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Toy Story commentary with Director John Lasseter, Producers Ralph Guggenheim and Bonnie Arnold, Co-writer Andrew Stanton, Supervising animator Pete Docter, Art director Ralph Eggleston and Supervising technical director Bill Reeves.

Transcript

  • JOHN LASSETER: I'm John Lasseter. I co-wrote the original story and directed the film Toy Story.
  • RALPH GUGGENHEIM: I'm Ralph Guggenheim.
  • BONNIE ARNOLD: I'm Bonnie Arnold.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And Bonnie and I produced Toy Story.
  • ANDREW STANTON: And I'm Andrew Stanton. I'm one of the screenwriters and storyboard artists for the film.
  • PETE DOCTER: My name's Pete Docter. I worked on the story and was supervising animator.
  • RALPH EGGLESTON: My name's Ralph Eggleston. I was the art director on Toy Story.
  • BILL REEVES: And I'm Bill Reeves, supervising technical director on Toy Story.
  • LASSETER: And we're here to give you an audio commentary for the wonderful Toy Story.
  • Andy: Now empty that safe.
  • LASSETER: When we started this whole idea, it seemed to be very doable in the sense that, computer graphics tend to make things look kinda plastic-y anyway, so we might as well do a story about toys. And you and I, Bill, we did Tin Toy, that short film, which kind of introduced the whole notion about these toys being alive and stuff.
  • DOCTER: The first time we see Woody is a classic Western introduction.
  • LASSETER: We wanted to have it sort of a child's version of a Western movie, and as he starts playing, it gets into the sort of kid-like non-sequitur...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...sort of thing.
  • STANTON: Kid's logic. I mean, in a weird way, it's logical for the kid, but...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: ...that one was true...
  • DOCTER: He would have the playtime...
  • STANTON: Playtime.
  • DOCTER: ...the force field.
  • LASSETER: The force field, and then the...
  • GUGGENHEIM, DOCTER: The dinosaurs, and...
  • Andy: ...who eats force field dogs!
  • STANTON: Here's an interesting thing. So many people come up to us, and they didn't know that Molly was in the same room with Andy. It's like the crib's in there all the time.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: But people really, I guess we just didn't sell it enough, that, you know, Molly shares the room with. People would thought Bo Peep was Andy's toy.
  • Andy: You saved the day...
  • GUGGENHEIM: And here we have this, you know, amazing opening song by Randy Newman, who did the songs and the score.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • ARNOLD: Right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: I started remember the first time that we sat down and listened to Randy... Sing this song just on the piano.
  • ARNOLD: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And, uh, we talked about the emotions, we talked about some of the feelings we wanted in the song.
  • ARNOLD: The things we likened to were Harold and Maude.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yeah.
  • ARNOLD: And The Graduate, where songs actually told about an emotional moment in the film rather than the character singing about those things. It just made this seem more contemporary and realisitc, and I think that's what John was trying to go for.
  • STANTON: Right, right.
  • Andy: Hey, cowboy.
  • STANTON: In a short amount of time, we needed to show that Andy and Woody had this lifelong bond, but we don't have the whole movie. We wanna disrupt that as soon as we can, and it was great. From the minute when he heard Randy's song, we knew this did it, this made you feel like these guys were inseparable,
  • GUGGENHEIM: I think it did even more than that. It really defined so much of the theme of the whole movie for us.
  • LASSETER: And we used this, this song at the end, during the end credits. In the beginning, it's about Andy's relationship with Woody,...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...and at the end, it's Woody's relationship with Buzz.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Mmm.
  • LASSETER: When Ralph and, and your crew... You designed all these sets. I mean, really, this world is a really three-dimensional world. It's something different than cell animation. I mean, these are truly dimensional sets.
  • EGGLESTON: And the living room is the first thing I think we really got into, and ahh, there's so much detail you never really get a close look at.
  • Andy's Mom: Yeah, I think that's gonna be enough.
  • LASSETER: I remember you said that you wanted to give a sense of history to this world so that when people looked at, it looks like people have lived in these houses. Bill, you would get the... All these designs. They were more or less like blueprints, you know.
  • REEVES: Yeah. You'd get this packet of information of what they call it, which was a specification of what they... What these things, objects really look like. It was as if we had to build them out of wood...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • REEVES: ...or clay, or plastic, or whatever.
  • Andy: Come on, Molly. You're getting heavy. See ya later, Woody.
  • STANTON: And now Woody comes to life for the first time.
  • DOCTER: Slow track in.
  • STANTON: "Directed by John Lasseter."
  • LASSETER: Yeah, my credit's the longest one on the movie.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: It's one frame longer than yours.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: There's the first line that Woody should say, we went through so many revisions.
  • LASSETER: So many.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yeah.
  • DOCTER: We have pages and pages of Woody's first line.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Just about as many pages as we have titles.
  • STANTON: There's a lot of pessure on your main character. What's the first thing he says?
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: He should be, have an edge, but not too edgy, 'cause you know, it's for kids too.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Ages 3 and up, it's on my box. Ages 3 and up, I'm not supposed to be babysitting...
  • LASSETER: In casting the toys, we really looked at sort of, what kind of personality we wanted them to have, and a lot of it was drawn out of the type of toy it was. Mr. Potato Head's a classic example, 'cause one of the characteristics of the toy is that it's constantly losing its parts, and we thought it would have a chip on its shoulder. Don Rickles was the first, first actor that we thought for this.
  • STANTON: The only choice.
  • LASSETER: The only choice. Yeah, he was great.
  • Woody: Uh, Sarge, have you seen Slinky?
  • LASSETER: The definitive army man is the drill sergeant in Full Metal Jacket, and so we casted him.
  • STANTON: Now Slinky is the last character to finally be cast. We actually...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: ...we actually remodeled him because of Jim Varney's voice.
  • LASSETER: That's right.
  • Slinky Dog: Bad news?!
  • ARNOLD: Well, I think Jim brought the hound dog sort of quality to it, but he was a person, and had that sort of kind of voice that just sort of more, I guess cartoon-y, for lack of a better word, without sort of putting on a voice.
  • LASSETER: Well, one of the things about Etch A Sketch is, in bringing these toys to life, we thought... Everybody draws on an Etch A Sketch so badly...
  • STANTON (LAUGHS): Yeah.
  • LASSETER: ...we wanted to have Etch A Sketch, if he was alive, be able to do crosshatching and absolutely...
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: ...exquisite circles.
  • STANTON: Well, he would naturally be the best at it.
  • Slinky Dog: Come on, let's go.
  • STANTON: Jurassic Park had just come out when we were designing Rex, and we decided would it be great to have a slant on T. rex and have him be insecure.
  • LASSETER: Well, first of all, it's sorta, like, any dinosaur, the coolest dinosaur there is, is a T. rex.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: So we had to have T. rex...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...and then we played him against type...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...and make him neurotic.
  • GUGGENHEIM: The most neurotic carnivore ever to walk the earth.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: Having these vestigial arms, not being able to touch their own nose.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, they are pathetic. I mean. they're like the most pathetic things on there... I mean, he's the most fearsome creature to walk the Earth, but he can't even scratch his own nose.
  • 'Woody: Uh, nothing.
  • LASSETER: You know, in designed the characters, we really studied real toys. Remember that? We would go to Toys R Us all the time?
  • EGGLESTON: Ohh.
  • LASSETER: I think I was in heaven.
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Remember when we went to Toys R Us and bought toys with the company credit card during work hours?
  • EGGLESTON: Collected toys and...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • EGGLESTON: ...of course, everybody had their own they would bring in.
  • LASSETER: Right. This kind of brings up the point that we wanted to in the... To mix toys that we made up along with existing toys that were out there. And we kept giving Ralph a list of... "Hey, Ralph, let's get Little Tikes."
  • STANTON: Uh.
  • LASSETER: "Hey, Ralph. let's get Tinkertoys." And...
  • GUGGENHEIM: The hours I spent on the phone with Mr. Potato Head's lawyer...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: It's true.
  • GUGGENHEIM: ...trying to work out the use of Mr. Potato Head in our movie.
  • LASSETER: It's true. "We gotta have him."
  • STANTON: But it's funny. We only picked existing toys that have withstood the test of time...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: ...that have gone through one or two generations and that hopefully would still be around even if this movie's watched 10, 20 years from now.
  • LASSETER: Right. In fact, a Slinky Dog was the only toy that we used that didn't... Wasn't currently in production.
  • Woody: I don't want any toys left behind. A moving buddy. If you don't have one...
  • DOCTER: The books behind Woody are the old Pixar films.
  • STANTON: I'm sure that's like we're the most pauses are going to happen on this to read...
  • LASSETER, DOCTER: Reading the binding.
  • STANTON: ...the bindings on the books.
  • LASSETER: Well, the other thing to look at is in a lot of scenes we have funny little sayings across Mr. Spell's... readout. That's his dialogue.
  • DOCTER: "The staff meeting."
  • LASSETER: Well, we thought, in analyzing toys and the purpose of toys, they are manufactured to be played with by a child. And they have... But they could look at being played with by a child as their job. And so, if they all look at this as a job, this is their workplace when Andy leaves the room.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: So naturally, at every workplace you have staff meetings.
  • GUGGENHEIM: This is the scene that we probably storyboarded and re-storyboarded and wrote more often than any other movie.
  • ARNOLD: A zillion times.
  • STANTON: Kissing his butt right there was the definitive joke for the movie.
  • LASSETER: Right. It's funny to watch audience's faces when they see that. It's all of a sudden, "Did I see what I just saw?"
  • STANTON: Right.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: "This is a Disney movie and he's..."
  • STANTON: And it kinda set the tone for the rest of the movie. It said...
  • LASSETER: There, there's...
  • STANTON: "We're reverent. Get ready for irreverence."
  • LASSTER: Yeah.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: And because there was a real attention to, to the, the adult audience and the teenage audience in Toy Story. We wanted to make this for kids, but also make it so the adults would enjoy it as well.
  • Hamm: I hate to break up the staff meeting...
  • LASSETER: One of the animators, Doug Sweetland, worked on these scenes that where Woody gets run over by all the toys, and he worked on them for such a long period of time that he actually had, when he finished that one scene, he had a wrap party.
  • STANTON: His own wrap party.
  • LASSETER: He had his own party for the one scene.
  • GUGGENHEIM: For the one shot of the movie.
  • DOCTER: It was good chocolate cake that he made for himself.
  • (STANTON AND GUGGENHEIM LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: Hamm the piggy bank we thought of as being a Mr. Know-It-All, 'cause he sits up on the shelf and he stares out the window all day. He knows more than the rest of the toys. So we cast John Ratzenberger, who played Cliff the mailman from Cheers. And this guy came in, and he was so amazing at ad-libs. 'Cause really the character of Hamm was just one-liners all the time.
  • Rex: Yes, yes! We promise!
  • LASSETER: So for every line he had, he gave us 10 hilarious alternatives, and he just kept ad-libbing. In fact, we found we just ran the tape and let him come up with all this...
  • STANTON: Keep going.
  • LASSETER: Keep going.
  • Woody: You know what to do.
  • Sarge: Yes, sir.
  • STANTON: And now comes probably everybody's favorite sequence.
