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Oh, no.
  • (Wheezy squeaking)
  • STANTON: We came up with the idea of having Wheezy sort of have the Jim Nabors dynamic where he has this cute little voice but he can suddenly sing with this big deep opera voice.
  • LASSETER: And, and Joe Ranft does the speaking voice and we got none other than, than Robert Goulet to do the singing voice. We had so much fun. Because I remember going to Randy Newman saying, "We want to do a version of You've got a Friend in Me, a reprise, but do it big band." And it was so fun at the recording session. You know, a...
  • BRANNON: Like a 40-piece brass band, amazing.
  • UNKRICH: Like all... All out, big splashy...
  • LASSETER: It was, it was fantastic. And I remember there was a line in the song where it says "son," and Robert Goulet made it "babe." And it just was so Vegas. It was great.
  • UNKRICH: "You got a friend in me, babe."
  • LASSETER: This scene here is, I think, some of the best writing you've done, Andrew.
  • STANTON: Thank you.
  • LASSETER: I love this scene. In fact, I remember when Andrew handed me the script page it actually kinda almost brought a tear to my eye. And I thought it was so great.
  • UNKRICH: And we didn't... We didn't change a word.
  • LASSETER: And it's just exactly...
  • STANTON: The only time.
  • BRANNON: Put a gold star on it.
  • LASSETER: Now, when we cut back, I wanted just to take it home, big time, and I remember saying, "We gotta have Barbie backup singers." And so many people were saying, "Well, why would he... Andy have Barbies in his room?" I said, "People aren't gonna care at this point." You know, not only Barbie backup singers, let's put them in sequins.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: Iris out on Wheezy.
  • LASSETER: Originally Toy Story 2 was planned as a direct to video, because back in 1995, that was kind of the way that sequels to animated features were made and, and were thought of. And so we started developing the story but we really felt that, that this belonged on the big screen. And so about a year into the production, we had a screening and showed it to the executives at Disney as well as all of us at Pixar, and we looked up there and said, "Yes! Thing belongs up on the big screen." So at that point, the decision was made to make this a theatrical sequel. But at Pixar, we alway felt that the only reason to do a sequel to Toy Story is if we could come up with a story that was as good as the first but was different. And we really worked hard in the emotion side of the story, 'cause, you know, the humor and the, the staging, the action, and, and the, the great visuals we, we knew would, would come, but it's that emotion that was so important to us because what we value is a story in which characters change, characters grow. And in Toy Story, we're very proud of the way that Woody and Buzz both grow. And you couldn't make them go back and have amnesia and, and grow in the same way again. They had to grow in a different way. And that was extremely challenging.
  • STANTON: It's, pretty overwhelming to have to do a sequel. Like I said before, we're audience members first and filmmakers second. And, we just know how few good sequels there are, and we knew that, that, that was the only thing we were going to accept. We're, we're only going to live with ourselves if we knew that we made something that was a worthy pairing with the first one and could stand on its own, but also complemented each other for watching them both. And, it's a real testament I think to Pixar and to Disney and to everybody that represents those names. We had some insurmountable goals. And it's just, I'm very proud of everybody that had anything to do with this.
  • (Wheezy singing)
  • LASSETER: In choosing to do a sequel, we also recognized that these characters mean a lot to people and we had to do it right. We had to do it, make it great. Right after Toy Story came out, my family took a vacation and we were changing planes in an airport. We got off the plane, and this is five days after the movie came out, and there was a little boy standing outside the, the, the gate waiting for... Clearly waiting for his dad and he was holding a Woody doll. And this is just after our movie came out. And at that moment, I realized that these characters don't belong to use anymore. We created them, that, but they don't belong to us anymore. They belong to the world.
  • (Barbies sing)
  • BRANNON: I just have to say I'm so glad that Toy Story 2 came along when it did because we were ready to make this film at the time we made it. The story we were telling had more depth than anything else we'd done. And the characters had to be extremely believable this time because they're dealing with issues of mortality and abandonment, that's a really some really deep subject matter that, you know, if you don't believe in these characters, the whole picture's gonna fall apart. But luckily, we had two movies under our belt and we'd all become better filmmakers at the studio. So everyone was prepared to face the challenges that the story offered. This is the first time I've seen a movie for a while and I'm still amazed at the fantastic job that everyone on this crew did. So please take a look at their names as they roll by here because they worked really hard and they went to incredible lengths to bring this movie to you. Not just the animators, but the story crew, lighting, modeling, everyone. It was just great how much experience they had before they came on.
  • LASSETER: And the actors.
  • BRANNON: Yeah. Even that.
  • UNKRICH: Well, the great thing about the actors is that this movie wouldn't be the movie that it is without those amazing performers, and we just thank our lucky stars that every last one of them wanted to come back and be a part of this movie. We've always been so generous in, in having these actors be an integral part of creating these characters alongside us. And we have to give Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, all of them, as much credit for these characters as ourselves as, as ourselves. And, I think the actors recognize that and when they heard we were doing a sequel and, and they heard the story and thought it was so great, I don't think any of them wanted to envision a Toy Story 2 that had somebody else's voice coming out of the character's mouth that they created.
  • (music playing)
  • LASSETER: So often when I'm questioned about this, everybody wants to know how the technology has grown since we made the original. Yes, it has grown a lot. But really, what makes this film great is the people who worked on it.
  • UNKRICH: Yeah. The work that you're seeing here is the work of people at the peak of their forms. We have some of the finest people, finest minds, finest creative minds in the industry working with us. We're extremely fortunate and blessed to be working with them.
  • LASSETER: And they love what they do. You know, that's what's great. And, and, and I think, also, the care in which all of us at Pixar made this movie shows how much we actually love these characters as well. We, we've always felt that Buzz and Woody are not creations we've created, but actual friends and colleagues of ours and family members.
  • (ALL TALK AT ONCE)
  • UNKRICH: We're responsible for them now. It's like we're not the creators so much as the caretakers of, of these guys. It's just our responsibility to, to make sure we tell good stories with them and, and are, are true to these characters.
  • LASSETER: Hey, Andrew, say something funny.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • STANTON: No monkeys were harmed at all during this picture.
  • UNKRICH: Well, just that one.
  • STANTON: I remembered at the end of the Bug's Life disc, we were like, "Well, it's one in the morning. We've gotta go and finish Toy Story 2."
  • UNKRICH: Well, we finished Toy Story 2.
  • STANTON: Now it's 4:30 in the afternoon and we gotta go finish Monsters, Incorporated.
  • (UNKRICH LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: Well, this is Andrew Stanton, writer on the movie, just signing off. And thank you for sticking with us through all this.
  • BRANNON: Andrew, I'm with you. I'm Ash Brannon, co-director, signing off.
  • UNKRICH: And this is Lee Unkrich, the other co-director of this motion picture, saying good night.
  • LASSETER: And this is John Lasseter, director, saying thank you for joining us and thank you for suffering through this long commentary. I hope you enjoyed it. Because we enjoyed doing it, and...
  • ALL: Don't talk to any toy you don't know!
  • Barbies (singing): Yes, you do.
  • Wheezy (singing): You've got a friend in... Me.
  • (long solo)
  • Wheezy: Yeah!

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