  • ARNOLD: Well, this is of course the very first sequence that we... Basically that we boarded and that we animated.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right. It got shown around quite a bit, and it also really epitomized the essence of the story. When these soldiers start walking, you know a lot about the world of toys that's going to be created in this movie.
  • ARNOLD: And I think there's not one guy out there that does not relate to those little green army men. I haven't met one yet.
  • LASSETER: In analyzing the green army men, we realized there were three basic things that we had to have in the model. One, they're badly molded, so they had all that extra plastic, the mold flashing that was sticking out of their heads. Their gun barrels are always bent, and their feet are always attached to those bases. And when the paratroopers go off, 'cause I love those... And they had to have them hooked with a big ring on their head. I love that.
  • GUGGENHEIM: But you know, we were always... I remember the first few times we showed it to audiences, we were always surprised because we always thought the paratroopers on the edge of the balcony was sort of a big, dramatic moment in the scene. And, instead, it always gets a huge laugh.
  • STANTON: Huge laugh.
  • LASSETER: A huge laugh, yeah.
  • Woody: ...find out what is in those presents.
  • LASSETER: We had to have them freeze in their classic army man poses. It was a must.
  • Andy's Mom: Here come the chips. I've got cool ranch...
  • LASSETER: You know, green army men. When their feet are attached to their bases, that's how they walk. And so we thought of when she actually steps on one of the guys, his base breaks off, and that's why he can't walk. But it's one of those definitive scenes that you have in all army pictures, is the injured soldier saying, "Go on. Go on without me."
  • STANTON: That's right. You had to put that in.
  • LASSETER: You had to put that in. And the Sarge... I mean, one of the themes of this is teamwork, is working together. And so it kinda reinforced the theme of the whole movie for him to say... "No, you never..."
  • STANTON: "A good soldier never leaves a man behind."
  • LASSETER: Yeah. "A good soldier never leaves a man behind."
  • GUGGENHEIM: Right out of the Sergeant Rock and all those movies.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. Pete, tell them about the way...
  • DOCTER: I took some old tennis shoes and nailed them to a big board, and we tried running around to get the animation quality of, "How would you actually move with this board strapped to your feet?" And it's actually really hard.
  • Andy's Mom: Everybody, come on. Settle down...
  • LASSETER: Oh, this is an interesting trivia thing. No one's really noticed that we have the wrong end of the baby monitor down there.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • STANTON: For those parents there, they probably caught it.
  • LASSTER: They probably know. That's the end you listen to.
  • STANTON: Not the end you talk into.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, yeah.
  • DOCTER: Ahh...
  • LASSETER: In fact, in the original script, we had two-way conversations between them.
  • DOCTER: Uh.
  • LASSETER: "Come in, Mother Bird. Yeah, we're right here."
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: We were like, wait a minute...
  • DOCTER: It's a one-way radio.
  • LASSETER: ...it's a one-way radio.
  • (DOCTER LAUGHS)
  • Mr. Potato Head: Mrs. Potato Head, Mrs. Potato Head. Hey, I can dream, can't I?
  • LASSETER: But even the staging of this whole Army Man scene was done very much in the flavor of, like, you know, combat in the classic, you know, army films.
  • Baby monitor: ...second present, it appears to be, okay, it's bed sheets.
  • Mr. Potato Head: Who invited that kid?
  • DOCTER: More movie magic. How can he actually see through plastic green binoculars?
  • (STANTON AND GUGGENHEIM LAUGH)
  • Andy's Mom: Ohh, only one left.
  • ARNOLD: At this point, you're really engrossed in the story that's going on, even though you haven't met Buzz Lightyear yet. In my mind, the Army Man sequence is really when it sort of... It just, just, you're just caught up in it at that moment.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. The Sarge there did silent hand signals, and we actually got a list from, I think it was the Marines or the Army of silent, actaul silent hand signals that they use.
  • Andy's Mom: Wait a minute...
  • STANTON: It's funny, technically it's the, or from a story point, it's the one sequence of the movie where we're really not advancing the story as fast as we were with the rest of the movie, but you wanna...
  • LASSETER: Oh, it's so fun.
  • STANTON: ...watch this moment so much... It's like, who cares?
  • Sarge: He's so excited about this. It's a huge package.
  • STANTON: Now you're... Notice, if you caught that, Potato Head is Catholic.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Well, it's an Irish puh... It's an Irish Catholic. Irish Catholic.
  • STANTON: It makes sense.
  • Rex: It's a what?
  • LASSETER: I really love the fact that the toys are so knowledgeable about the batteries. It just... It just shows the intelligence of the toys and the knowlegde that they have of this world.
  • STANTON: It's like looking at your own kids. They have different priorities in their life and that, that are very serious and important to them, and for them, something like this batteries falling, you know, coming out or dealing with them is a big deal.
  • LASSETER: Mmm-hmm. The other thing is this sets up beautifully that these characters know they're toys. They know they are plastic, they know they run on batteries, and they're fully aware of their world, so it sets it up nicely when Buzz comes into the room and he's fully unaware...
  • STANTON: Right, that's...
  • LASSETER: ...that's he a toy. 
  • STANTON: ...we purposely did that so that there would be that contrast.
  • LASSETER: Right. As the kids come into the room here, we really wanted to have the feeling and staging and animation and everything or a whirlwind.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: Of just... And even through Gary Rydstrom, our sound designer, we had him just make it loud and noisy and just an explosion.
  • STANTON: That's impact when the door opens, it's like hits people's chest in the theaters.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Really, right.
  • LASSETER: Then he purposely took all the sound out right here, so it's almost completely silent. And it reinforced the feeling of that whirlwind.
  • GUGGENHEIM: The vacuum that occurs after the...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: ...whirlwind's gone.
  • STANTON: The aftermath.
  • Slinky Dog: What is it?
  • LASSETER: Early on in the development of the story, we had this, this image, this idea of setting up the world, and this character is... You know, it is the top toy, is Andy's favorite toy, and the way visually to show that is he has the spot on the bed. And by setting up that spot on the bed, and none of the other toys are on the bed, you know, it's so clear when he's knocked off and something else is put up there, it says it right away and that's what I think that...
  • STANTON: And people catch that, I think.
  • Woody: ...big, Andy's room welcome.
  • STANTON: And now...
  • GUGGENHEIM: The moment of discovery.
  • EGGLESTON: Buzz is the only white, fully white character of all of the characters here. Everything else has got lots of color. And, I think in some of the early ones Buzz was red. And that was really cute for the tests, it works fine. But we needed something that really set him apart. He's brand-new...
  • STANTON: Oh, wait a minute, here comes the Darth Vader POV.
  • LASSETER: Oh, that's right.
  • STANTON: We had to have that. What would it look like from Darth Vader's POV?
  • GUGGENHEIM: A brief Star Wars homage.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: There's a lot of brief Star Wars homages in this movie.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: Seeing his own reflection in the, in the glass is really cool, too. It's something you couldn't really do normally.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, that... This is one of those things that with this medium, you can do things you can't do in hand-drawn animation nor can you do in live action. In thinking of what kind of toy Buzz Lightyear would be, we went back and we thought of all of our favorite toys as a kid, and tried to put in every cool thing we could remember in one toy. He's about the size of a GI Joe. You had Big Jim.
  • STANTON: Right, Big Jim. I wanted the karate-chop...
  • LASSETER, STANTON: Action.
  • STANTON: ...and then the...
  • LASSETER: The little wrist communicator...
  • STANTON: Wrist communicator, which came from the Big Jim Wolf Pack.
  • LASSETER: That's right.
  • STANTON: On the cover inside, 'cause we actually had the doll, it said "Made in China." And that gave us the idea for "Made in Taiwan"...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: ...to use later in the movie.
  • LASSETER: And we had this newer toy, that's... The Video Warrior, that had all those hilarious sampled voice sounds, and we thought, "This is definitely more of a modern toy that would have all this LED lights up, and the sampled sound..."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: "...and, of course, he had to glow in the dark."
  • STANTON: Right, right.
  • LASSETER: And Bob Pauley, one of the key designers in this film, he did an amazing job in taking all that and designing it to be, like, the toy of our dreams.
  • STANTON: I remember John saying, "I feel really sorry for the toy company that's really gotta make this."
  • GUGGENHEIM: And of course, you topped it off with the most modern of appliances, you put a laser on his arm.
  • STANTON: It's true.
  • LASSETER: Absolutely.
  • DOCTER: It's not a laser. It's a little light bulb that blinks.
  • LASSETER: But also, there's... There's a hint...
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: ...there's a hint of retro design to him, with the big, you know, clear globe for his head.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And it's one of those things...
  • STANTON: Which is, which is based on NASA, based on the actual astronaut suits...
  • LASSETER: Right, when they come out, when the astronauts come out and climb in there, they had that really cool, clear helmet. You know, glass helmet.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And of course, is all offset that when he opens his wrist communicator with the cheesy decal...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: ...that's underneath there.
  • STANTON: It's funny, we never... When it came to casting both of them, we always had Tom Hanks in mind and we had nobody else we wanted besides him, and we were so thankful when we got him.
  • LASSETER: For Woody, yeah.
  • STANTON: And is source, Tim Allen, it was actually John's idea. Tim Allen had just came out...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: ...with Home Improvement.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: A lot of us hadn't heard of him.
  • LASSETER: I was a big fan...
  • DOCTER: I don't know if this will...
  • LASSETER: Yeah, but I was a big fan and I thought he could do it. And what's interesting is our original idea for the personality of Buzz Lightyear was much more, he was a superhero. He was aware he was a superhero.
  • DOCTER: "I'll save you, young space cadet!" Yeah, sort of like Space Ghost.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, and it was more over the top. Tim Allen came in, and the first recording session back in Detroit, remember that? He was on hiatus and when we went back to Detroit, and he did it and he played it much more like a regular guy. And we came back and at first we thought, "This isn't anything like we expected." And we started cutting it in and we realized, "No, wait a minute, this is better." So, so from that we kind of evolved the character from being a superhero to more of being like a cop, a really well-trained space cop.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And he was much more honest that way. He looked at everything very straight-on.
  • STANTON: And it made him funnier. It made him absolutely funnier to take himself more seriously to take so much more...
  • LASSETER: In a much more... I mean, the audience can relate to him much more, you know?
  • STANTON: Yeah, yeah. To the level of what you would expect when you see a live-action actor. It was great to be able to play with all that.
  • LASSETER: We actually met Tom Hanks for the first time, he had just finished filming Philadelphia. And so we actually worked with him through the filming of both Forrest Gump and Apollo 13.
  • STANTON: Yeah. Matter of fact, by the time when we made the deal, Philadelphia had yet to come out, and those other two movies, and so it's funny... The same with Tim Allen's show skyrocketing. They became superstars after we got them signed. We were just like, "Thank you, God!"
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: You know, and that was happening while we were making this movie.
  • LASSETER: In this upcoming scene where Buzz flies around the room, it's sort of a Rube Goldberg kind of, kind of thing. But we have Buzz close his eyes, so in his mind he is flying across the room. But it is so impressive, the fact that he just happens to land on this ball, and, of course, we had to have Hot Wheels in this movie. And if you're gonna have a Hot Wheels, and you have to choose one car, it had to be the Red Baron.
  • STANTON: Yeah. There was no... There was no argument on that.
  • LASSETER: No argument on that, 'cause we're all Hot Wheels aficionados.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And there's also no argument about the ball. That's the ball that shows up in Luxo Jr. and in many other Pixar films over the years.
  • LASSETER: There's a lot of Pixar in-jokes throughout this. Of course, the Hot Wheels track is orange, which they hadn't made in 15 years.
  • STANTON: It showed out age, 'cause that's what we remember Hot Wheels tracks being.
  • LASSETER: Purple? They're different colors.
  • STANTON: We got flames and stuff now.
  • DOCTER: Kids these days.
  • STANTON: I don't know, it's all gone to pot.
  • LASSETER: Originally, we had like different sequences showing that Woody losing his world. They talked about it, we showed it in different ways. And Tom Schumacher the Senior VP at Disney in charge of Development for all the Feature Animation, he recommended, "Why don't you do it as a song, as sort of a montage?" And it was, like, "Ding! I could have a V8!" You know, it was a great idea. And so, what we did is we came up with all of those vignettes of how Woody's world would change. I know what happens in my house is when we get a new toy, it's like they have to get the sheets and the pajamas and everything. That's what we wanted to show. 'Cause Buzz Lightyear really is merchandising from some mythical show.
  • STANTON: Yes.
  • LASSETER: You know. And so we thought, not only would there be a toy, but there would be all the stuff that comes with a toy. And so there's one scene in Strange Things here, that is to me is one of the most telling scenes in the whole movie, is the bed was Woody's domain. And in that one scene, it's replaced with this gigantic image of Buzz Lightyear. So he lost his place, and I think that's one of the most telling scenes in the whole film. One of the things we tried to do too, is have moments with Buzz and the other toys that kind of reflect things that Woody was doing with the toys. Ash Brannon, who's one of the directing animators, he did this great stuff of the exercising.
  • DOCTER: Checking the pulse.
  • LASSETER: Checking the pulse.
  • GUGGENHEIM: It's too bad. It never really reads that you can see that Mr. Spell is actually reading out how many calories Buzz is burning.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. How many calories he's burning.
  • Randy Newman (singing): And I've lost the love of the one...
  • LASSETER: Well, I love this. Woody is just losing control. You know, he... We've established earlier in the film that he really has control over everything. He can send the green army men down. Everything's okay. Buzz arrives, he's losing control.
  • STANTON: Right. It's like there was two worlds that Woody had connected. He's losing Andy and his allegiance with all the toys. His sense of leadership with them.
  • GUGGENHEIM: What's great about this scene is the fact you reveal more about Woody in his reaction shots than you do when he's speaking.
  • STANTON: Exactly.
  • GUGGENHEIM: It's about his non-spoken reactions, non-verbal reactions.
  • LASSETER: We wrote the dialogue in wanting to say one thing, but through the acting, and the way that Tom Hanks and the actors performed it is to give the subtext that it's something completely different they're feeling.
  • STANTON: Right. That really comes back to the eyes again. I mean, we're fortunate because of the believability and the look of this kind of medium. People almost treat it like live-action. And we're allowed to do things with eyes to the level of what you expect when you see a live-action actor doing something, and it was great to play with all that. There's this, it's such a great adding... I think it was John's idea of Andy putting his name on the bottom of his toys. And it became such a great device for ownership, for bonds between Andy...
  • DOCTER: It was really...
  • GUGGENHEIM: An emotional...
  • DOCTER: ...a visual symbol of the bond between them.
  • LASSETER: It also showed the distance that time has come, because "Andy", the "Andy" written on Woody's foot is like a little kid. I think some of the letters are backwards and it's almost scratched off.
  • Woody: Alright, that it!
  • GUGGENHEIM: And now we come to one of your favorite moments, Bonnie.
  • ARNOLD: I know, it is. I think it's just one of my favorite acting moments, is what is really is.
  • GUGGENHEIM: I think it's a great revelation of the power of animation to convey character and story. And it's all done in this one shot here. And Woody doesn't do much more than turn his head. And yet it conveys so much of Woody's personality and his belief that Buzz is a complete buffoon.
  • ARNOLD: Buzz is a complete idiot.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: I remember in that scene, when Woody accidentally opens Buzz's helmet. Doug Sweetland did a really rough pass on it. And he has this great overacting of Buzz gasping for air and falling down at Woody's feet and stuff. And then he didn't have time to do the scene of Woody, so he had Woody kind of literally just turn his head. And I remember seeing it in dailies, and we were...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Contrast is great.
  • LASSETER: ...on the floor laughing.
  • DOCTER: Yeah, it's great.
  • LASSETER: Just on the floor laughing. And I said, "Don't animate that shot. Just..."
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: "Just add a little eye blink, that's it, you're done!" It is so hilarious.
  • DOCTER: And he didn't listen to you.
  • LASSETER: He over-animated it and I made him go back and strip out all of his animation.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: Right.
  • Woody: Hey, guys, look! It's the real Buzz Lightyear!
  • LASSETER: I remember the recording session with Tom Hanks doing this. We would wear Tom Hanks out every single recording session. He would leave... He said his diaphragm hurt for three days after recording.
  • STANTON: He would say like, "I think all my character does is scream in this movie."
  • LASSETER (LAUGHS): Yeah.
  • STANTON: And we'd go, "No, no, no. Don't worry, don't worry."
  • LASSETER: But that laugh, is just, it's so funny. It just goes on and on and on, and it really made that scene.
  • ARNOLD: This is the moment when Sid is introduced into the picture. Our villain.
  • LASSETER: And Sid Phillips, the bad kid next door, is really Andrew Stanton and Joe Ranft wrapped together.
  • STANTON: Our childhoods together.
  • LASSETER: I mean, Joe. Joe would trash his toys so fast. He said that, like, Christmas evening, all of his toys were broken.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: That he got that morning. And actually, I remember Andrew, you were telling me a story, that what you did to one of your broken GI Joes as a kid, and I said, "That has got to be the introduction of Sid."
  • STANTON: Right. So this, him with the Combat Carl out there in the backyard, is something I actually did with my friend Keith Nolton when we were 8 years old, out in his parents' field. And we strapped an M-80 to the back of a GI Joe...
  • LASSETER: Then you put him in a running pose and said, "Run, Joe! Run! Run, you're never gonna make it!" And you blew him up.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Andrew, Keith Nolton, is he out on parole?
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • ARNOLD: Actually, if you look closely... It may be obscured, but there are body parts that go flying up in the air from the poor toy soldier, and I think there was a moment of concern about how gruesome that would be.
  • LASSETER: Well, we wanted GI Joe. 'Cause I had GI Joes as I was a kid. I lived for my GI Joes.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: GI Joes and Hot Wheels were most important to me.
  • DOCTER: But funny, they wouldn't let us use it.
  • LASSETER: And Hasbro, Ralph. Hasbro wouldn't let us use it, because...
  • STANTON: We're blow him up.
  • LASSETER: ...we would blow him up.
  • GUGGENHEIM: They did like us blowing up our favorite toy.
  • LASSETER: Loren Carpenter, one of our...
  • GUGGENHEIM: One of our technical directors.
  • STANTON: Came up with virtual reality.
  • LASSETER: Virtual reality.
  • STANTON: Virtual reality. See, I can't even say it.
  • DOCTER: I thought only a few people would get...
  • LASSETER: Everybody gets it.
  • DOCTER: In the theaters, yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Oh, the adults always get it, yeah.
  • ARNOLD: This sequence up here in Andy's room is so nice just because it's sort of a magic hour lighting, and it's so beautiful. The really did a good job.
  • LASSETER: "Get off me!"
  • GUGGENHEIM: "Get outta here."
  • ARNOLD: The Magic 8-Ball is such a big hit too at this moment.
  • LASSETER: Had to be there.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Even Woody consults the Magic 8-Ball.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: We studied all the options of what he could say.
  • STANTON: Right. "Don't count on it" was the winner.
  • GUGGENHEIM: But again, it was a great revelation about the world of toys, that these toys know how to use each other is appropriate, right?
  • LASSETER: Woody's basically a nice guy, but he's been pushed to the edge. And so, so this is sort of an innocent thing, he's just trying to get him stuck behind the desk, which we all know is a place you lose toys. And when we were designing this, we were sitting there watching Raiders of the Lost Ark, and we looked at it and we said, "This is what we want." We want that giant boulder rolling down...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Rolling ball.
  • LASSETER: ...where the escalation goes, and it's gotten way out of hand. And even the sound of the push pins flying down and hitting on the desk around Buzz, those are actually the sound effects from that sequence. So we have...
  • STANTON: The arrows in Raiders of the Lost Ark.
  • LASSETER: ...the arrows in the beginning of Raiders of the Lost Ark and also the actual sound of the big boulder rolling from Raiders.
  • DOCTER: Just a little.
  • LASSETER: And Craig Good did a great job in staging this, so that with these, he called them Spielberg cams, these kinda camera moves would...
  • STANTON: Swoop under.
  • LASSETER: ...swoop under Woody and Buzz both, to give this impending like, "Oh, my goodness."
  • DOCTER: Originally we had Woody intentionally push Buzz out of the window.
  • LASSETER: But he was going too far. And so that's why we made it much more of an innocent...
  • DOCTER: He meant to just stick him behind the dresser. The Lassie reference.
  • STANTON: "What is it, boy?"
  • LASSETER: Andrew and I were driving once, and we came up with this idea that R.C. can't talk, and so they communicate to him. And so it's like a Lassie movie.
  • STANTON: Put him in the defender. "What is it, boy? He's trying to say something."
  • LASSETER: Yeah, he's like, "Timmy's down a well?" (LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: And the lighting here I really like, too. It's a dramatic warm and cool that really punches the attitude.
  • EGGLESTON: That's really important to me, because that's what it's about is supporting the story and the emotion and kind of helping ground it visually.
  • LASSETER: I love that, "I don't like confrontations."
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: Being chewed out by a little green army man... You just wouldn't want to be in that.
  • LASSETER: I remember Lee Ermey, in the recording session, it's like we said, "Okay, this is it." And he actually wrote some of that being chewed out, and he says it's like poetry, you know? And he just took a deep breath and just laid into it. And I think the needles went to red on that. And he just, he just chewed out Woody like you can't believe.
  • DOCTER: This is the most probably difficult scene in the film, but Ash Brannon got to animate.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, it's by farther the most complex.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Everything's animated here.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. Having all those army men climb all over him...
  • STANTON: All the characters...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Then everything goes to quiet.
  • LASSETER: And this is one of the funniest scenes, I think. After Andy's coming and looking for Buzz, and Woody looks over and sees Potato Head and Etch A Sketch. It's a really... It's very funny, but it also is such a great story point that he is dead meat.
  • GUGGENHEIM: This really seals his fate.
  • STANTON: Right, and you don't have to do it with dialogue. It's always great with dialogue.
  • NARRATOR: Director John Lasseter.
  • LASSETER: I think we all had this feeling of when we finally saw this stuff lit, it was just like...
  • STANTON: "We're outside!"
  • LASSETER: Yes, it's like to this point in the movie everything pretty much was inside or looking out to Sid's backyard.
  • NARRATOR: Art director Ralph Eggleston.
  • EGGLESTON: It really blew everybody away. It was the first glimpse of the outside world we got in 3-D. It wasn't just a flat or a painting like it's been up to now.
  • LASSETER: Barrel of Monkeys.
  • DOCTER: I get that idea.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, and I love... I love the line, "We need more monkeys." And in fact I think, Ralph, that was your motto throughout the whole production...
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • LASSETER: ...trying to get more people to work.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Whenever we needed more people.
  • LASSETER: We need more monkeys.
  • Rex: Where could he be?
  • EGGLESTON: This is a... This is a tribute to Bob Pauley in a lot of ways. (LAUGHS) Bob and John and I kind of... We all kind of have an affinity for '50s-style architecture. And so we went around town and took a lot of photographs of '50s-style, Googie-style...
  • LASSETER: Googie-style gas stations.
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah. Bob's had a field day on that kind of stuff.
  • Woody: ...accident?
  • NARRATOR: Supervising animator Pete Docter.
  • DOCTER: This whole bug gag, too, was really cool, because it's all this exposition. He's talking and talking and you don't really need to hear it, and so seeing this visual bug, the goo smeared...
  • LASSETER: Well, I remember it's one of those things that I had to fight, I pleaded to let us model the bug.
  • DOCTER: It wasn't in the schedule to model the bug.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, model a bug. In fact, I think in hindsight, I wish we had covered him...
  • LASSETER, DOCTER: Completely with bugs.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: But that would've been a bit over.
  • Buzz: ...not an idea we promote on my planet.
  • Woody: Oh...
  • DOCTER: This whole fight sequence was a great chance to parody classic fight, you know, like Arnold Schwarzenegger fight scenes.
  • STANTON: It's great, using the toy elements for this fight.
  • LASSETER: Right. And, in fact, there was this one point when Woody is punching Buzz's face. And actually, I feel like we had kind of gone too far, right here.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: But when they added the squeak sound, I would say, "Okay, okay. It's a toy again."
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yeah, it plays. It plays.
  • LASSETER: It plays.
  • Andy: Yeah!
  • NARRATOR: Producer Bonnie Arnold.
  • ARNOLD: This is actually my favorite scene in the movie. First of all, it's the most beautiful scene with the... I remember the first time I saw it rendered with the stars and the moon.
  • NARRATOR: Co-writer Andrew Stanton.
  • STANTON: When the car pulls away, that emotional point is really the figurehead moment that really started the whole idea of Toy Story. We had this image of a toy being left behind, and seeing its owner drive off, and thinking, what if a toy was looking for you as hard as you were looking for your favorite toy?
  • Buzz: ...huge refueling station of some sort.
  • Woody: You!
  • NARRATOR: Producer Ralph Guggenheim.
  • GUGGENHEIM: One of the great things about the way the story evolved on Toy Story is the way that we were able to pack in a number of different developments in the story all into one scene. I mean, this is not only a scene when Buzz and Woody get seperated, but it's also the scene in which Woody confronts Buzz with the fact that he's a toy, and we set up the enmity between them that is essential for any buddy picture.
  • Woody: Shut up! Just shut up, you idiot!
  • STANTON: This scene under the truck was probably the most hammered sequence from a writing standpoint. We always knew what we wanted. We wanted them to have such strong opinions and anger at each other, but neither of them saw the world the same way. And we feel that, now, how it is, is exactly how we want you as the audience to feel, but it took us so many passes to finally get that across.
  • LASSETER: I'm very, very proud of this, by more so than any other scene in the film. In this sequence, you have the wonderful opportunity where each character looks at the other and says "You are the craziest person I have ever met in my life." And as the audience member, you know exactly where they're coming from.
  • Woody: You... Are... A... Toy!
  • ARNOLD: "You are a toy!" I just love that. Oh, actually, that was my idea for using as a title of the film when we weren't sure it would be Toy Story. I thought You Are a Toy might make a good title.
  • LASSETER: A lot of people don't get that.
  • GUGGENHEIM: The Star Trek salute.
  • LASSETER: Star Trek, yeah.
  • Woody: ...loony.
  • ARNOLD: "Good riddance, you loony." I love that. It's so Tom Hanks too, or Woody as I should say.
  • EGGLESTON: It's the Pizza Planet truck. It's everybody's worst nightmare, a pizza driver.
  • LASSETER (LAUGHS): Right.
  • EGGLESTON: You know, he's got... You know, the half hour or it's free. You know?
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • EGGLESTON: And this guy, he's like a heavy metal dude, you know, and you can see that he doesn't really take care of his truck very well. And he drives like a maniac.
  • LASSETER: It's very unsanitary, too.
  • EGGLESTON: Very unsanitary. I mean, would you buy a pizza from this guy? Unbelievable. Look at all the rust. There's just, lots of detail put on this truck.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: And here is again, Glenn McQueen. He does this fantastic scene of Woody here. (LAUGHING) This grin at the end just kills me. (LAUGHING) Right there. Gets me every time. That was completely unexpected. I remember in dailies when it happened we were all howling with laughter.
  • STANTON: It's what you always love from the artists work in a film, that you can pass them off a great idea that you already like and then they plussed it all even more so. It feeds everybody else and if you can get that across the board, it's just such a luxury to have when you're making a picture.
  • LASSETER: This scene, when Woody climbs into the back of the Pizza Planet truck, was a much longer scene. It was, had this comedy where he is just getting beat up by this, this tool chest. In fact, we have some hilarious, very early stuff that Tom Hanks did for us. Some very funny sort of stuff where he's getting all... He starts calling this tool box "El Rojo."
  • (Woody screams)
  • STANTON: Now we come to Pizza Planet, which, actually for the longest time, was Pizza Putt.
  • LASSETER: That's right... It was a miniature golf course, pizza parlor/miniature golf course, and it's...
  • STANTON: It's almost embarrassing because we... It seems so obvious now that we... This was something to delude Buzz to think that he's getting home. And it has all the space themes in it, but for...
  • LASSETER: Who could, who could?
  • STANTON: ...two or three years, it did not exist. And at the last minute, we're like "Wait a minute... Minute..." (HOME IMPROVEMENT GRUNT) Duh. "A spaced-themed, you know, pizza restaurant."
  • LASSETER: Right. (LAUGHS)
  • EGGLESTON: If you look carefully at the two sentry guards at the front gate, we've got little lights in their eyes like in...
  • LASSETER: The cylons in Battlestar Galactica. The staffs have got a slice of pizza.
  • GUGGENHEIM: They have the slice of pizza, and a pepperoni shield.
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah, pepperoni shield, that's right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's one of the most elaborate sets we've built, given the short amount of time that we spend here.
  • STANTON: Right, and it was so great that it was coming from Disney as a movie, because it's such their, their stuff...
  • LASSETER: My goal was to make it so every kid in America wanted to go to Pizza Planet.
  • STANTON: They've got to make this place.
  • LASSETER: They've got to build it. It's just too cool.
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah. I would wanna eat there.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And here's the killer shot.
  • DOCTER: Yeah. Poor Rex Grignon had to animate this shot with more humans than...
  • LASSETER: Seventeen humans?
  • DOCTER: And they're very complex models.
  • STANTON: He's dead now.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: He's still working on the shot, in fact. He'll be done next week.
  • DOCTER: He finished it pretty quickly.
  • LASSETER: Whack A Alien!
  • GUGGENHEIM: A lot of fun.
  • LASSETER: I mean, it's one of those things... With Whack A Alien, it was an homage to Alien.
  • STANTON: Oh yeah.
  • LASSETER: You know, and, what cracked me up is so many people say, "Why doesn't it say, 'Whack An Alien'?"
  • DOCTER: If you look carefully at the people, notice that they all resemble Andy somewhat similarly.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: Andy and Mom and Molly.
  • GUGGENHEIM: With different hairstyles and different skin color.
  • LASSETER: One of the things that we do every now and then is we have what we call "Gag Sessions." So what we tend to do is get some people who we think are really funny...
  • STANTON: Fresh meat.
  • LASSETER: Fresh meat. And come in to help sort of stir some, some ideas. Probably the crowning achievement of that meeting was we had this idea that they would get caught in a crane game. And it was shaped like a spaceship and Buzz would percieve this as a way to get home, and it's a way that they get caught by Sid. We kept saying, "What's in this?" We originally had these little plastic pizza slices with sunglasses on.
  • DOCTER: A takeoff of all the stupid logo characters...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: ...that exist.
  • LASSETER: And so, and we were contemplating it, and then it was Gary Trousdale, the director at Disney of Beauty and the Beast and Hunchback of Notre Dame, he all of a sudden said, "Buzz would come in there and say, 'Who's your leader?' and they naturally would say, 'The claw.'" And as soon as he said...
  • STANTON: And then the room exploded.
  • LASSETER: We were howling with laughter and we immediately realized, "Well, yes, if you're a toy and you're alive and your life is only in this glass box..."
  • STANTON: That's all it's...
  • LASSETER: And occasionally, this claw would come down and take one of you, and take you away. Pretty soon, you would start worshiping that.
  • STANTON: That's why it's so funny, 'cause it makes sense.
  • ARNOLD: It was our actors on helium to be the Martians.
  • GUGGENHEIM: All inhaling lots of helium and reading lines.
  • ARNOLD: I think, to be honest, it ended up mostly Jeff Pidgeon.
  • DOCTER: It cracks me up.
  • STANTON: I loved being in a theater when this scene came across because people would go, "I can't believe what I'm seeing and I'm having so much fun seeing it!" And you know, you're just like, "Yeah!" It became this running theme to constantly touch on every science fiction icon we could with Buzz Lightyear. Close Encounters. Them all wanting to touch him.
  • LASSETER: The other homage to Close Encounters is when they point out to the claw, is just like when they asked "Where did the sound come from?"
  • STANTON: Right. In India, right.
  • LASSETER: But the tension of this is actually... Really, it's very funny, but it's also very tense.
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: And it's also completely unrealistic to the crane...
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: What a crane can really hang onto it.
  • LASSETER: But we said, "We don't care."
  • STANTON: "It's the movies."
  • LASSETER: Someone asked me that. I said, "This is an animated movie, we can do whatever we want."
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: But we really tried to be as realistically physically as we could...
  • STANTON: Tried to avoid them.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And a great transition here that sets up their new predicament.
  • LASSETER: It's one of my favorite transitions.
  • DOCTER: It's very subtle, isn't it?
  • LASSETER: This is evil! This house is evil!
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • EGGLESTON: This is also the first opportunity you really get to see Buzz Lightyear's glow-in-the-dark. Very clearly, all the green on him, it was really lots of fun.
  • STANTON: I had so much fun adding... I wrote that line of him saying, "Would you be quiet?" What I loved about it was it gave you the sense that this alien had been jabbering the entire ride from Pizza Planet.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: He was so excited, 'cause he's getting closer to nirvana, you know? Lee Unkrich, our editor, said a friend of his used to set... Get his dog to sit down and set dog treats on his nose, and he would sit there with this dog treat on his nose until he said, "Okay, you can eat it." And I said, "That's the way that Sid's gotta feed Scud the little alien."
  • Sid: Look, Janie.
  • EGGLESTON: And we get into Sid's house, which is avacado green and harvest gold.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: It was your mission!
  • EGGLESTON: That's right, that's right.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Two of your favorite colors.
  • EGGLESTON: Definitely. I was like, early '70s Home and Garden. We found some great magazines from that period that we really played up on.
  • Sid: Prepare the OR, stat!
  • EGGLESTON: When we get to Sid's house, it's supposed to be evil and dark. And you know, we wanted to have fun with it, too. The actual dark place is Sid's room. The house itself, we had a kind of back off on and just say, "It's ugly and you wouldn't want to live there, necessarily," but Sid's room is really the darkest place.
  • LASSETER: It's a tribute to bad taste.
  • EGGLESTON: It's a tribute to bad taste is right.
  • Sid: ...done it! Hannah.
  • LASSETER: You know, a lot of people think Sid is so horrible, but really he is the most creative character in the whole film.
  • STANTON: He's not evil, he's just misunderstood.
  • EGGLESTON: That's right.
  • LASSETER: Every time you see him, he is play-acting, you know, really creatively.
  • STANTON: I tell people...
  • GUGGENHEIM: No different than Andy.
  • STANTON: Exactly. I tell people that I said well maybe just because it's defensive 'cause it's what I was like as kid but I think that... I think that Sid's more true... That Sid had more imagination than anybody in the movie. I mean, everything he's doing like they're saying, he's play-acting, and I think that's how most kids act with their toys.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • Woody: Locked. There's gotta be another way out of here.
  • LASSETER: Sid's room really represnted the absolute opposite, in every way of Andy's room. We wanted Andy's room to be light and friendly and airy and the toys are well taken care of. And in Sid's room, it's dark, it's always dark, no matter what time of day. And everything is trashed, and all of his toys are just really treated badly. And so, to manifest that, we thought that, well, this guy, in thinking of him as being creative, Sid, he would take his toys apart to figure out how they work. And he would...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...put them back together in different ways.
  • STANTON: He's not just into destruction. He's into, just...
  • LASSETER: He seemed plays.
  • STANTON: A twisted sense of fun.
  • LASSETER: Right, and so we thought well, this... So... So also, we wanted to give the feeling to the audience and to the two main characters that if Sid's in the room, you're gonna die. Right? You're just, you're gonna die. And then, when Sid's out of the room, you know, we have this moment of like, "Okay, he's out of the room, let's find a way out of here." But immediately we want to give the feeling like, "Uh-oh. There's something alive in here."
  • GUGGENHEIM: There's still something going on.
  • LASSETER: It's sort of like going camping. And you know, like just in the darkness you hear noises and like, "There's something alive out there and I know it's gonna eat me." So to give... To make the main characters completely uncomfortable the entire time...
  • DOCTER: Even with Sid out of the room, they're still in trouble.
  • STANTON: Right. The danger's still there. And I think that we never even considered any other option than making the mutant toys mute.
  • Woody: Aw, great. Great. Yeah, and if anyone attacks us, we can blink 'em to death.
  • DOCTER: Rex is still working at it.
  • STANTON: Right, right.
  • DOCTER: Everybody else is...
  • LASSETER: I love that.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • Rex: Buzz...
  • DOCTER: Faithful Rex.
  • LASSETER: You know, and I also love the fact that they know the cat. They know this neighborhood. Whiskers... They know. You know, "Get outta here."
  • GUGGENHEIM: Just like they know Sid. Just like they know Scud.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • Rex: They're home.
  • LASSETER: Why doesn't Mom see a flashlight coming out of her window? Shh. She was turning...
  • DOCTER: Oh.
  • STANTON: Pay no attention to that man!
  • Andy: Mom, have you seen Woody?
  • STANTON: And now the familar scenario we've all been in where you can't find something, and your mother tells you "You're just not looking hard enough."
  • DOCTER: "Where was the last place you looked?"
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: How many times have we heared that?
  • Bo Peep: Woody's gone?
  • Hamm: Uh, boy...
  • LASSETER: I really like also this little moment, quiet moment, between Slinky and Bo, It's like two people who still believe in him. They just kind of look at each other, and it's really...
  • STANTON: This transition never worked in the story reels, but once it was rendered it was great.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Gorgeous.
  • STANTON: From night to day.
  • DOCTER: Here we go right into the torture.
  • STANTON: Back into our Star Wars homage.
  • LASSETER: Star Wars homage number 458. Well, this is actually sort of in between a Star Wars homage and that Nazi interrogator from Raides of the Lost Ark.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: You know?
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • LASSETER: We were down at Disney and we were talking to Mike Gabriel, who's one of the directors of Pocahontas. We were taking about all the things we used to do with our toys as kids, and he said, "When I was a kid, I used to burn things with a magnifying glass. You're gonna have that in the film, aren't you?" And Andrew and I would look at each other and said...
  • LASSETER, STANTON: "We are now!"
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • NARRATOR: Supervising technical director Bill Reeves.
  • REEVES: The particle system effects was the main tool used for doing all the smoke and the sparks. And that kind of stuff was a technique called particle systems where you model a lot of very simple shapes and you sort of blend... There's a lot of them, so they add together to create an effect.
  • Woody: The door.
  • DOCTER: So even though Buzz is deluded, he is in control of the situation. He's a superhero.
  • LASSETER: That's right. He knows what to do...
  • STANTON: I... I was...
  • LASSETER: ...in case of danger.
  • STANTON: I was lucky that I got to board this sequence, and this is where I came up with using the karate chop arm to... For Buzz to defend him... For Woody to defend himself with Buzz.
  • LASSETER: I love this.
  • STANTON: It was such a great fun moment to do.
  • LASSETER: It was another geat moment to do.
  • GUGGENHEIM: It's another great moment to do, revealing moment about toys.
  • LASSETER: Well, I think the best thing about it is Buzz's line, "How you doing that?"
  • STANTON: Right. It's like playing off this weird, illogical logic.
  • LASSETER: This scene when I was showing it to my kids at home in an early version, this is the one that my kids always put their head under the blanket. One of the things that we always tried to do in these two characters is show contrast. How Buzz would do something in control and Woody would do something, he's a complete wimp. And, I think, this is one of my favorite ones, is a simple thing of Buzz running across this opening. He runs across and then he motions, you know, like, Woody to go on. And then Woody, just crawling like a complete scaredy-cat.
  • STANTON: It was great contrast.
  • ARNOLD: This is one of those moments where I thought, "That dog sounds too much like a tiger." But I was overruled.
  • LASSETER: I think that was some of the T. rex breathing...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...from Jurassic Park. Yeah.
  • DOCTER: This scene where he opens his eye and it dialates.
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yes.
  • LASSETER: I mean, that's straight out of Jurassic Park.
  • GUGGENHEIM: There was a controversy over Scud's whiskers at one point. But Eben Ostby, our, associate technical director came in on a weekend and created whiskers for Scud, and did them in record time. And those whiskers definitely add to his cheerful demenor.
  • ARNOLD: Right. This is the moment in the movie where Buzz really realizes that he's toy. Woody's told him, but he doesn't really realize it until he actually sees this commercial about Buzz Lightyear toys, and they're available everywhere.
  • STANTON: If it's not the Army Man, I always hear this sequence is probably people's favorite sequence. When we first did it, it was very '50s in retro because we thought that was fun. But then we were asked by Disney to make it more modern and we started looking at modern day commercial and they're just assaultive, they attack kids.
  • LASSETER: They're assaultive. So we thought...
  • GUGGENHEIM: So we brought in Penn Jillette.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. Who can be the most assaultive voice we can get? We got Penn Jillette, of Penn and Teller, the great magician. He is so loud. And so we had him record it. And...
  • GUGGENHEIM: He was incredible.
  • LASSETER: He was so loud that they said in the lobby of the recording studio they could hear him through the soundproof walls.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Soundproof walls.
  • STANTON: Actually, we're here. Ralph, John and I all got to be the male chorus with him.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • STANTON: The "Buzz Lightyear."
  • GUGGENHEIM: Oh.
  • LASSETER: Ready? One, two, three...
  • LASSETER, GUGGENHEIM, STANTON: Buzz Lightyear!
  • LASSETER: There you go.
  • DOCTER: Very nice.
  • STANTON: It says "Made in Taiwan." You know, it's like he's never... It's like it was there all the time but he never saw it.
  • LASSETER: He never saw it.
  • STANTON: Never looked.
  • LASSETER: Never even realized what it was about, yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And now comes one of the songs that, just, is a great example of why Randy Newman was the perfect fit for writing the score and songs in this movie. He can combine all of his ability in writing great rock and roll songs with songs that evoke incredible, heartfelt sympathy for a character.
  • STANTON: I love this shot, because it's like hitting the nail on the head as many times as you can. "I wanna fly." It's okay, let's show an open window, and let's show a bird flying!
  • LASSETER: And then Woody says... What does Woody say?
  • STANTON: "You're a toy. You can't fly!" Like okay, now let's have an airplane go by. Now let's a balloon go past, it's...
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • STANTON: Get it? Symbolism!
  • GUGGENHEIM: Here comes the Hindenburg!
  • LASSETER: And you're a little, little guy in the world.
  • STANTON: "You can't fly."
  • GUGGENHEIM: I love those traction boots he's got on.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: He climbs really well.
  • STANTON: Translucent wings.
  • DOCTER: He's a superhero.
  • LASSETER: Actually, in that shot, is he climbs up is probably one of the few places you could see his copyright Disney embossed on his behind.
  • GUGGENHEIM; There it is.
  • LASSETER: There it is. Right there. Copyright Disney.
  • EGGLESTON: And here is where it's just kind of gray-green sky, and it's kind of overcast. And there's a little light seeping through the clouds. Very, very, very subtle lighting here, and it's getting subtly darker through all of this.
  • GUGGENHEIM: I was riding down on the airplane this morning, and a kid saw that I had a Toy Story briefcase. He was like, he had to be six years old, sitting next to me. He said, "I saw that movie. There scene where he loses his arm. That was really sad."
  • LASSETER: There was a lot of worry that by having... You know, dismembering one of your main characters was going too far.
  • GUGGENHEIM: How are we gonna...?
  • LASSETER: And how are we gonna deal with this? So we deal it in the classic Pixar way, we started making fun of his dismembered arm as fast as we can.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: Hey, if Potato Head's not enough, let's have another dismembered character.
  • Sid's Mom: What, dear? What was that?
  • Hannah: Never mind.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Hannah, in her own demented way...
  • (door opening)
  • LASSETER: Most painful scene in the film, right?
  • DOCTER: We used to have a whole sequence of Woody in the closet.
  • STANTON: That's a painful.
  • LASSETER: Actually, it's funny 'cause we had Tom Hanks saying that normal, and when he saw this in our last session, he goes, "Oh, wait, wait. Back up, back up. I gotta do this again." He kinda did like this.
  • DOCTER: Yeah, it was very nice.
  • LASSETER: It was really funny.
  • ARNOLD: The next scene, the tea party scene, one of the things that we felt like wasn't working was the fact that Buzz was sort of catatonic after his fall.
  • GUGGENHEIM: There... There were two things. One is that Buzz was catatonic after his fall, and the other one was that from the moment that Buzz gets into Sid's... Buzz and Woody get into Sid's hands that the movie takes a real grim turn and there was no comic relief in all of this. And so, once again, our story guys, with Joe Ranft and Andrew Stanton, were able to pull of masterful bit of work by combining both a comic moment and something that reveals a lot about Buzz's character, and his situation here.
  • LASSETER: And it's one... It's actually one of the best performances, too, of the whole character Tim Allen did. It was one of the last things we did with him and it was so funny, 'cause we... You know, he tried it and sort of demented and stuff, and finally we said, "You're... You're just drunk, you're drunk on tea." You know? And he did this hilarious performance.
  • STANTON: Woody slaps Buzz, if you notice, with his own hand. Which was inspired from Commando. We were just, "Yes, it was."
  • LASSETER: "The Arnold Schwarzennger Story."
  • STANTON: We heared about this story in the movie Commando where he gets hidden in the shed and this whole army of South American army is gonna like, attack him. And he cuts off this guy's arm with a machete, and he asked the director if he could... "How about in the next take I pick up his arm and I smash him with his own fist?" And the director, I think it was McTiernan, that just said, "I think that's going a little too far." Arnold.
  • LASSETER: Arnold.
  • STANTON: And I just remembered that we were doing this, like, "Yeah, we can do it!"
  • LASSETER: "Let's do that!"
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • DOCTER: This Battleship sequence, I think, shows what the toys do when they're waiting for something more exciting to happen.
  • LASSETER: Right. You know, what I like about it is it's strip Battleship.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • LASSETER: You know, and he wants the nose.
  • GUGGENHEIM: "I want the nose. Gimme the nose."
  • LASSETER: He's already wearing the hat.
  • STANTON: But look how bad a player...
  • LASSETER: So if you really look at it, he's covered the board with hits and just little squares where the boats are.
  • STANTON: He's just missed everything but the boats. He's that stupid.
  • DOCTER: He's also personality...
  • LASSETER: And he grouped all of his ships together in exactly the same spot.
  • DOCTER: So if you hit one.
  • LASSETER: You hit one, you got 'em all.
  • DOCTER (LAUGHING): Right.
  • Woody: Boy, am I glad to see you guys!
  • LASSETER: This, the purpose of this scene was to just show kind of the desperation of Woody. It starts out with much... It's such a good idea. He is really... He's gonna get saved, this is great. And as the scene goes on, no one will help him and it gets worse. And so he starts out at one level and he ends it much worse off. It's sort of the thing that we've looked at. Every one... Every scene in Toy Story, we always try to have the beginning and end be opposite, where he starts out in a good position, ends in a bad position or vice-versa. We found that Tom Hanks is really good with props. Because I brought to this recording session a fake severed arm that my son, my teenage son has, that we used to close in car doors and stuff like that. So I brought it to the session and gave it to Tom, and I said, "Just ad-lib." This is... I explained the scene, "You're supposed to be doing a little puppet show with Buzz's arm to convince the toys Buzz is alive." And he took off and he did the funniest routine. Just one ad-lib after another. He did where he's reading Buzz's palm. He has Buzz giving him a back rub.
  • STANTON: Scrub.
  • LASSETER: "Oh, Buzz. Oh. Yeah, a little lower. Ohh!"
  • DOCTER: "Magic fingers."
  • LASSETER: "Magic fingers," that's right. "Buzz, you got magic fingers." And it was so hilarious, and a lot of this was used, like the secret best friend handshake.
  • STANTON: But you know, we put him through a lot of props. He had to put his face in a pillow when he was shoved in the bed. That thing. He had to wear a bonnet for a while for some scene we didn't have anymore.
  • LASSETER: Well, actually it's because...
  • GUGGENHEIM: That was the scene that never made it in.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: Well, it's because... Because of this scene we realized he was so good at props, that from then on, anytime he had something, we had these props for him and he was great!
  • Mr. Potato Head: Ya creep!
  • LASSETER: When they find out that Woody has a severed arm, I think the moment is so touching for me because of Slinky. The dog's had so much faith in Woody. He's held out and believed him, and here is proof positive. And the expression is so great, and the fact that he just simply closes the blinds is a wonderful thing here. It's really emotional.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Even with this shot coming up with the clouds over the house.
  • EGGLESTON: Right, that's a painting.
  • LASSETER: Right, that's a painting and the movement was created by morphing.
  • EGGLESTON: Right, right.
  • Woody: Buzz!
  • LASSETER: And then now, the mutant toys are eating him alive. That's what we really wanted to give the feeling of, Woody and the audience, that they're just feeding him and he's still alive. But Woody's doing something selfless for the first time.
  • STANTON: Instinctually, he's going after to help Buzz.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Well, because Woody...
  • STANTON: Seen really.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Woody's in a place now where all his options are exhausted.
  • STANTON: Right. Buzz is all he's got.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • LASSETER: But it's this wonderful moment when you find out they fixed him and they you see the other toys.
  • STANTON: That's what's really nice with the whole audience, you watch them do the same thing.
  • LASSETER: And all of a sudden, they go back in their mind and say, "Wait a minute, all along these characters were good. They're selfless." And you look back to when you thought they were cannibals, and they're simply taking the parts of the toys as quickly as they can out of the way of Sid.
  • STANTON: And when they blocked the doorway, they were trying to warn him about Scud. You go back, you start reading all that in a different way.
  • LASSETER: So it's all this double entendre, double purposes for everything that the mutant toys have done.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And then it's back to business as usual, 'cause Sid is coming back up to the room.
  • ARNOLD: Right.
  • STANTON: We used to get a lot of weird logic police people going, "It's like 5:00 or 6:00. Where did... How did he get this box so late from the postal service? Who delivers packages that late?"
  • LASSETER: We're like, "I don't think people will notice."
  • STANTON: Who cares?
  • DOCTER: He just got home.
  • EGGLESTON: I love this Fat Cow Farms milk crate that Sid stole from the back of Safeway. You know? And... And somewhere stamped on it, it says, "You will be punished to the maximum extent of the law if you steal this." And, of course, Sid had no qualms with that.
  • LASSETER: One of the reasons that we did this convoluted thing of getting Woody in that milk crate is for having him trapped in it. And then the convoluted thing of Sid taking the toolbox and lifting it all the way on top of the milk crate...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: ...to get the tape out. Right? I mean, no one ever notices it, but it was done just so...
  • GUGGENHEIM: So now Woody is trapped.
  • LASSETER: Woody would be trapped.
  • EGGLESTON: The rain effect is one of those shots that looks very simple but very hard to do.
  • REEVES: Basically, you know, the lead technical person on the rain was Tom Porter. This is a little particle system shot that was used in a couple other places, but in particular here. The rain on the window was a major challenge. And then we watched... What was...?
  • LASSETER: In Cold Blood.
  • REEVES: In Cold Blood was the movie we used as the lead-in to this, or our conceptual thing. We watched that a lot and got some really great ideas from there.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • REEVES: Inspiration kinds of stuff to make this be very moody.
  • LASSETER: Karen Kiser, she has two sons, and she's such a great mom. And this was like... She did such a great job with this scene 'cause there's a real sensitive quiality to the animation of both Andy and the mom.
  • STANTON: It's just computer animation.
  • LASSETER (LAUGHS): What?
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: It's not real?
  • LASSETER: This is with computers? I just love, so much, is Rex. It's like, he's so nervous about traveling. You know? And then the fact that these two guys are stuck together. "No one else would pick me!"
  • DOCTER: It's also a great set up, for a contrast to the scene coming up next. Where it's a little bit of light comedy and then we go into the serious stuff.
  • Bo Peep: If only you could see how much Andy misses you.
  • (rain pouring down)
  • NARRATOR: Producer Ralph Guggenheim.
  • GUGGENHEIM: This is probably the most heart-felt scene between Buzz and Woody, the scene where Woody finally reveals how important he understands Buzz is. And he does it out of desperation to get out of this state of depression he's in.
  • ARNOLD: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And at the same time, it tells us exactly what the rules of the world are here, as seen by Woody through his experienced eyes.
  • NARRATOR: Director John Lasseter.
  • LASSETER: I'm so proud of this scene because it's extremely... Extremely kind of complex as far as having a minimal amount of words and trying to get a lot of meaning.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And there's so much said in the subtlety, the facial acting, as well as the words. And also by keeping Woody sort behind these bars and having to make it so you can see his eyes through the one opening there, it really kind of contained him and so it really I think helped keep the acting real subtle and minimal.
  • STANTON: Yeah, right.
  • DOCTER: This is the stuff you dream about it as an animator.
  • STANTON: Oh, yeah.
  • LASSETER: But it's also the hardest stuff!
  • STANTON: Meaty subtext.
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • LASSETER: I mean, everybody thinks the big wild stuff would be hard, but this is hard.
  • STANTON: No, this is too hard.
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • NARRATOR: Supervising animator Pete Docter.
  • DOCTER: This scene has a great arc, where Woody starts intense and excited, and goes downhill, and Buzz starts way down and works his way up. We actually animated quite a bit of stuff that was cut out of this sequence. We started with like five pages of stuff...
  • STANTON: Right.
  • DOCTER: ...and cut, cut, cut. I think it works better for the film although the time I was like, "No, you can't cut it!"
  • LASSETER: Plus, those where your scenes that were cut.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • NARRATOR: Producer Bonnie Arnold.
  • ARNOLD: I find it amazing that you would not think that basically, none of the actors recorded their dialogue together. The picture editors, dialogue editors did such a great job of cutting the dialogue together that you would think they were all acting in the same room together.
  • Woody's voice box: There's a snake in my boot.
  • LASSETER: The lamest pull-string line.
  • STANTON: I know.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • DOCTER: That moment there is great because you've got this real heart-felt emotional stuff, but people laugh at that line.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • DOCTER: But they still feel the emotion.
  • STANTON: Oh, yeah. Well, 'cause it's painful.
  • LASSETER: "I'm just a loser."
  • GUGGENHEIM: And you need that moment of relief in the midst of a scene like this.
  • NARRATOR: Co-writer Andrew Stanton.
  • STANTON: This is where all these little things paid off that we were putting in just for touches at the beginning. The flavor of, looking at Andy's name under the shoe and the "Made in Taiwain." It really just helped sell...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Ahh.
  • STANTON: ...a lot of emotional hits.
  • NARRATOR: Art director Ralph Eggleston.
  • EGGLESTON: Throughout this entire sequence, the sun is rising. You kind of see a very subtle change from these somber blues, and throughout this, when they realize that they need each other, not only to escape, but to get back to Andy, the sun really breaks through the clouds, and they bond together and begin their escape.
  • LASSETER: The detail is incredible. I mean, you feel it.
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah. You know it's there.
  • LASSETER: You feel...
  • EGGLESTON: Yeah. A lot of times, you'd think that, "Ahh, look at all this work we did, let's show it off. Let's put lights back there." When, no, it's not important.
  • DOCTER: There's so much detail of just junk all over the desk.
  • LASSETER: It was all modeled.
  • DOCTER: Yeah.
  • EGGLESTON: Eggman Movers.
  • LASSETER: The Eggman was Ralph Eggleston's log-in. So that's why the moving...
  • DOCTER: Now here comes the big cheat. Where Buzz...
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • DOCTER: ...is straight now and there, they keep going.
  • LASSETER: They keep going. They're about three feet from the wall, but Buzz is still pushing.
  • STANTON: From the wall.
  • DOCTER: Go, Buzz! Go!
  • LASSETER: You can do it! It's a movie!
  • GUGGENHEIM: The hyper... The hyper-extended version of Buzz Lightyear.
  • DOCTER: Nobody notices. Hopefully.
  • Sid: I want to ride the pony.
  • STANTON: Another payback to all bullies.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: Me?
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: I'm hoping they're all dreaming about ponies.
  • Buzz: Woody...
  • LASSETER: He is a little kid after all. That's what I like about it so much, he's still just a little kid.
  • Woody: I'm okay.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Is that a can of Doctor Catmull's Root Beer I see?
  • DOCTER: Yeah. There's so much detail of just junk all over the desk.
  • LASSETER: It was all modeled. Ed Catmull's head of Pixar. And we'd have Doctor Catmull's Old-Fashioned Root Beer.
  • Sid: To infinity...
  • LASSETER: Well, it's really at this point that Woody is starting, you know, they've bonded now. Buzz and Woody. Here you start seeing that all the forces around them are keeping them apart.
  • STANTON: Right. The minute Woody wants... They join together, everything pulls them apart.
  • LASSETER: See. And right there he's saying he's relying on Buzz, you know? I think it's like what would... It's like... That's right, we had a line once. He said "What would Buzz do? He'd say something stupid. Not an option!"
  • DOCTER: "Not a plan. Not a plan. He'd say something!" That's where he gets the idea.
  • STANTON: But we felt like that projected too specifically what wehe was gonna do.
  • LASSETER: And he honestly asks for help here, which is great. I love this scene. Angie Glocka animated that.
  • DOCTER: Yeah it's just all emotion. Again, there's no facial challenge. It's just the timing.
  • STANTON: But you read that same expression differently now.
  • DOCTER: It's a different attitude...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Bob Gordon gave us the, editor Bob Gordon gave us Morse code.
  • LASSETER: For those who know Morse code, it actually...
  • DOCTER: You can figure it out. Don't tell.
  • STANTON: Gotta work if you wanna know.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Quick, run to your almanac. Look up your Morse code dictionary.
  • LASSETER: The scene where we cut to Andy in his room completely empty, to me, is one of the most emotional scenes in the film. You see the box that says "Andy's Toys," and to me, I just always remembered, when you move, this was your life. He lived all his life in this room. And to see it completely empty, and hoping that they...
  • STANTON: It would uncover them.
  • LASSETER: Right. It would uncover them. They're hidden and he realizes they're not around, and all he has left is his hat that represents Woody and the box that represents Buzz.
  • ARNOLD: This is that score moment that I think Randy did such a good job at. We had The Great Escape for scratch music and gave Randy an idea of what we were looking for. But I think Randy took that and made it 100 times better. But it really moves this along.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And it builds.
  • ARNOLD: And it builds, and it gives you the...
  • GUGGENHEIM: And it finally hits its most marching band sort of feeling at the moment when they go into the duct work of the house and really, it's a constant build all through here.
  • STANTON: Joss Whedon, our script writer, wrote these lines, and actually, when he wrote "Wind the frog," we loved that line so much, we actually created a frog just so that there would be a frog to say, "Wind the frog!"
  • LASSETER: We kind of did this big sort of Rube Goldberg-ian kind of, you know, plan, that's so complex. And we wanted to keep it from the audience so they didn't know what was going on. And you'd come in right at the very end where there's a bit of information being given, but who knows, you know what's actually gonna happen. And originally we had just Roller Bob and Woody go down. But then, we've liked... We've grown to like these mutant toys so much, you wanna see them get back at Sid.
  • STANTON: Right. So we had to add a layer of how to get everybody outside.
  • LASSETER: In the original script, one of... Woody asks for help. One of the characters goes out throught the vent, and you hear some noise, and come screeching through the door comes Barbie in her pink Corvette.
  • STANTON: From Hannah's room.
  • LASSETER: From Hannah's room. He goes to Hannah's room and gets Barbie and comes in. And she was dressed in a prom dress in the pink Corvette. She looked fantastic.
  • STANTON: But she was tough as nails.
  • LASSETER: She was like Linda Hamilton from Terminator 2. She grabbed Woody and said, "Come with me if you want to live."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And she drives him past the dog, and the dog, the dog's chasing him, and she drives him out to the backyard. And Woody said some great line about, "I wish I was anatomically correct."
  • STANTON: Right.
  • (BOTH LAUGH)
  • Sid: Uh, Roger...
  • STANTON: Sid's actually saying some funny walla all through this. When you're paying attention to Woody and the toys, he's actually searching for the ignition sticks.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yes.
  • STANTON: "Mom, where are the matches?"
  • GUGGENHEIM: The matches.
  • STANTON: "Never mind, here they are."
  • GUGGENHEIM: "Where are the matches?"
  • Sid: ...the matches?
  • LASSETER: And we always invisioned that Sid's dad is the kind of, is the kind of consumer that the big hardware stores prey on, where they get him into...
  • DOCTER: The home handyman!
  • LASSETER: The home handyman. Never finishes any job, and so he started putting in a sprinkler system in the backyard...
  • DOCTER: Years ago.
  • LASSETER: Years ago. And he left the trenches out.
  • STANTON: Right. And everything's half-done.
  • Sid: ...can have a cookout later.
  • DOCTER: This scene was originally to get Woody the match.
  • LASSETER: We originally had it to where he had sprinkled matches all over him. And then we realized he can just do it with one match.
  • Sid: ...T-minus 10 seconds.
  • LASSETER: There are so many weeds in this backyard. I think there's 18,000 weeds.
  • Sid: 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.
  • Woody's voice box: Reach...
  • STANTON: We actually in our first pass, had Woody come fully to life at the last second and scare Sid. But we decided it was too much, it was much more interesting to just have him use his pull-string. We were starting to use it again more and more in the film.
  • LASSETER: Well, this is the thing that always has kept him down.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: This is a thing, a scratchy voice box, and he uses it to defeat Sid.
  • Woody's voice box: Or smashed...
  • STANTON: We couldn't help but have that little button. Let him come to life for half a line, so maybe even Sid isn't sure he saw what he saw.
  • DOCTER: But it builds better that way.
  • LASSETER: We originally wanted to have the toys come out from under the ground, but iwas techically complex, so we decided to have this trench filled with muddy water 'cause it was much easier to do it, and have them rise up out of the water, which actually works. And then we did this muddy shader on the green army men.
  • STANTON: In the story reel, there were these great shots of like arms bursting out of the ground.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: Those Combat Carl's are the same model as the green army men, just a little larger with some spare parts stuck on them.
  • Woody's voice box: We toys...
  • DOCTER: So Rich Quade got to animate the one scene of Woody coming to life in front of people.
  • Woody: So play nice.
  • ARNOLD: Of course, the biggest comment from the outside world here was, "Was this stock footage?"
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • ARNOLD: "Was this a computer model?"
  • GUGGENHEIM: But no, every plant in Sid's backyard was hand placed, every weed.
  • Sid: The toys are alive! Nice toy...
  • LASSETER: And here's Hannah's payback. It's for all the little sisters in the world.
  • Hannah: Don't you wanna play with...
  • GUGGENHEIM: That were ever tormented by a big brother.
  • LASSETER: Tormented by a big brother is...
  • Woody: Nice work, fellas. Good job.
  • GUGGENHEIM: What's great is Gary Rydstrom did a great job of creating sound effects for all the toys in that scene.
  • LASSETER: He did sort of a... Even though they didn't talk, but he gave a voice.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Right. They're all talking to each other, congratulating each other. What they've done.
  • STANTON: The quickest goodbye in the world. "Thanks."
  • DOCTER: It wasn't there at all for a while, they just ran away, and we thought, "Wait a minute."
  • LASSETER: "Wait a minute." He's gotta say goodbye.
  • STANTON: I just didn't want it mushy.
  • LASSETER: That line there of Buzz, we used to have it saying, you know, "Woody, I'm stuck, come help me." And then we realized "No, no, no, he would be more giving." At this point, they are constantly helping each other, so he just, "You just go. You made it. It's okay." Now, they're together, so they're working together at this point.
  • STANTON: They're actually, finally for the first time in the film, on an even playing where they both want the same thing.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: For the same reason.
  • LASSETER: And so they're working together.
  • STANTON: We decided once they're finally working together, they would sacrifice for one another. And each sacrifice would empower them to get over the next obstacle. And then the next guy would sacrifice... And it was, it was really nice.
  • LASSETER: Even now that they're working together, Buzz runs like an athlete. He's Carl Lewis, you know? And Woody is a wimp. "Woah..." Yeah, look at, look at those arms.
  • STANTON: Yeah, yeah.
  • LASSETER: It's great. Whereas the Army Man sequence was the first thing that we produced, the chase sequence was the last. It was that way on purpose because we knew it was going to be huge.
  • NARRATOR: Supervising technical director Bill Reeves.
  • REEVES: We had to create six city blocks of model. And we used various techniques to, you know, make that problem be a little more tractable. We designed about 20 different houses. Bill Cone did a lot of the design work and Loren Carpenter did most of the technical creation of that stuff. And, so the houses were, you know, about 20 different varieties...
  • LASSETER: But they're very simple models.
  • REEVES: Oh, yeah.
  • LASSETER: It's just, like, a little box, really, with a roof.
  • REEVES: Yeah. There's texture maps painted on them. A lot of the slat work...
  • LASSETER: All the detail is just a painting.
  • REEVES: Yeah, right.
  • EGGLESTON: There's like 20 different styles, but then we would tweak colors...
  • REEVES: Yeah.
  • EGGLESTON: ...so then we had 40 different styles really. Sometimes we'd turn them.
  • GUGGENHEIM: But I think what makes people stop and gasp when they see this scene is the degree of dimension as you're traveling through the neighborhood. I think that is created by the trees and the light coming through them.
  • REEVES: Yeah, the trees. We had about 10 or 12 different trees. We could make each tree, each of those, be any different size we want. And we could play with... We could rotate them around and it would look different. It was a huge challenge to orchestrate this whole thing. I wanna point out Eben Ostby did a lot of that work, just sort of, you know, laying out the, the world and building a system so we could mix and match all these different parameters and nationally control it. 'Cause every shot was different. Or every, you know, chunk of shots. There were 267 shots in the chase.
  • GUGGENHEIM: What also was a great fundemental idea for the chase sequence is that it was overcoming, just like the movie, in this chase sequence one had to overcome one obstacle after another. And every time the stakes got higher, in terms of what it would take to catch that moving van. The goal remained the same.
  • STANTON: And the sacrifices got bigger.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • STANTON: And but from the day we had the treatment and we thought this idea, I was so jazzed, was the miscommunication that you've built with these toys in Andy's room. That everything Woody does to save Buzz looks like something bad that he's doing, and the toys try to stop him. I loved that, that ironic twist on that.
  • ARNOLD: I think we had a big discussion about make sure we don't think the dog is killed off here.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • (ARNOLD LAUGHS)
  • GUGGENHEIM: We have to insure that no animals were injured in the course of making this movie.
  • Woody: Buzz is out there. We gotta help him!
  • GUGGENHEIM: And the other thing that's great is the audience never tires of seeing Mr. Potato's... Head's parts get whacked off.
  • ARNOLD: That's great.
  • GUGGENHEIM: You can bang and smash Mr. Potato Head as often as you want and every time they love it.
  • Woody: Ahh!
  • ARNOLD: I think poor Tom Hanks told me so many times, he goes "I feel like I'm screaming through the whole movie, are you sure it's not gonna come off like that?" But it really doesn't.
  • Woody: Now let's catch up to that truck.
  • LASSETER: Beep. "Turbo."
  • STANTON: Is that like the shortest shot in the movie?
  • LASSETER: It's amazing how people read that "Turbo..."
  • GUGGENHEIM: Yes.
  • LASSETER: ...and it's for just a couple of frames.
  • Lenny: Guys!
  • ARNOLD: Again, great technical effort on the technical director's part, plus the great effort of our sound designer Gary Rydstrom to make this chase just work so incredibly well with the different sounds and noises that you hear in the neighborhood.
  • LASSETER: I was very inspired in early on, before we started this movie, with a Nissan 300ZX ad that Ridley Scott did for the Super Bowl.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And it was so intense, the cutting and stuff, and I said, "This is what is should be about." We would describe it saying, "The scale speed of remote controlled cars is like 70 or 80 miles an hour, so imagine being on top of a car going 70 or 80 miles an hour and trying to climb onto a 10-story building on wheels." And what I love about it is it made Slinky so heroic. It's so heroic, the more danger that you added to it.
  • Slinky Dog: Woah, woah, woah!
  • (screams)
  • ARNOLD: Of course the famous "Hakuna Matata" cut-back.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • LASSETER: When we were talking to Randy about recording something, you know, doing a piece of music like that he goes, "No, you know what they'd be listening to is they'd be listening to something like Lion King or something like that."
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • Woody: ...on!
  • (Slinky screams)
  • Toys: Ouch!
  • STANTON: This is... Again, with the whole battery set-ups we've had, it's great to have bring it back again, it made complete sense. The batteries are dying after all this. Now, this is the point where everybody in the theater... We knew everybody was, most of the smart people were going, "They're gonna light the rocket, they're gonna light the rocket."
  • LASSETER: "I know it, they're gonna light the rocket. Everybody's gonna light the rocket." And we actually, you know, originally just had them light the rocket.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And it absolutely, you know, drove us crazy, the predictability of it, so we said, "Let's just play into it."
  • STANTON (LAUGHS): Right, right.
  • LASSETER: Let's put one match, one rocket, one fuse and...
  • DOCTER: One car.
  • LASSETER: One car. And one car.
  • (ALL LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: And the wonderful like, moan that happens in the audience...
  • STANTON: It was the best response in the whole movie was that.
  • LASSETER: We were so excited when we showed this for the first time. They just went nuts.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Pulled it off.
  • LASSETER: Because at this point in time you would stop the movie and say, "What happens next?"
  • STANTON: And we actually...
  • LASSETER: And they... And people like wouldn't be able to tell. So once this rocket goes off, you know, I wanted it to have this massive explosion and just, it go... They're sort of out of control. I mean, they're not sort of, they're massively out of control. We always thought about, what would it be like, you know, to be on something going this fast? And we thought of those old NASA shots...
  • GUGGENHEIM: Astronauts, uh...
  • LASSETER, STANTON: G-forces.
  • LASSETER: ...and what the face does with the G-forces, and Doug Sweetland, the animator... He took, and this is the one that blew us away more than any other shot in the film. Is to what he did with that Woody model in the face.
  • REEVES: I modeled Woody and I couldn't believe when I saw this in dailies, right here...
  • (LASSETER AND GUGGENHEIM LAUGH)
  • REEVES: ...that Woody could do this. Woody can't do this! You know, and Doug somehow found a way to tweak that face.
  • STANTON: My favorite shot, is technically in the movie is this. It's so cool, it looks so real.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • STANTON: Going straight up, looking down.
  • Woody: ...blow up!
  • Buzz: Not today!
  • DOCTER: And "Not today" was a callback to... Originally the film opened with a...
  • LASSETER, GUGGENHEIM: Buzz Lightyear cartoon.
  • STANTON: Right.
  • DOCTER: And that was the payoff line.
  • STANTON: And it was like a Bond film, you came in on the climax of the episode and he said "Not today," and he burst open his wings and got out of his predicament.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And here's the real payoff.
  • Buzz: This is falling with style.
  • LASSETER: And we actually had a different line there. Right?
  • STANTON: Right.
  • LASSETER: And then it was animated. And it was finished and in dailies. You said, "No, you know what he sould say is..."
  • STANTON: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: "This is falling with style."
  • STANTON: "...style." Which makes Buzz seem very clever, like he remembered that line even though he wasn't listening...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: ...at the moment that that was said.
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • DOCTER: And it really gets... I think it gets people.
  • GUGGENHEIM: I love the way this next shot is composed, when Andy picks them up and grabs them.
  • LASSETER: Well, look at... If you look...
  • GUGGENHEIM: They wink to each other, just at the right moment, so that it's not... They never let on to Andy that they're alive.
  • DOCTER: That was a late addition as well.
  • GUGGENHEIM: That's right.
  • STANTON: The wink.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And then a marvelous piece of music by Randy Newman...
  • STANTON: That's not a real set!
  • GUGGENHEIM: Absolutely.
  • LASSETER: It's so, it's like... It's great.
  • STANTON: A painting.
  • DOCTER: Ash was very frustrated with that scene. He did a mock one of Andy picking up the tree and hitting Mom over the head with it.
  • (STANTON LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: "Frankincense, this is Myrrh."
  • DOCTER: This is a vestige of an old... We had a karaoke gag.
  • LASSETER: Karaoke Christmas party.
  • STANTON: Yeah. They had a pop-up Christmas book with a tree up, and then Buzz was actually singing karaoke using Mr. Spell to read off of.
  • DOCTER (SINGING): The weather outside is frightful.
  • STANTON: I don't know why that got cut because it's actually pretty funny.
  • Rex: ...get another dinosaur. Like a leaf eater.
  • STANTON: I remember writing that line in the sound booth while we had Wallace Shawn on his last day.
  • LASSETER: It's so great, it's completely... The entire room has changed because of the relationship of Buzz and Woody. You know, they're bonded now, and it's a subtle thing, that everything is... Everybody's like thinking the opposite, they're welcoming the new toys.
  • STANTON: Right. Right. It's affected the whole world.
  • LASSETER: Yeah.
  • GUGGENHEIM: And even the decor of the room. Isn't it now a mixture of cowboy and Western?
  • LASSETER: Yeah, yeah. It's now both.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Cowboy and space design.
  • LASSETER: Cowboy and space. Everything's together.
  • STANTON: One of our story artists Jill Coulton, actually in passing was, when we were trying to think of what Andy would get...
  • LASSETER: Right.
  • STANTON: ...for a final toy, she said, sort of threw it out, "What about a puppy?" And it was like, ding! That's right!
  • LASSETER: Yes! That's what they should get.
  • (puppy barking)
  • Andy: Wow! A puppy!
  • LASSETER: When we started Toy Story, I think the big goal for us was to do a character movie. Was to have a film that had a good story, but characters that you could just... Really memorable and you feel for that would make you laugh. To have the main characters funny, not just the characters funny, not just the comic sidekicks, But also that you really felt for and had a lot of heart. And that was a thing we started out with. I knew this film would look different than anything anybody had seen. But it was to just sweep them away with great story and great characters. I'm really proud of that.
  • GUGGENHEIM: Second to how great the story was, I think the other thing we were aiming for with this film, knowing that we were making the first computer-animated feature film ever, was to really set a high level of quality consistently in terms of how the film would look and how all the elements of music and art direction and animation would all fit together to make the film as high quality as we could.
  • EGGLESTON: I was really surprised that I was asked to work on a computer-animated feature film when I had zero experience in computer animation whatsoever. I had to stop at the beginning of production and say, "Am I gonna learn about computers or am I gonna concentrate on the goals that John and I agree on?" And we concentrated on supporting the story and the characters. And by virture of doing that, the computer kind of downplayed itself, through the story.
  • DOCTER: Animation-wise it was great to have the chance to have a story with a character with subtext and arc. And to be able to try to, and this was the aim of the animation, to have people forget that this is computer animation. That all they care about is the character, and they're relating to this person, a real person, to them. And I think thanks to the great animators that worked on the film that we succeeded.
  • REEVES: The film was a great opportunity for me to work with some amazingly talented people, John, Ralph and just everybody. To come together as a team and to do the first fully computer-animated film. It's a culmination of many, many years of personality, in my life, and I know the other people on the team to do this, and it was... I'm just so proud of being part of the whole... The whole mix.
  • ARNOLD: What I think was probably one of the most challenging things about making Toy Story, was the fact that no one had ever done this type, this before. No one ever made a feature length computer-animated film. And what I think we worked hatd at trying to do was getting people that were the best at what they did. We say that we had more PhD's working on our film than in any other film crew that we knew of. And I think the biggest challenges, is for Ralph Guggenhim, heim and myself as producers, was try to assemble a crew that would kind of face up to the challenge of what it would take to do something that one one had ever done... done before.
  • STANTON: It's funny, we were really a small group of people that made it and we're all oredominately pretty young and somebody compared us once to the guys at NASA that put the man on the moon. It's like we were all too young and stupid to realize what we were doing is impossible.
  • (GUGGENHEIM LAUGHS)
  • STANTON: And from story all the way to technically making this movie. I'm glad we were young and ignorant and stupid because we didn't let that stop us.
  • GUGGENHEIM: 'Cause knowing what we know now...
  • STANTON: I know.
  • GUGGENHEIM: ...we'd never wanna do it again.
  • STANTON (LAUGHS): I know.
  • LASSETER: It's impossible. Kids don't try this at home.
  • STANTON: I always tell people that it's like, you know, what we did we just made what we thought was fun that we'd like to watch ourselves. We made it for ourselves.
  • LASSETER: Yeah, we did. I mean, that's why there's so many like homages to every great movie that we have ever loved in this.
  • STANTON: We so unabashedly put them in.
  • LASSETER: Yeah. (LAUGHS)
  • GUGGENHEIM: But even more importantly, you know, we were all... We've all worked together for a long time, certainly the core group that started this film. And we all were possessed with the same dream that we wanted to realize. I think it was holding that dream in front of us the whole time that we were making the film is what kept it going and what allowed us to be crazy enough to put all the time and effort into it and allowed us to succeed at it.
  • LASSETER (SNIFFLES): I love you, man.
  • (LASSETER AND STANTON LAUGH)
  • LASSETER: Andrew, can I have a ride home?
  • STANTON: Sure, John, yeah. But you gotta pay the toll.
  • (LASSETER LAUGHS)

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